2

votes

Lustig cites a LC study that shows greater risk markers to heart disease through non-traditional pathways

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 03, 2013 at 4:50 PM

I came across this study linking low-carb diets to cardiovascular disease in reading Robert Lustig's new book.

http://mygreendiet.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/2286.pdf

Thoughts?

Henry

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on July 27, 2013
at 04:12 PM

Mouse is the singular of mice. That should read I'm not a mouse, are you one? And your argument is a straw man's. -1.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on April 04, 2013
at 03:22 PM

Don't have time to read the study, but what were the macro ratios and what fat was used to make the diet "High fat"? And don't mice process fat differently than humans? I'd want a whole lot more info before I decide to be concerned.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 03, 2013
at 07:41 PM

Mice with genetically removed ApoE no less.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 03, 2013
at 07:40 PM

A mice with defective ApoE no less.

Frontpage book

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2 Answers

2
336c383a3c4d28652d7ab888c79108a3

on April 03, 2013
at 11:08 PM

http://www.pnas.org/content/106/36/15418.full Vascular effects of a low-carbohydrate high-protein diet

" the macronutrient changes in the LCHP diet used here mimic the diets commonly used in humans, where reduced carbohydrate intake is generally accompanied by increased protein and fat intake. Interestingly, multiple results in mice on the LCHP diet paralleled those reported in clinical trials including reduced weight gain without significant changes in serum lipids or other markers of cardiovascular risk (10, 11), further reinforcing the potential relevance of this model.

Exacerbated atherosclerosis occurred on the LCHP diet independent of significant alterations in traditional atherogenic serum lipids, serum inflammatory markers and histological indicators of inflammatory infiltration. We did detect a significant increase in serum NEFA levels on the LCHP diets (Table 1) but this was not correlated to an increase in serum measures of inflammation. Importantly, there was no evidence of increased leukocyte infiltration in plaques from mice on the LCHP diet. We did not detect a significant difference in either circulating oxLDL or tissue markers of oxidative stress. Together these data suggest that neither an increase in the inciting signals nor in the inflammatory cascade are responsible for the increased atherosclerosis seen on the LCHP diet when compared with the similarly high-fat WD.

Although caution is warranted in extrapolating from such animal studies, these data at least raise concern that low-carbohydrate high-protein diets could have adverse vascular effects not adequately reflected in serum risk markers. Moreover, these observations demonstrate important pathophysiological vascular effects of nonlipid macronutrients that are dissociated from weight gain. These features provide a unique model for understanding mechanisms of atherogenesis and neovascularization that may have implications for efforts to combat obesity and reduce its complications."

http://mygreendiet.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/2286.pdf A Look at the Low-Carbohydrate Diet

"Traditionally, the atherosclerotic risk profile that is associated with specific diets is determined by measuring intermediate risk factors, such as levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and C-reactive protein. The work of Foo et al. suggests that the HPLC diet might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease through mechanisms that have nothing to do with these ???usual suspects??? and so provides a note of caution against reliance on the traditional cardiovascular risk factors as a gauge of safety."

SO - shouldn't we be a little concerned??

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on April 04, 2013
at 03:22 PM

Don't have time to read the study, but what were the macro ratios and what fat was used to make the diet "High fat"? And don't mice process fat differently than humans? I'd want a whole lot more info before I decide to be concerned.

1
A0c49f398499246c623e6527e9dd5ca2

(548)

on April 03, 2013
at 05:01 PM

This paper tells me that it's bad for a mice to consume high-fat, low-carb, high-protein diet.

Well, I'm not a mice! Are you one?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 03, 2013
at 07:41 PM

Mice with genetically removed ApoE no less.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 03, 2013
at 07:40 PM

A mice with defective ApoE no less.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on July 27, 2013
at 04:12 PM

Mouse is the singular of mice. That should read I'm not a mouse, are you one? And your argument is a straw man's. -1.

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