2

votes

Chronic Cardio cause? What about when Lo-Carb?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 22, 2010 at 4:13 PM

Is the issue with chronic cardio the reason for health problems blamed on super fitness endurance athletes or...

Could it be long term chronic carbohydrate intake?

Anyone know of any studies done on low carb chronic cardio?

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 22, 2010
at 03:25 AM

Have you looked into the research on the tarahumara? It's spotty but it seems to suggest they eat very high carb, run insane distance and have few diseases of civilization.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 24, 2010
at 12:39 PM

I'll read them, thanks

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 24, 2010
at 12:36 PM

That it is linked to poor heart health long term

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on June 24, 2010
at 03:37 AM

What do you mean believe in? Dangers? Benefits?

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on June 24, 2010
at 03:35 AM

Seems there are other factors to account for as well?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 23, 2010
at 01:52 PM

I already believe in chronic cardio in a high carb environment, I really want to know about it in a high fat low carb environment

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 23, 2010
at 01:50 PM

So fat is wayyyy better than carbs for endurance how does it affect heart disease elevated cortisol?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 23, 2010
at 01:46 PM

Doesn't address carbs

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on June 23, 2010
at 03:37 AM

Elevated cortisol levels during exercise are a mechanism to control blood glucose levels. The rise is short, subdued by ingestion of carbohydrate and probably does not contribute to chronic elevation of cortisol. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6532339

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on June 23, 2010
at 03:31 AM

Most of the energy used in endurance training comes from oxidative phosphorylation. 3 grams of palmitic acid produces roughly the same amount of ATP (via the citric acid cycle) as does the glycolysis of 180 grams of glucose.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 23, 2010
at 02:27 AM

Our bodies once fat adapted can create what we need at an adequate speed, that's been proven, there have been ZC marathoners, the question is whether the ZC marathoners also suffer the CC diseases o if it's the carb byproducts?

36dd8a49324c45fb49a38765000eca1e

(377)

on June 23, 2010
at 12:52 AM

I don't see where there is any controversy. The carbohydrate demands of the elite marathon runner vs. the needs of your average weekend jogger vastly differ. There are too many variables in the individual and their goals to simply say x amount of carbs will suffice for every runner. The fact is, if you deplete your glycogen stores faster than your body can replenish them, you will feel and perform like crap.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 22, 2010
at 10:06 PM

Whether they need the carbs is controversial, but I agree that that belief is why they do it.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

2
03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on June 22, 2010
at 05:09 PM

I doubt a search would turn up much. There's a reason that endurance runners eat a lot of carbs: they need the starch to fuel the enormous oxidative-glycolytic energy demands in the muscle cells. (And my understanding is that both elements contribute to ill effects: the running spikes cortisol levels and the carbs do all the things we already know they do).

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 23, 2010
at 01:50 PM

So fat is wayyyy better than carbs for endurance how does it affect heart disease elevated cortisol?

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on June 23, 2010
at 03:37 AM

Elevated cortisol levels during exercise are a mechanism to control blood glucose levels. The rise is short, subdued by ingestion of carbohydrate and probably does not contribute to chronic elevation of cortisol. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6532339

36dd8a49324c45fb49a38765000eca1e

(377)

on June 23, 2010
at 12:52 AM

I don't see where there is any controversy. The carbohydrate demands of the elite marathon runner vs. the needs of your average weekend jogger vastly differ. There are too many variables in the individual and their goals to simply say x amount of carbs will suffice for every runner. The fact is, if you deplete your glycogen stores faster than your body can replenish them, you will feel and perform like crap.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 22, 2010
at 10:06 PM

Whether they need the carbs is controversial, but I agree that that belief is why they do it.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 23, 2010
at 02:27 AM

Our bodies once fat adapted can create what we need at an adequate speed, that's been proven, there have been ZC marathoners, the question is whether the ZC marathoners also suffer the CC diseases o if it's the carb byproducts?

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on June 23, 2010
at 03:31 AM

Most of the energy used in endurance training comes from oxidative phosphorylation. 3 grams of palmitic acid produces roughly the same amount of ATP (via the citric acid cycle) as does the glycolysis of 180 grams of glucose.

1
36dd8a49324c45fb49a38765000eca1e

(377)

on June 23, 2010
at 09:20 PM

This is an extremely complex question, because there are simply too many variables that would require a massive controlled study to come to an acceptable conclusion. The study linked from panu only addresses elite marathon runners and completely ignores the impact of the diet. We all know that carbohydrate quality is of the utmost importance and makes every difference our health, and runners are notorious for consuming massive quantities of crap carbs, which I believe is the likely culprit for the health issues described in that study. Is it the carbohydrate consumption alone that causes problems, regardless of quality? I think Kitavan paradox can shed some light on that question.

But I have to ask, Stephen, are you a runner who is worried about the long term effects of running on a low carb paleo diet? Here are a couple links that you may or may have not seen that addresses the issue better than I ever could:

http://freetheanimal.com/2010/04/born-to-run.html

http://trainnowlivelater.blogspot.com/2010/04/theres-running-and-theres-running.html

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 24, 2010
at 12:39 PM

I'll read them, thanks

0
1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on June 23, 2010
at 04:00 AM

Kurt outlines two studies on his blog, Cardio causes heart disease and Still not born to run

Excessive carbohydrate intake could be a factor, but so could the intensity of exercise. Relationships of Heart Disease Risk Factors to Exercise Quantity and Intensity

"Men and women who ran faster (ie, at greater intensity) had lower blood pressures; triglyceride levels; ratios of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; BMI ... "

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on June 24, 2010
at 03:35 AM

Seems there are other factors to account for as well?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on June 23, 2010
at 01:46 PM

Doesn't address carbs

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!