2

votes

elevated liver numbers

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 10, 2011 at 11:51 PM

i have heard that people who are on a paleo diet have slightly higher liver numbers than the norm. I know the norm for a female is 0-29. Would slightly elevated be close to 100 or would it be in the 30's or 40's?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 06, 2011
at 11:14 AM

Egg yolks can help with NASH via choline. So I'd add eats loads of pastured eggs (or at least the yolks.)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 24, 2011
at 06:22 AM

I plateaued at BMI ~ 25 (193cm, 93kg)

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on September 24, 2011
at 02:59 AM

Good job. I think they still have to come down somewhat. But your AST is coming down nicely. Is your weight coming down too or have you plateaued?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 23, 2011
at 07:25 PM

if you cut your protein intake, then those results are not relevant for you.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 23, 2011
at 07:25 PM

Sucrose is not just 1/2 fructose since you need to break it, and for that you need adequate levels. Different individuals produce different levels of this enzyme. Also "the diurnal variation of sucrase activity revealed that the activity in the morning was significantly higher than at noon or at later sampling times of the day" which means that when you eat sucrose also determines level of absorption. So, fructose is worst then sucrose.

2ed23cf27c64885cde34138fd708f523

(70)

on April 11, 2011
at 01:26 PM

I didn't mean to imply that - only that because acetaminophen damages the liver (as NASH does) it raises liver enzymes. My apologies if I was unclear.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 12:59 AM

Acetaminophen is not generally considered to lead to NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, e.g. "fatty liver"). In children with Reye's syndrome aspirin and possibly acetaminophen can be factors in the development of NASH. Also, while fructose is processed by the liver, it is mainly the effects on insulin that are the issue, not the "being hard on the liver" part. I mean it is hard on the liver, but that is an effect, not the cause.

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10 Answers

1
2ed23cf27c64885cde34138fd708f523

(70)

on April 11, 2011
at 12:45 AM

Is this a hypothetical question, or did your liver enzymes go up after starting Paleo? If anything, I would think liver enzymes should go DOWN.

It's very common for high-carbers to have fat deposits in their livers (fatty liver infiltration), and that will increase the liver enzymes. (I had this, and it went away on Paleo.) If you stop ingesting things that hurt your liver (fructose, sugar (because it's 1/2 fructose), alcohol, tylenol), your liver can gradually heal itself and the enzymes will go down.

I would think your BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen, which is a marker of kidney function) could go up a little from the extra protein, but not enough to go out of range.

2ed23cf27c64885cde34138fd708f523

(70)

on April 11, 2011
at 01:26 PM

I didn't mean to imply that - only that because acetaminophen damages the liver (as NASH does) it raises liver enzymes. My apologies if I was unclear.

9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 12:59 AM

Acetaminophen is not generally considered to lead to NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, e.g. "fatty liver"). In children with Reye's syndrome aspirin and possibly acetaminophen can be factors in the development of NASH. Also, while fructose is processed by the liver, it is mainly the effects on insulin that are the issue, not the "being hard on the liver" part. I mean it is hard on the liver, but that is an effect, not the cause.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 23, 2011
at 07:25 PM

Sucrose is not just 1/2 fructose since you need to break it, and for that you need adequate levels. Different individuals produce different levels of this enzyme. Also "the diurnal variation of sucrase activity revealed that the activity in the morning was significantly higher than at noon or at later sampling times of the day" which means that when you eat sucrose also determines level of absorption. So, fructose is worst then sucrose.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 06, 2011
at 11:14 AM

Egg yolks can help with NASH via choline. So I'd add eats loads of pastured eggs (or at least the yolks.)

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 23, 2011
at 07:35 PM

My ALT/AST is far better since starting low carb close to paleo diet. Here are results in last 5 years in U/L (ranges from lab are also given). Only last year is on diet.

ALT: 41↑ (10-35), 50 (0-55), 49 (0-55), 32  (-42), 30 (0-55)
AST: 30  ( 5-34), 26 (5-34), 19 (5-34), 44↑ (<37), 18 (5-34)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 24, 2011
at 06:22 AM

I plateaued at BMI ~ 25 (193cm, 93kg)

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on September 24, 2011
at 02:59 AM

Good job. I think they still have to come down somewhat. But your AST is coming down nicely. Is your weight coming down too or have you plateaued?

0
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on August 12, 2011
at 05:26 AM

eating lots of raw vegetable carries an inherent risk of eating hepatitis contaminated raw food. to my knowledge this would be the only risk for elevated liver enzymes on the paleo diet. To reduce the risk wash your raw foods or cook them. i have been vaccinated, i eat mine raw. Paleo rules.

0
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on August 12, 2011
at 05:19 AM

i have never heard of a liver number, the question sounds incomplete but i will add that the enzymes of liver origin are indicative of the cellular turnover rate of liver cells. i have not herd that the paleo diet increase liver cellular turnover rates.

0
32d5f078d1a719fd49f61635fe41dd62

on June 21, 2011
at 05:53 AM

Yea, I also had a scare with this too. I've been Paleo for about 2 years now and the last time I had my blood work done my doctor made me run a bunch of tests on my kidney and liver bc my numbers were high. I told specifically what my diet looked like to the letter. I think they were elevated at the time because I was on a strength cycle and had increased my protein intake drastically. I as well was not drinking alcohol or eating fruit. At 23 and a female, I think he was just nervous to see the spike in my liver enzymes but because of the high fat and high protein the liver and kidney have to work hard to keep up! After the test results came back everything showed to be fine, because I was... I say keep truckin and don't worry about it. I am just fine, strength is up bf% is down. I love being paleo and if my liver enzyme count is a little high as a result I just say hey, It's because I have a superior liver and can beat you in Fran ;) keep at it!

0
3fc07ff31006b1860083f0cfe4472ae4

(561)

on June 21, 2011
at 04:41 AM

I don't want to cause alarm but make sure you can rule out hepatitis. I had SGPT levels at 50 last fall. My SGOT was normal at 40. That's not super elevated but it was an indicator of disease.

So I just want to offer a caution to make sure you can rule it out. Friends generally remark at how healthy, good I look for my age and I feel good--so I would have never guessed in a million years I had a virus.

I have no idea how I got it--probably had it for years, but thankfully I have a doctor who has a functional med approach and is politicized (she thinks men are generally more readily tested in the medical world than women) and thus she tested me for hepatitis even w/those small liver elevations--and I'm thankful she did. And as luck would have it there are new drugs on the market this month that vastly improve the treatment.

Also, FYI, I was eating paleo at the time of that first test and was not eating fruit, alcohol or other liver unfriendly foods--though I was eating about 50% fat, 25% protein, 25% carbs at the time.

Good luck!

0
3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

on May 24, 2011
at 02:36 AM

Depending on what kind of Paleo you're doing. Your liver enzymes (and here I strictly mean your AST/ALT) should go down. If you were on a high-carb diet before, you likely had elevated liver enzymes. You might have even had fatty liver, which frequently precedes type 2 diabetes. If you are on a low-carb Paleo diet, your AST and ALT should fall to the teens: that's right, like 10-20, and your triglycerides should be between 50 and 100.

I used to have NASH (fatty live) and my ALT would exceed 100. That's a significant danger sign and portends T2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. However, unlike diabetes, it's completely reversible. Now, my ALT is around 15.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 23, 2011
at 07:25 PM

if you cut your protein intake, then those results are not relevant for you.

0
22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on May 09, 2011
at 06:54 PM

High protein consumption can cause you liver numbers to be elevated. When ever I do my blood work for my job (required every other year and everything has to be normal) I cut my protein intake by half for 3 days prior. Also, if you didn't fast for at least 12 hours it can cause it to elevate.

Overall, I wouldn't be concerned.

0
39a1a0bc7855c084ac59df60fdf9c0dd

(1505)

on April 11, 2011
at 05:41 PM

My AST, ALT and tris were extremely high - dangerously high - in December. After 75 days on Paleo they all dropped down to the middle of the "normal" category.

Alcohol and ibuprofen can cause elevated liver panels. If you're using either try laying off for a month and then having them tested again.

0
9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on April 11, 2011
at 12:09 AM

There are a number of different things an LFT is looking at. An ALP of 100, normal. ALT of 100, a little elevated, probably not a big deal depending on the rest of the clinical picture. TBIL at 100, you probably are going to need a new liver....

So "normal" lab values depend on which enzyme we're talking about. And even then, clinicians can probably argue over normal vs 1 or 2x normal as being optimal.

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