1

votes

How many grams of glycogen can be held in the liver and muscles?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 05, 2010 at 6:06 AM

How many grams of glycogen can be held in the liver, and then also, how many in muscles? I've heard about 100 grams in the liver, and 400 grams in the muscles, but I need to make sure. Does anyone have any good sources for this info? Thanks!

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on September 06, 2010
at 01:17 AM

I just need the info for a nutrition program, I'm explaining a bit of the science.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 06, 2010
at 12:41 AM

http://ajpendo.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/255/5/E621

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 06, 2010
at 12:40 AM

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1748-1716.1970.tb04764.x/abstract?systemMessage=Due+to+scheduled+maintenance+access+to+the+Wiley+Online+Library+may+be+disrupted+as+follows%3A+Monday%2C+6+September+-+New+York+0400+EDT+to+0500+EDT%3B+London+0900+BST+to+1000+BST%3B+Singapore+1600+to+1700

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 06, 2010
at 12:39 AM

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/reprint/56/1/292S.pdf

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 09:13 PM

An non-credible or made up source. The few studies I've reviewed on human glycogen content suggest a range of 50-250 mmol of glycogen per kg of wet muscle, which puts stephan's answer a couple of orders of magnitude off target.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 09:09 PM

Why do you need to make sure, physiology test? How much you store has little influence on how much you can consume.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 09:09 PM

Also, there's not much to suggest the sequenced recovery meals you suggest being more effective for increasing glycogen levels than traditional depletion/repletion cycles.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 09:06 PM

An non-credible or made up source. The few studies I've reviewed on human glycogen content suggest a range of 50-250 mmol of glycogen per kg of wet muscle.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 08:43 PM

This is a horrible answer, store up to 1200grams of carbohydrate as what? glycogen? fat? Stop the hand waving with insulin, and stick to answering questions where you have relevant info.

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3 Answers

best answer

1
52cae90a114ca8f0404948e2b7ccb7ef

(1595)

on September 05, 2010
at 12:37 PM

That sounds similar the numbers I've heard, but the number is variable depending on the person, their food intake, and their activity. In 'Metabolic Regulation - A Human Perspective' by Keith N. Frayn the typical numbers are listed as 50-120g in Liver and 350-400g in muscle.

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on September 05, 2010
at 02:44 PM

what size person, what % bodyfat, what % lean muscle, is it fast twitch or slow twitch muscle, what activity has been done recently, super saturation etc. The list goes on and on and on with variables... theres no way to accurately give a #

The best we can do is theorize an average. Which it looks like you have already.

Our maximal carbohydrate storage is approximately 15 grams per kilogram of body weight [15 grams per 2.2 pounds]. So a 175-pound athlete could store up to 1200 grams of carbohydrate [4,800 calories]

Mind you, thats from 0, so dont just go eat 5000 calories of carbs. You will store most of it as fat. Our bodies convert carbs to sugars and thus insulin ramps up quickly to start its job...

If you want to increase how much is stored for a high intensity sporting event, its one of the few times I support and encourage alot of really small meals spaced out over the day for a couple days beforehand.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 08:43 PM

This is a horrible answer, store up to 1200grams of carbohydrate as what? glycogen? fat? Stop the hand waving with insulin, and stick to answering questions where you have relevant info.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 09:09 PM

Also, there's not much to suggest the sequenced recovery meals you suggest being more effective for increasing glycogen levels than traditional depletion/repletion cycles.

-2
03aeff8d87a3b53a449b5b8e9158da98

(3268)

on September 05, 2010
at 06:55 PM

Stephen, where did you get that data? Those numbers seem very high. I see you mentioned athletes, but I have yet to find a computation that takes muscle mass vs. bodyweight into account.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 06, 2010
at 12:39 AM

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/reprint/56/1/292S.pdf

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 06, 2010
at 12:40 AM

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1748-1716.1970.tb04764.x/abstract?systemMessage=Due+to+scheduled+maintenance+access+to+the+Wiley+Online+Library+may+be+disrupted+as+follows%3A+Monday%2C+6+September+-+New+York+0400+EDT+to+0500+EDT%3B+London+0900+BST+to+1000+BST%3B+Singapore+1600+to+1700

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 09:06 PM

An non-credible or made up source. The few studies I've reviewed on human glycogen content suggest a range of 50-250 mmol of glycogen per kg of wet muscle.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 06, 2010
at 12:41 AM

http://ajpendo.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/255/5/E621

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on September 05, 2010
at 09:13 PM

An non-credible or made up source. The few studies I've reviewed on human glycogen content suggest a range of 50-250 mmol of glycogen per kg of wet muscle, which puts stephan's answer a couple of orders of magnitude off target.

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