11

votes

How Do You Make Liver Palatable?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created August 03, 2011 at 4:07 AM

So what is the secret to eating liver and loving it? I've tried recipes that people swore even their kids loved, I've tried it in sausages, I've tried it in sandwich spreads. No matter what form I try it in as soon as I get a whiff of it my stomach just revolts. Is there a secret to eating liver? I'm about ready to give up on it, but I know it's so full of nutrients.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on February 11, 2012
at 04:09 AM

Seconded on pates palatibility. I do it with sherry and some bacon, and eat it straight.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 11, 2012
at 12:36 AM

Haha, this is always my strategy! I try and be super casual about eating foods I don't like- if someone bring a food to a party that I can't stand (used to be chicken livers wrapped in bacon, my aunts specialty, now I like it), I would make it a goal to eat it before the end of the night. Saunter over to the table, just put it in my mouth while I'm having a conversation so that I have to swallow it...gag all over the place. Worst house guest ever. My friends stopped bringing olives to parties (which I used to hate), because I'd always try and eat them and spit them all over the place. Fail.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 11, 2012
at 12:33 AM

I never understand how people don't like fish! I have picture of me as a toddler with my "pet" fish head (would steal it after dinner to play with it) and I used to try and eat the little crabs off the beach because I thought they were pretty much the same thing. I have a hard time with liver, but give me any kind of fish and any point in the day, I'm good to go! Clearly a coastal kid ;)

537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on January 27, 2012
at 10:48 PM

hah are you serious. he really hates liver

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 13, 2011
at 09:19 PM

I also find that I can't stand the taste of cooked liver, but raw liver is super delicious to me. So like you, I sear it on the outside but make sure it's not cooked on the inside. This method also cuts down on the smell and resultant complaining of housemates.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 07, 2011
at 04:33 AM

So I tried this for my first attempt at eating liver again since I was a kid, and... I made it through 3 good-sized bites and had to stop. The recipe is great, though. I was getting excited smelling the onions and that beefy smell cooking, then by the time I added balsamic vinegar I was definitely in the mood and ready to eat the meager 3 ounces of liver I had in the pan. But... ultimately it was the texture that got to me. The texture combined with the slightly different (but still beefy) flavor. The liver I bought is grassfed, though. May try to hide it in something else next!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on November 24, 2011
at 12:36 AM

This is the strangest trolling ever? Or is it serious? Hormel, canola oil, and fried wontons are not looked on to kindly in these parts.

Dc3b69c8fb8a28be888a7f24016837a2

on November 23, 2011
at 11:08 PM

chicken liver has twice the amount of iron compared to beef liver and is much safer to eat. always eat with citrus to improve iron absorption, calcium will inhibit. does the vinegar count?

Dc3b69c8fb8a28be888a7f24016837a2

on November 23, 2011
at 10:44 PM

after de-stringing celery slice fine across rib

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 24, 2011
at 04:46 PM

Awesome! Glad I could help! I, sadly, have not made it in a few months :( I need to get my hands on some grassfed calf's liver.

06325b762f78a2b8aaa977161cca4a1f

(539)

on August 23, 2011
at 10:05 PM

I've made this twice in the past 2 weeks! It's wicked good and easy to make. The adding of the balsamic vinegar is genius and has exponentially improved my liver eating experience. thanks :)

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 13, 2011
at 01:23 AM

Lol Nick! With, of course! Wonder how frozen pate cubes would taste?

77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on August 13, 2011
at 01:08 AM

Nemesis: what did you eat it on or with?

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 04, 2011
at 11:37 AM

I made some pate last night (first time ever) and while I didn't have all of the herbs I needed (sage, thyme & marjoram), I did have a stick of butter, seasonings and bourbon! Fried the livers in butter, garlic & seasonings until golden brown on each side, then poured everything into my Vitamix blender, and pureed until smooth. Scooped it out and stuck it in the fridge to cool. Tasted great with a glass of Shiraz! :)

B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

(3909)

on August 04, 2011
at 05:26 AM

Now that sounds like it just might be my answer. At the moment I don't have access to organic liver and what your saying about hormones, etc. giving it a strong odor makes logical sense.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 03, 2011
at 11:46 PM

I use a coarse nut flour like pecan meal, and if you fry cjicken livers in butter it turns a beautiful dark golden brown.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:59 PM

I always find that most of the coconut flour ends up blackening in the pan when I try and batter things with it... Any tricks?

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on August 03, 2011
at 03:36 PM

That sounds really good - I'll have to try it.

Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

(4286)

on August 03, 2011
at 03:11 PM

Thats more or less how I do it as well. Most offal really turns me off, but if you can hide it in ground beef, you get the benefit without having to choke it down.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:16 AM

I find chicken livers to be much stronger in flavor than beef liver!

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 03, 2011
at 04:57 AM

I like that chili idea, I've been looking for something to replace the bean texture.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on August 03, 2011
at 04:45 AM

soak it in an acidic medium for a few hours and it gets easier to eat. Learn to like the flavor. It's like riding a bike. You fall down and get scratched up but eventually you learn to ride without falling. And by that I mean you like it.

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36 Answers

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4
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 03, 2011
at 11:38 AM

The only liver I can bring myself to eat is organic chicken liver. The regular ones (full of god knows what) have a strong smell. One thing to take into consideration is the quality of livers you're buying. The typical grain-fed/hormone-injected livestock organ meats don't taste good. Livers and kidneys from these animals I would not eat, as they are the two major toxin-filtering organs in the body! If that's the kind you're getting, it may have a stronger taste. I've also heard that some people just can't tolerate the taste nor texture of cow liver, but can deal with chicken liver because it's milder and more tender.

To me, chicken liver tastes like canned corned beef hash (Hormel). Good thing I like hash! lol

Have you tried making a pate? It's got lots of butter & spices (even liquor!).

B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

(3909)

on August 04, 2011
at 05:26 AM

Now that sounds like it just might be my answer. At the moment I don't have access to organic liver and what your saying about hormones, etc. giving it a strong odor makes logical sense.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 04, 2011
at 11:37 AM

I made some pate last night (first time ever) and while I didn't have all of the herbs I needed (sage, thyme & marjoram), I did have a stick of butter, seasonings and bourbon! Fried the livers in butter, garlic & seasonings until golden brown on each side, then poured everything into my Vitamix blender, and pureed until smooth. Scooped it out and stuck it in the fridge to cool. Tasted great with a glass of Shiraz! :)

77ecc37f89dbe8f783179323916bd8e6

(5002)

on August 13, 2011
at 01:08 AM

Nemesis: what did you eat it on or with?

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 13, 2011
at 01:23 AM

Lol Nick! With, of course! Wonder how frozen pate cubes would taste?

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on February 11, 2012
at 04:09 AM

Seconded on pates palatibility. I do it with sherry and some bacon, and eat it straight.

15
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:41 AM

Blend about 8oz liver with 1/2 an onion in a blender, add this to about 2 lbs of good hamburger, add 3-4 eggs, chopped onion, about 6 sliced cooked bacon (chopped up) add spices (salt, pepper, etc) - mix together, form into patties, fry them up, melt cheese on top, cover with fresh guacamole or salsa.

This gets liver into anyone who hates it - cannot be smelt or tasted this way :) My son loves these burgers, we wrap them in lettuce leaves instead of a bun.

Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

(4286)

on August 03, 2011
at 03:11 PM

Thats more or less how I do it as well. Most offal really turns me off, but if you can hide it in ground beef, you get the benefit without having to choke it down.

7
B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on August 03, 2011
at 04:54 AM

Chris Kresser can't stomach the liver either, he cuts it up into pill size chunks, freezes it and swallows it whole.

537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on January 27, 2012
at 10:48 PM

hah are you serious. he really hates liver

5
76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on August 03, 2011
at 02:27 PM

First I remove the outer membrane thingy. Then I cut the liver into strips and soak them in lemon juice for a couple of hours. I then dip them in egg, followed by coconut flour, and cover them with insane amounts of garlic powder, sea salt, black pepper, and sometimes cayenne pepper. Sear them in tons of butter (don't overcook - shoe leather is gross!). Delicious.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on August 03, 2011
at 11:46 PM

I use a coarse nut flour like pecan meal, and if you fry cjicken livers in butter it turns a beautiful dark golden brown.

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on August 03, 2011
at 03:36 PM

That sounds really good - I'll have to try it.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:59 PM

I always find that most of the coconut flour ends up blackening in the pan when I try and batter things with it... Any tricks?

5
6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on August 03, 2011
at 06:09 AM

Tell yourself you like it as you eat it. Conjure up feelings of adornment as you're eating. Repeat until liver eventually becomes associated with pleasurable feelings.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 11, 2012
at 12:36 AM

Haha, this is always my strategy! I try and be super casual about eating foods I don't like- if someone bring a food to a party that I can't stand (used to be chicken livers wrapped in bacon, my aunts specialty, now I like it), I would make it a goal to eat it before the end of the night. Saunter over to the table, just put it in my mouth while I'm having a conversation so that I have to swallow it...gag all over the place. Worst house guest ever. My friends stopped bringing olives to parties (which I used to hate), because I'd always try and eat them and spit them all over the place. Fail.

5
306905a32e76b5c0764a663ea7e88426

(1072)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:12 AM

A great British tradition [still seen in cafes] is liver'n'bacon.

Rinse and pat dry your liver and thinly slice, meanwhile get some onions and spices sauteing and start to cook the bacon. You'll want your cooking oil of choice at a relatively high heat as the best way to do liver is to flash fry it.

When the bacon's done to your desired level, throw the liver in and keep moving. It should take no more than two minutes to be done, and flash frying should avoid the chewy texture I remember from childhood. Serve with whatever greenery you choose. Melt butter on top. Enjoy!

Now if someone wants to do a paleo version of another childhood memory - steak and kidney pie - I'd me eternally grateful :)

5
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 03, 2011
at 04:20 AM

I've found not overcooking it to be the most important thing. I now only cook it to medium and both the taste and texture are much improved. Also, calf liver is a lot less "livery".

I accidentally made the yummiest dinner I've had in while the other night by putting a mighty generous pat of butter and some garlic puree into a hot skillet and then threw in a bunch of chicken livers cooked them just until they were heated through, but not quite brown in the middle. They were divine right out of the pan, but later after cooling, icko. Eat 'em fresh.

If you really just don't like liver flavor, you can mix a few frozen chunks of it in a blender with some frozen strawberries or cherries, then put it in a drink cup with a lid (so you can't smell the liver), and drink it through a straw.

4
Medium avatar

on August 03, 2011
at 05:04 AM

Grassfed Calf Liver!

First marinate in lemon juice for about 15 minutes.

While it's marinating, sautee some onions in a frying pan, over low heat in some ghee. Dice some good organic bacon and toss that in the pan. Add 1/8 tsp sage and a small sprig of rosemary.

Next drain the liver and cut it into 2" by 2" pieces. Add it to the pan, raise heat to med-high, and cook for 3-5 minutes or until liver is med-rare. Finish with a couple splashes (maybe 4 TBs? sorry, I don't measure anything when I cook) of good balsamic vinegar. Remove the liver to a pan, and let the bacon, onions and balsamic reduce to a nice sauce, spoon on top of liver and YUMMMMMMMM!

06325b762f78a2b8aaa977161cca4a1f

(539)

on August 23, 2011
at 10:05 PM

I've made this twice in the past 2 weeks! It's wicked good and easy to make. The adding of the balsamic vinegar is genius and has exponentially improved my liver eating experience. thanks :)

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 24, 2011
at 04:46 PM

Awesome! Glad I could help! I, sadly, have not made it in a few months :( I need to get my hands on some grassfed calf's liver.

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 07, 2011
at 04:33 AM

So I tried this for my first attempt at eating liver again since I was a kid, and... I made it through 3 good-sized bites and had to stop. The recipe is great, though. I was getting excited smelling the onions and that beefy smell cooking, then by the time I added balsamic vinegar I was definitely in the mood and ready to eat the meager 3 ounces of liver I had in the pan. But... ultimately it was the texture that got to me. The texture combined with the slightly different (but still beefy) flavor. The liver I bought is grassfed, though. May try to hide it in something else next!

3
E7a462d6e99fec7e8f0ddda11b34a770

(1638)

on August 03, 2011
at 01:39 PM

Liver to me has always smelled and tasted like spoiled meat which is an issue I can't get past. The problem with most of these suggestions is that they rely on the flavor of onions to help with the taste of the liver. I DON'T LIKE ONIONS. Never have and, since I am now almost 60, probably never will. Of course, now that I live alone, I never have to cook with them again!

I vote for the Chris Kresser approach noted above - freezing small diced pieces and downing a few a day with my other pills.

3
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on August 03, 2011
at 04:17 AM

Honestly? If you've tried it in numerous forms that other people swear by with the same result each time, you probably just don't like it. That's ok. There are other nutrient-rich foods out there. Get cod liver oil capsules if you're really concerned.

However, you can try slicing it thinly, frying it just enough to cook it thoroughly, chop up and throw it in the food processor with enough cocoa to disguise the taste, sweetener, and coconut milk (or cream, if you're that sort) until you get a good mousse-y consistency (or thinner, like a milkshake, if you prefer). Freezing the results in an ice cream maker would probably help even more, but I haven't personally tried that part. If the smell during cooking is enough to be a problem, have someone else make it for you.

It also goes well in chili, which has a strong enough flavor that the liver isn't particularly noticeable. It thickens it nicely, and if you have small chunks, it serves as a good texture-replacement for beans.

(Personally, I found that my dislike of liver was actually 100% societal programming, and I actually love liver. But that doesn't mean someone else can't legitimately dislike it.)

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 03, 2011
at 04:57 AM

I like that chili idea, I've been looking for something to replace the bean texture.

2
0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on February 10, 2012
at 10:32 PM

I just tried liver straight up grilled in the cast iron skillet (second attempt) and it turned out great this time. It could be my paleo taste-buds changing, but it actually came out tasty and enjoyable!

The first time I tried grilling it in the pan back in November I had soaked it in lemon juice for awhile and then cooked it with onions and served it up with balsamic vinegar. I couldn't get past the 3rd bite. Since then I have been dicing it up and adding it to stews and roasts, which helped me get it down easier.

Here is what changed:

I've been getting a bit of practice cooking grass-fed steaks in the last couple months, so I decided to prepare and cook a slice of grass-fed liver in a similar manner to how I've been doing steaks.

First, I let the liver thaw for a bit on the counter and then rinsed it in cold water a couple times once it started to loosen up all the way through.

Next I lightly sprinkled sea salt on both sides of the liver and let it sit for just 5 more minutes, then I rinsed off the salt with cold water and patted it completely dry with paper towels. By this point, the liver was room temperature and very tender and floppy.

I then added some coconut oil to the cast-iron skillet that had been warming up to medium-low and put the liver in the pan. I was going to do 1 minute per side, but after the first side was done the purple strip on the edge looked more than half gone, so I did 1 minute on the first side and 30 seconds on the other side (I'll try 45 seconds each side next time). While searing the second side I melted a small bit of Kerrygold butter at the edge of the skillet and basted it over the liver until it was finished.

I let it set up on a plate for a few minutes, then sliced it through the middle. The outside looked kind of like a steak, and the inside came out light brown with a light purple center. It was very tender, not chewy or gritty, and best of all it tasted really good! The flavor was a bit meatier but very similar to the grass-fed steak I've been eating.

So for now it looks like I'll be cooking up liver with my steak once or twice a week. I'm so excited!

2
93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on October 12, 2011
at 01:35 PM

Just plain old liver, any old liver, rinse off the excess blood, throw it in you skillet, flip it around as it gets slightly pale on the outside, but leave it bloody on the inside. No need for marinade or basting or onions of anything else. Your favorite grease in the pan, that's all that's added. nothin tastes better.

But then, I just ate two heaping plates of dak dae bugs last night, so what do I know?

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 13, 2011
at 09:19 PM

I also find that I can't stand the taste of cooked liver, but raw liver is super delicious to me. So like you, I sear it on the outside but make sure it's not cooked on the inside. This method also cuts down on the smell and resultant complaining of housemates.

2
Ea776df66c8277321b167e2ee3f22574

on August 03, 2011
at 09:43 PM

Saute in butter or olive oil, add sweet onions and bacon... yum! Oh and don't forget the curry powder!

2
35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on August 03, 2011
at 08:24 PM

  1. Get good grassfed liver. This is not snobbish, the grocery store liver reminds me of a slab of leeches, but the grassfed stuff is much more like proper meat.

  2. Cut a jalapeno in half & core it. Cut off two pieces of liver about the size of the jalapeno, and put a chunk of liver in each half. Wrap jalapeno/liver in bacon & secure with a toothpick. Throw on the BBQ, until the bacon is cooked.

2
Fd504de9b242f4cd7009db70af5e2121

(558)

on August 03, 2011
at 01:01 PM

I eat the Braunshwager (sp) from Grasslandbeef

2
8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

on August 03, 2011
at 11:26 AM

I haven't learned to like liver yet, BUT I have hated - hated - fish all my life (taste, appearance, texture, the whole shebang), and yesterday I totally relished whole, skin-on, vertebrae-containing sardines right out of the can. When I first tried eating sardines a year or so ago, they absolutely revolted me. So there is hope for liver and me, and for liver and you. :)

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 11, 2012
at 12:33 AM

I never understand how people don't like fish! I have picture of me as a toddler with my "pet" fish head (would steal it after dinner to play with it) and I used to try and eat the little crabs off the beach because I thought they were pretty much the same thing. I have a hard time with liver, but give me any kind of fish and any point in the day, I'm good to go! Clearly a coastal kid ;)

2
Da927135a179400e0928bd640841d10a

on August 03, 2011
at 09:33 AM

Make it into pate.... then it is divine food of the gods.

Also, check your stomach acid- you have enough?

2
B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6

(566)

on August 03, 2011
at 06:13 AM

I grew up absolutely hating liver and now I sometimes crave it: weird. Anyhow, calves liver, quickly sauteed in butter that has already fried up some onions is great.

1
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 11, 2012
at 12:42 AM

The only liver recipe we ever ate as kids was chicken liver marinated in a mixture of lemon juice, soy sauce and garlic, then wrapped in partially cooked bacon, put in the oven and cook quickly until the bacon is just crisp. We always loved it, excuse to eat more bacon right? I still prepare liver this way, or do the standard sneak-it-in-ground-beef strategy.

1
Dc3b69c8fb8a28be888a7f24016837a2

on November 23, 2011
at 10:23 PM

1/2 # of fresh chicken livers, do not use beef or pork, (it's true organs hold toxins but chickens don't live that long)

3/4 # hormel little sizzlers nicely browned and crumbled well (squeeze) or could be any pork sausage that you like that isn't too spicy

1 large sweet onion finely diced

4 stalks of celery (peel the outside and then strip ribs by snapping the top of the rib and pulling down to de-string)

3 large peeled carrots (cut fine 1" strips,i have a peeler that does YES)

NOW! TO ACHIEVE THE "I DON'T WANT IT TO TASTE LIKE DIRTY GYM SOCKS SMELL"

1 T. balsamic vinegar 2 T. sugar 3 T. soy sauce 1/4 c sesame seeds or 1 T. sesame oil 1 t. garlic powder 1 t. cumin

2 chicken bouillon cubes (no msg) 1 c water

boil the water and put in the bouillon cubes to dissolve put the liver in with them. when this mixture is cooler!, squeeze the liver and take out any membrane strings, (it's not easy but it's worth it)

brown the sausage well and remove from pan and cool!, then you will squeeze them to crumble fine

in the meantime

brown the onions in the sausage fry pan put in the celery first to continue to fry and then the carrots

add the liver/bouillon mixture make sure it is cooked

add other ingredients and mix well

what you want to attain is no liver after taste!

fiddle with until you are HAPPY

stuff this by t. into won ton wrappers

or use this recipe in any other way your anemic grandchild will eat

check net to find out how to stuff and fry won tons

fry in canola oil however many you want at the time

you can freeze, but don't cook won tons before freezing first brush outside of won ton with oil and freeze separately then you can combine in a plastic bag

I WISH YOU MANY HAPPY HEALTHY GRANDKIDS

Organic Acids Influence Iron Uptake in the Human Epithelial Cell Line Caco-2

Susan Salovaara, Ann-Sofie Sandberg, and Thomas Andlid* Department of Food Science, Chalmers University of Technology, P.O. Box 5401, SE-402 29 G??teborg, Sweden J. Agric. Food Chem., 2002, 50 (21), pp 6233???6238 DOI: 10.1021/jf0203040 Publication Date (Web): September 14, 2002 Copyright ?? 2002 American Chemical Society Section: Food and Feed Chemistry Abstract

It has previously been suggested that organic acids enhance iron absorption. We have studied the effect of nine organic acids on the absorption of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in the human epithelial cell line Caco-2. The effect obtained was dose-dependent, and the greatest increase (43-fold) was observed for tartaric acid (4 mmol/L) on Fe(III) (10 ??mol/L). Tartaric, malic, succinic, and fumaric acids enhanced Fe(II) and Fe(III) uptake. Citric and oxalic acid, on the other hand, inhibited Fe(II) uptake but enhanced Fe(III) uptake. Propionic and acetic acid increased the Fe(II) uptake, but had no effect on Fe(III) uptake. Our results show a correlation between absorption pattern and chemical structure; e.g. hydroxyl groups, in addition to carboxyls, were connected with a positive influence. The results may be important for elucidating factors affecting iron bioavailability in the small intestine and for the development of foods with improved iron bioavailability.

Keywords: organic acids; iron absorption; Caco-2

Dc3b69c8fb8a28be888a7f24016837a2

on November 23, 2011
at 11:08 PM

chicken liver has twice the amount of iron compared to beef liver and is much safer to eat. always eat with citrus to improve iron absorption, calcium will inhibit. does the vinegar count?

Dc3b69c8fb8a28be888a7f24016837a2

on November 23, 2011
at 10:44 PM

after de-stringing celery slice fine across rib

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on November 24, 2011
at 12:36 AM

This is the strangest trolling ever? Or is it serious? Hormel, canola oil, and fried wontons are not looked on to kindly in these parts.

1
138be7a21edcd70c350bdebfd05948db

on August 12, 2011
at 02:33 PM

I cook some grass fed beef liver for the first time yesterday and really researched how to cook it before doing to so it would taste good. I still couldn't stand it! I wanted to barf just smelling the liver. After cooking the liver and knowing I wouldn't eat it, I tried the cocoa thing mentioned above but made a muffing type thing instead. I threw the cooked liver in the blendtec with 1/2 cup cocoa powder, 1/4 cup almond flour, 1/4 cup coconut flour, 1 large cooked sweet potato peeled, 4 eggs, a little bit of coconut cream, dash of baking soda, cinnamon and some stevia. I baked it for 30 minutes until it cooked into a muffin. It still tasted a bit like liver but it was much more tolerable! To those of you wanted to add more liver to your diet, give this method a shot.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:54 PM

I'm lucky, I guess, because I like liver as long as it's mild. I do the following:

*Fry a few pieces of bacon first *Find a source of tender liver--your fingers should just about pierce through the liver when you pick up a piece *Fry the liver in the bacon fat *30 seconds before removing the liver from the pan, put in a little water (the pan should be hot enough to generate a loud hiss of steam) and cover for 2 minutes. *Eat the liver with the bacon.

The steam treatment takes out a lot of the liver flavor. These days, I'm eating so much liver I skip the steam if it's nice and tender raw. In the old days, I had to steam it because I didn't like the taste of liver.

1
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on August 03, 2011
at 11:29 AM

Add a tiny amount of liver to ground beef and you won't know it's there. I have also done the "frozen pill" method already mentioned. Sometimes I just quick fry a small piece and down it as quick as I can.

1
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on August 03, 2011
at 04:55 AM

Begin with chicken livers, then graduate to goat or lamb and finally to beef liver. Goat/lamb liver is milder but equally nutrient rich if you find beef too livery.

The way I cook it is using plenty of ghee/butter and a generous pinch of cumin seeds. Don't over cook it. Start with liver thawed well, preferably room temperature, throw in some chopped onions in the pan with the liver and cumin seeds, when the onion is translucent, the liver is done.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:16 AM

I find chicken livers to be much stronger in flavor than beef liver!

1
B2f2a025c9901b31af3853d1336d5307

on August 03, 2011
at 04:39 AM

coat it in chocolate?

0
D73413d7f08d9d2ec4a8f834fdf09c05

on September 22, 2012
at 03:51 AM

I Don't know that you still look into this topic anymore just in case you see it

Soak liver with medium or salt water squeeze those blood old until it's turn to white pale

Now it's important find some cloth make it wet ( not too wet just almost dry ) boil the water wait until it boil then put the liver into it and turn off the strove after 30sec Cover it with cloth and leave it for 40 min That's all hope this could help

0
7f1e48db1bee85b9ef8a4bc4baedd044

on August 26, 2012
at 07:04 AM

Dry age it. It will taste a bit like cheese.

0
963322f175cdd4c5f7d52cc372b3a167

on August 26, 2012
at 06:56 AM

By throwing it in the trash. That's the only way I know.

0
429e01b74c31847aed3af35ef9973256

(427)

on August 26, 2012
at 06:42 AM

Drench it in bacon, onions, butter, salt, pepper, etc. It might be an acquired taste which means you just have to keep eating it until you like it.

0
7f1e48db1bee85b9ef8a4bc4baedd044

on August 26, 2012
at 06:25 AM

Dry age it. It will taste a bit like cheese.

0
3c997ffae3db9464325b96979346d9e9

on August 26, 2012
at 01:48 AM

Eat it raw, far milder a taste and most nutrition. Slice it, use a food processor on it and then eat it with a spoon.

0
C2b6ff6a28f692eb2d4c08e6865718e9

on August 26, 2012
at 12:42 AM

Rinse it in cold water, drain it, put it in bowl and pour enough milk in to cover the liver. Let set for at least an hour. It gets rid of the bitter taste.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 21, 2012
at 09:44 PM

I've just tried this recipe, and it came out awesome, much better than any other bison liver recipe. Highly recommended.

0
B439aa0697b8603be3148d885a635d19

(0)

on January 21, 2012
at 09:36 PM

My children who are grown now ask me to make them liver and onions for their birthday meals. I don't care for liver so I have experimented cooking it in different ways. First off, I cook a lot of onions in olive oil and a little butter until they are tender but not brown. I set the onions aside. I save my bacon grease when ever I make bacon. I brown my liver in hot bacon grease for about 5 minutes on each side. After cooking the liver I make a brown gravy (you can use the brown gravy in an envelope) too or make it from scratch. I add a can of cream of mushroom soup to my gravy. I then add my liver to my gravy and simmer it using a low temperature either in the oven or in an electric skillet. The liver will be so tender it melts in your mouth. Then I put the onions over the top to serve. But you can't have liver and onions without mashed potatoes. I don't know about buying the liver that has no chemicals in it. We only eat this meal once a year if that. I always make another meat as well for those of us who don't like liver. I do take a bite or two though to see how it turned out. Hope this helps anyone who eats liver. JC from Nebraska

0
00a74b5c498e9fdc7ec56abbc8b9f4d0

(0)

on October 12, 2011
at 05:37 AM

Dip the chicken livers in egg then into a batter of flaxseed meal mixed with almond flour, paprika, oregano and pepper. Fry them in clarified butter until all the redness is gone. Pour the rest of the egg over them until that cooks too. Remove from the pan onto a plate to cool. While they are cooling sprinkle with fresh lemon. They taste great warm and even better after sitting in the 'fridge.

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