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New Blood Glucose Monitor

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 18, 2012 at 2:35 PM

Hello,

I'm a 22 yr old male and have been Low Carb/Paleo for just over a year. I've lost about 95 pounds since starting and just recently got a free blood glucose monitor. Here I've been randomly testing out of curiosity and I have some questions. It seems my average fasting blood glucose is around 60. The lowest I've seen it was 56. Two hours after a meal its normally 80-90. I have never seen a number above 100. Is that a bad thing? I feel great and have tons of energy but it seems that a lot of articles I have read say it's very low.

Thanks for your help........

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on November 19, 2012
at 06:49 AM

I second that about the Freestyle reading low. I started on that kind, and was protesting my GD diagnosis loudly because it didn't seem that I could get a number over 110 even after huge or carb heavy meals. My insurance wouldn't cover strips, so I switched to One Touch and my fasting jumped from mid 60s-70s to mid 80s-90s overnight without changing my diet, so I think the meters can vary wildly. I wish I would have saved one of the old strips so I could compare side by side.

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on November 18, 2012
at 04:53 PM

What the heck ?

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7 Answers

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2
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on November 18, 2012
at 10:09 PM

Your numbers are fine.

Well controlled diabetics try to keep their 2 hour post-prandial BG <140 mg/dl.

I'm a T2 and I can keep my < 108 mg/dl almmost all of the time by eating <25g of carbohydrate a day. If I ate more than, say, 50g in a meal, my BG would be significantly higher than 140g after 2 hours.

Hypoglycemia (where your BG gets too low) is most usually induced by taking too much diabetic medication (either insulin or insulin production provoking medication). If you aren't feeling faint or shakey at those levels, I really wouldn't worry about it.

2
E2db1519690001648433e8109eb2c013

on November 18, 2012
at 09:48 PM

If you are on diabetes meds, the 50/60 fasting could be scary. If you aren't there should not be a problem. 80-90 post prandial is great. You can try testing at 30 min intervals after eating just to be sure there isn't a higher peak snuck in there.

1
531b053b68e92ac509fc1544f88dc103

(1205)

on November 19, 2012
at 01:45 PM

When I went low carb, I was getting fasting readings between 58-63 as well. I didn't feel bad though, perhaps a little chilly, but certainly not dizzy or tired. When I ate, my number would go up to 80-90 and drop back down to 68 or so an hour after my meals. I lost a lot of weight during that time.

1
6bfdd8cf7752af417ca0d1446c875616

on November 19, 2012
at 04:14 AM

I would also be willing to bet that the low fastings are due to meter error. I am Type 1 diabetic and have read a fair amount about meter accuracy. Sadly, most are very inaccurate. The only way to know for sure is to get your blood taken and sent to a lab. Check your blood sugar from the same drop that they draw from and compare the lab results to your meter.

1
D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on November 19, 2012
at 12:23 AM

That is a bit low and I would be concerned. Thankfully, the meter you're using is not the most accruate one. So I tend to think your numbers are higher than that. Freestyle usually underreads BG.

If your fasting is around 60, that's on the low side but if you don't have hypoglycemic symptoms, most doctors wouldn't bother. The important thing for you is to get an A1c done and see just how low it is. An average BG of around 70 is around 3.6-4.1, depending on which conversion you use. If your average is close to 60, I'd be concerned. That suggests yoru A1c is 3.3 to 3.9.

The reason here is that at 20, you're not diabetic, just on a low-carb diet. Most VLC dieters experience physiological insulin resistance and have higher fasting but lower A1c. You don't and if that's confirmed by A1c, you should be screened for additional risk factors. I'd watch out for your liver enzymes (ALT, AST, GGT), hepatitis status, WBC, RBC, Hemoglobin, low TC, and low BP. Those with A1c < 4 are associated with higher mortality and parallel those with extremely low TC in being susceptible to morbidities.

Contrary to what some people think, the ideal A1c range is 4.5-5.3 or so for people eating normally, i.e., not low-carbing. For those who do low carb, the numbers can be as low as 4.0 but there could be underlying reasons other than BG control if much lower than 4.0.

PHD talked about this. There are factors other than BG control. The relationship between health and BG readings is not a straight line but a J curve. At some point, you lower your BG at the expense of your health.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20923991

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on November 19, 2012
at 06:49 AM

I second that about the Freestyle reading low. I started on that kind, and was protesting my GD diagnosis loudly because it didn't seem that I could get a number over 110 even after huge or carb heavy meals. My insurance wouldn't cover strips, so I switched to One Touch and my fasting jumped from mid 60s-70s to mid 80s-90s overnight without changing my diet, so I think the meters can vary wildly. I wish I would have saved one of the old strips so I could compare side by side.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 18, 2012
at 05:13 PM

I used my meter seriously to control T2 five years ago, and occasionally get it out for fun science experiments. Strips are expensive though. +30 post prandial sounds about right for a healthy person. 50-60 fasting sounds a little low, a concern especially for diabetics because of the risk of hypoglycemic coma, and would probably call for a glucose lozenge.

0
F299706618ad5d2c014130cb35d07dcf

on November 18, 2012
at 04:20 PM

Hello,

I'm a type 1 diabetic and deal with blood sugars constantly. I just want to say that I think it's great that you are so interested in and active about your health. I Have been reading Dr. Bernstein's book about called The Diabetes Solution. He spends the first chapter explaining in detail what a non-diabetic's blood sugars are supposed to look like and comparing that to those of the average diabetic. Anyway, he states that the a non-diabetic's blood sugar stays in the range of 70-95mg/dl, with a lowest at 65mg/dl and a high of 160mg/dl. He said that the average for most people is around 83mg/dl. I hope this can help you put things in perspective a little bit.

To me your numbers sound great, but that's just my opinion. Keep in mind that blood glucose monitors are not 100% accurate. I find that they can very quite a bit when comparing between meters or two consecutive tests.

 Best of luck! 
 - Hannah 

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on November 18, 2012
at 04:53 PM

What the heck ?

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