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New research article: Is low carb bad over the long term?

Answered on December 13, 2013
Created December 12, 2013 at 12:12 AM

New research paper examines the potential downsides of a low carb diet. Not implying I agree, but it'd be nice to hear everyone's opinion.

Low-carbohydrate diets: what are the potential short- and long-term health implications?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14672862

Medium avatar

(10601)

on December 12, 2013
at 04:39 PM

Just another crusader. No original research. A selective literature dredge.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on December 12, 2013
at 04:35 PM

+1 for "low crab". I haven't had enough crab lately...high time I did something about it...

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on December 12, 2013
at 08:30 AM

I don't know why my response appears as a quote.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 12, 2013
at 01:33 AM

New… 10 years ago.

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3 Answers

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on December 12, 2013
at 08:28 AM

The full article is here: https://dro.deakin.edu.au/eserv/DU:30008636/crowe-lowcarbohydratediets-2003.pdf

Note that it was published in 2003, TEN years ago. You must have dug hard to find it. I'm down-voting your question because you don't appear to have looked at it critically before posting it with a provocative topic. And to be clear, it's not research, it's a review article. The authors bring up points, cite some research, and draw fuzzy conclusions. For example, they claim that because some children have side effects from ketogenic diets used to treat seizures, therefore " documented side-effects may potentially pose a serious health risk to individuals." But, there are no studies to show the supposed health risks (and none have appeared in the intervening ten years). All of the supposed dangers are baseless extrapolations. One of the authors' complaints was that there were no good studies on low carb diets. There have been some in the last 10 years, and every time they show The superiority of low carb, high fat diets in both the short and long term when compared to low fat diets. See, for example: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2012.01021.x/abstract;jsessionid=7396D07C42DB2B84642D35158B132AF9.d04t04. This meta-analysis of 17 comparative studies found "LCD was shown to have favourable effects on body weight and major cardiovascular risk factors". Likewise, they speculate that low carb creates dietary inadequacy "(as defined by the amount of inclusion of the five major foods groups and alignment with the U.S. Dietary Guidelines) while high-carbohydrate diets (defined as greater than 55% of energy from carbohydrates) gave the highest dietary adequacy score." Yep, gotta get those five servings of grains in every day! Note that he did not present any studies that show illness or adverse effects from supposed dietary "inadequacy"--only that the diet did not meet some guidelines set by special interests. The article goes on and on with all the old "low carb diets are dangerous" chestnuts--it'll raise cholesterol (inferring a now disproven connection to cardiovascular disease) it might harm kidneys (we now know low carb diets may be a treatment for kidney failure), it's hard to exercise (aerobically) in ketosis (see Phinney and Vollek's Art and Science of Low Carb performance). Perhaps the most telling about where the authors are coming from is here: "A comprehensive recent review of popular diets concluded that a diet that is high in fruit and vegetables, whole-grains, legumes, and low-fat dairy products as well as being moderate in fat and kilojoules will result in the greatest chance of weight loss and maintenance. Such diets are also associated with fullness and satiety and can reduce risk of chronic disease." Yes, let's get on board with grains, legumes, and low fat dairy because we all here know just how well THAT works to lose weight and optimize health! My opinion of this article is that it's a load of bologna.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on December 12, 2013
at 08:30 AM

I don't know why my response appears as a quote.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on December 12, 2013
at 04:39 PM

Just another crusader. No original research. A selective literature dredge.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on December 12, 2013
at 08:18 AM

The full article is here: https://dro.deakin.edu.au/eserv/DU:30008636/crowe-lowcarbohydratediets-2003.pdf

Note that it was published in 2003, h You must have dug hard to find it. It's not research, it's a review article. The author brings up points, cites some research, and draws fuzzy conclusions. For example, he claims that because some children have side effects from ketogenic diets used to treat seizures, therefore " documented side-effects may potentially pose a serious health risk to individuals." But, there are no studies to show the supposed health risks (and none have appeared in the intervening ten years). All of his supposed dangers are baseless extrapolations. One of the author's complaints was that there were no good studies on low carb diets. There have been some in the last 10 years, and every time they show The superiority of low carb, high fat diets in both the short and long term when compared to low fat diets. See, for example: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2012.01021.x/abstract;jsessionid=7396D07C42DB2B84642D35158B132AF9.d04t04. This meta-analysis of 17 comparative studies found "LCD was shown to have favourable effects on body weight and major cardiovascular risk factors". Likewise, he speculates that low carb creates dietary inadequacy "(as defined by the amount of inclusion of the five major foods groups and alignment with the U.S. Dietary Guidelines) while high-carbohydrate diets (defined as greater than 55% of energy from carbohydrates) gave the highest dietary adequacy score." Yep, gotta get those five servings of grains in every day! Note that he did not present any studies that show illness or adverse effects from supposed dietary "inadequacy"--only that the diet did not meet some guidelines set by special interests. The article goes on and on with all the old "low carb diets are dangerous" chestnuts--it'll raise cholesterol (inferring a now disproven connection to cardiovascular disease) it might harm kidneys (we now know low carb diets may be a treatment for kidney failure), it's hard to exercise (aerobically) in ketosis (see Phinney and Vollek's Art and Science of Low Carb performance). Perhaps the most telling about where the author is coming from is here: "A comprehensive recent review of popular diets concluded that a diet that is high in fruit and vegetables, whole-grains, legumes, and low-fat dairy products as well as being moderate in fat and kilojoules will result in the greatest chance of weight loss and maintenance. Such diets are also associated with fullness and satiety and can reduce risk of chronic disease." Yes, let's get on board with grains, legumes, and low fat dairy because we all here at Paleohacks know just how well THAT works to lose weight and optimize health! My opinion of this article is that it's a load of bologna, and I'm scratching my head to figure out what is useful about posting a 10 year old, outdated article with a sensationalist topic heading. Therefore I'm down voting the question.

0
F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on December 12, 2013
at 07:50 AM

Yes, paleo diet over the long term is bad. Everyone who eats a paleo diet, dies. Hopefully, we'll die healthy as opposed SAD eaters, who succumb to any one of a number of chronic degenerative diseases and at a much lower age.

Looks like the author changed his tune a bit a couple years later

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16045639

He still appears to be solidly anti-low carb but he's dialed back the rhetoric a bit. He seems to wish for data that condemns low carb & exalts whole grains. I hate when researchers don't really do research but hope to confirm pet theories & their bias.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on December 12, 2013
at 04:35 PM

+1 for "low crab". I haven't had enough crab lately...high time I did something about it...

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