1

votes

Low Carb VS Higher Lower Carb - Insulin resistance VS Insulin sensitivity

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 17, 2012 at 9:52 AM

I watched this video:

The Battle of the Diets

and around 42:00 the professor explained that people with insulin resistance did better on LC diet, but people with insulin sensitivity did better on higher carb diets.

What is the difference between insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity? Can you check both in one test?

Basically, I need it to be explained in very easy basic terms - I have tried looking it up, but I am not sure I understand.

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2030)

on December 06, 2012
at 02:15 AM

I hope so too. The body is really complex that's for sure.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 05, 2012
at 05:10 AM

Honestly, I have never believed in LC for ... healthy people. It does not make sense. Everything I know points out in higher carb content. However, for sick people (and I am one of them, unfortunately) very low carb seems to be more or less a solution. Not sure it has something to do with gut flora. It would be interesting for me to know whether I will be able to go higher on carbs after my gut flora returns to normal (I sure hope it returns to normal one day).

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 18, 2012
at 01:30 AM

Thanks for the explanation. Very informative.

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on November 17, 2012
at 03:57 PM

Sorry, link got truncated from my previous comment. Here it is: http://chriskresser.com/when-your-normal-blood-sugar-isnt-normal-part-1

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on November 17, 2012
at 03:57 PM

I think the easiest way is to test yourself with a glucose meter. Test your blood sugar before a meal. Eat a set amount of carbs or even a mixed meal. Then test your blood sugar 15 minutes after eating and every 30 minutes thereafter, something like that. This is similar to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) that your doctor can perform, but this way you do it in your own home and don't have to drink a super sweet soda. If your blood sugar gets really high or stays elevated for a long time, you might have a problem. Check out Chris Kresser's info: http://chriskresser.com/when-your-normal-b

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 17, 2012
at 02:49 PM

So insulin resistance is 0 response, but insulin sensitivity is 1 to 100 or something like that?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 17, 2012
at 02:49 PM

How does one know if he is insulin sensitive or insulin resistant?

  • F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

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4 Answers

3
1d1a374aeeb10cfa35bbb2159051e0c2

on November 17, 2012
at 10:28 AM

Insulin resistance is a condition where your body does not respond to insulin and insulin sensitivity is the degree to which cells respond to insulin.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 17, 2012
at 02:49 PM

So insulin resistance is 0 response, but insulin sensitivity is 1 to 100 or something like that?

2
D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on November 17, 2012
at 10:24 PM

The prof seems to define it based on fasting insulin. Under 10 is IS; Over 10 is IR. His presentation adds further layer to the low-carb vs. low fat debate by showing that your success/failure may be due to insulin resistance or insulin sensitivity.

Which is pretty intuitive. If you're insulin resistant, you're either diabetic, prediabetic or in the process of becoming either. High serum insulin levels fail to bring your BG down. If so, going on a low-fat (i.e., high carb) diet won't be very productive since you can't bring down your BG efficiently. Low carb is your best bet (although I'd argue that VLC is probably not ideal). Low carb meaning >75g and <150g, and all of the carb sources from whole food safe starches. What the prof didn't mention is that you can be IR but become IS by going on a LC diet, as long as you haven't crossed the diabetic threshold. But this was only a 4 month study.

If you're insulin sensitive, you have low FI and healthy glucose metabolism. We're talking about someone with A1cs of 4.1-5.2 or so and FBG of 75-85. For them, the higher safe starch diet won't cause much harm since they respond to insulin efficiently. But a low carb diet won't do harm either. I'd say either diets are neutral if you're insulin sensitive. In other words, carb-neutral if you have healthy glucose metabolism.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 18, 2012
at 01:30 AM

Thanks for the explanation. Very informative.

2
D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on November 17, 2012
at 12:15 PM

They are opposites. If you are insulin sensitive, you are not insulin resistant and vice-versa.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 17, 2012
at 02:49 PM

How does one know if he is insulin sensitive or insulin resistant?

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on November 17, 2012
at 03:57 PM

Sorry, link got truncated from my previous comment. Here it is: http://chriskresser.com/when-your-normal-blood-sugar-isnt-normal-part-1

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on November 17, 2012
at 03:57 PM

I think the easiest way is to test yourself with a glucose meter. Test your blood sugar before a meal. Eat a set amount of carbs or even a mixed meal. Then test your blood sugar 15 minutes after eating and every 30 minutes thereafter, something like that. This is similar to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) that your doctor can perform, but this way you do it in your own home and don't have to drink a super sweet soda. If your blood sugar gets really high or stays elevated for a long time, you might have a problem. Check out Chris Kresser's info: http://chriskresser.com/when-your-normal-b

1
7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2030)

on December 04, 2012
at 09:47 PM

Interesting video thanks VB, so I've always experienced negative side effects when dropping carbs and have attributed this to poor metabolic health possibly poor liver gallbladder function. But I'm not so sure anymore maybe I'm just really insulin sensitive as I'm able to tolerate a higher carb diet fine.

I basically experience all the symptoms the Jaminets have blogged about on their site: anxiety, dry eyes, constipation etc. So being insulin sensitive do you think perhaps that glucose is getting cleared quickly from the bloodstream too quickly in anticipation of more on the way causing lots of undesirable symptoms.

I've generally given up trying lc and I'm not gonna go back I feel good at PHD macros. I was only trying at the advice of a practitioner.

Sorry to answer your question with a question but your right there isn't much information out there on this topic.

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2030)

on December 06, 2012
at 02:15 AM

I hope so too. The body is really complex that's for sure.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 05, 2012
at 05:10 AM

Honestly, I have never believed in LC for ... healthy people. It does not make sense. Everything I know points out in higher carb content. However, for sick people (and I am one of them, unfortunately) very low carb seems to be more or less a solution. Not sure it has something to do with gut flora. It would be interesting for me to know whether I will be able to go higher on carbs after my gut flora returns to normal (I sure hope it returns to normal one day).

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