3

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Forcing the Liver to work harder?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 14, 2011 at 1:10 PM

Conundrum posed to me was that by restricting dietary carbs and "forcing" the liver to pretty much "create" them out of fats, the liver is actually performing a function that it "can, but shouldn't do" and that was extra wear and tear on the poor organ that it doesn't need.

The liver is supposed to "clean" not create.

I've been searching all over for evidence on High Protein/LC and liver damage or strain but not seeing much.

Ideas? And thanks! Loving the community spirit here.

095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on August 17, 2011
at 03:50 AM

I meant that it's less efficient, as it was designed to be. yes it has more calories 9 as compared to 6. But it's more difficult for the body to metabolize and to use, it takes more calories to burn a gram of fat than it does a gram of protein or carbohydrate. The body works harder to use it, hence the preference for carbs...they are easier energy, and the simpler ... the easier to use. Inefficient does not mean inferior though. Because it's harder to utilize, it does last longer....taking longer to burn as you stated. :)

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 15, 2011
at 01:49 AM

I haven't seen any hard evidence that gluconeogenesis puts a strain on the liver. But that doesn't mean that it doesn't. Mark Sisson and Peter Dombrovsky generally recommend enogh carbs to stay just out of ketosis (or go in and out), or greater than 50g. The Jaminets recommend 100g so as to avoid unecessary gluconeogenesis.

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on August 15, 2011
at 12:55 AM

Actually fat is a more efficient fuel. You get more than twice as much energy per gram. I think you meant to say that it takes more time to burn it than it does carbs.

095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on August 14, 2011
at 11:34 PM

It's all good. If you don't eat an excessive amount of protein you should be fine. The liver really isn't stressed by the conversion and it's the primary storage of glycogen. You can only store 15g/kg of LBM of glycogen in your muscles and liver. Beyond that, it's turned into fat for long term storage. If you aren't eating more than 1g/lb of lean body mass...you are not overdoing it. Maybe even up to 1.5g/lb of LBM if you are doing very heavy weight training and having to eat a lot of calories to build muscle.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on August 14, 2011
at 03:06 PM

Beat me to it. Who decided that the job of the liver is to "clean not create"? From Wikipedia: "This organ plays a major role in metabolism and has a number of functions in the body, including glycogen storage, decomposition of red blood cells, plasma protein synthesis, hormone production, and detoxification."

98f904aa2ce5f901c378aeec345701a0

(73)

on August 14, 2011
at 02:21 PM

Protein is what I meant..not fat...really... :) New to the ideas

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3 Answers

8
7f7069fc4d8d2456cec509d0f9e9bb34

(865)

on August 14, 2011
at 02:13 PM

The liver does more things that we have discovered. It does over 600 KNOWN functions, and does them well if left alone. The liver is a monster of an organ and will serve you well through your life. I ides that you can bully your liver and "force" it to do what it is not designed to do is ridiculous. It is much more than a filter/blood cleaner, just as the kidneys are much more. It creates hormones, cholesterol, etc and has a secondary function to clean the body that gets overstressed b/c of the alcohol/liver connection. But the liver does everything and is the only organ that can regenerate itself. Toxic load is much more of an issue than glycogen creation, imo.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on August 14, 2011
at 03:06 PM

Beat me to it. Who decided that the job of the liver is to "clean not create"? From Wikipedia: "This organ plays a major role in metabolism and has a number of functions in the body, including glycogen storage, decomposition of red blood cells, plasma protein synthesis, hormone production, and detoxification."

7
095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on August 14, 2011
at 02:10 PM

Fat cannot be converted to carbohydrate. Protein can, it's called glucogenesis. That's why I usually eat a higher fat diet when low carbing it rather than a high protein diet. Most of us really don't need more than 35% of our calories to come from protein (that's about 1g/lb of lean body mass for most). Protein is of course needed for muscle synthesis and repair but not really for energy. In fact, excess protein must be converted to carbohydrate before it can be used for energy, or stored for use later (protein that has been converted to carbohydrate is burned for fuel, or is stored as glycogen, and later as fat if the glycogen stores are full). Fat on the other hand can be utilized directly for energy. It's inefficient fuel, not easy like carbohydrate, but if we keep our body in a fat burning metabolism then we don't have to worry about fat gains, overtaxing the kidneys (not liver) with excessive protein consumption, causing health problems like DMII, heart disease, vascular disease, or autoimmune diseases by excessive carbohydrate consumption.

98f904aa2ce5f901c378aeec345701a0

(73)

on August 14, 2011
at 02:21 PM

Protein is what I meant..not fat...really... :) New to the ideas

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on August 15, 2011
at 12:55 AM

Actually fat is a more efficient fuel. You get more than twice as much energy per gram. I think you meant to say that it takes more time to burn it than it does carbs.

095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on August 14, 2011
at 11:34 PM

It's all good. If you don't eat an excessive amount of protein you should be fine. The liver really isn't stressed by the conversion and it's the primary storage of glycogen. You can only store 15g/kg of LBM of glycogen in your muscles and liver. Beyond that, it's turned into fat for long term storage. If you aren't eating more than 1g/lb of lean body mass...you are not overdoing it. Maybe even up to 1.5g/lb of LBM if you are doing very heavy weight training and having to eat a lot of calories to build muscle.

095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on August 17, 2011
at 03:50 AM

I meant that it's less efficient, as it was designed to be. yes it has more calories 9 as compared to 6. But it's more difficult for the body to metabolize and to use, it takes more calories to burn a gram of fat than it does a gram of protein or carbohydrate. The body works harder to use it, hence the preference for carbs...they are easier energy, and the simpler ... the easier to use. Inefficient does not mean inferior though. Because it's harder to utilize, it does last longer....taking longer to burn as you stated. :)

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on August 14, 2011
at 05:44 PM

If you eat too much fructose you can get non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and then your liver is really compromised...

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