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Chicken heart and liver

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 30, 2010 at 3:16 PM

Today I saw that in the asian food shop they sell chicken hearts and livers. Two questions:

Is it a good idea to try these? Or is it meant as cat and dog food?

Do you have any favorite recipes or ideas on how to prepare them?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on August 14, 2010
at 10:22 PM

Lisa, low and slow will do it. dice it up small and braise in a 250 oven for a good 5 or 6 six hours and itll be tender and not-too-heart-y.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on August 14, 2010
at 04:10 AM

Just got me some beef heart (and Liver)...I also love chicken hearts and livers. But, I have never cooked the beef heart and I have the entire heart...I cut it in half. My mom says some people cook them whole like a roast.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on July 01, 2010
at 06:11 PM

update: I just made my first chicken hearts. Fried in butter, onion and mushroom, some spices and (I couldn't resist), just a splash of read wine. Lovely! Nice chewy meat and the sauce tasted like I added chicken stock. Definitely something to remember. Thanks for all the suggestions.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on July 01, 2010
at 06:10 PM

update: I just made my first chicken heart. Fried in butter, onion and mushroom, some spices and (I couldn't resist), just a splash of read wine. Lovely! Nice chewy meat and the sauce tasted like I added chicken stock. Definitely something to remember. Thanks for all the suggestions.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on June 30, 2010
at 08:05 PM

I bought the hearts, because of the milder flavor of heart. Liver will be next.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on June 30, 2010
at 04:32 PM

Thanks for the suggestions.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on June 30, 2010
at 04:32 PM

thanks! I have been asking my butcher for grass fed beef heart, but so far I couldn't try it. I will keep asking!

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10 Answers

2
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 01, 2010
at 12:21 AM

i know the thread is chicken but just wanted to mention that beef heart is usually one of the cheapest cuts at a butcher shop. but all you have to do is cube it up and braise it low and slow just like you would with anything labeled "stew meat". I usually just use veg stock and an onion and a bunc of garlic or something, dont matter. 350 degrees for maybe 3, 4 hours. done. tender tender, again, just like stew meat. Dont tell anyone and theyll never know theyre eating the heart. and you dont get much more motherearthanimallovermojo than heart, know what i mean?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on August 14, 2010
at 10:22 PM

Lisa, low and slow will do it. dice it up small and braise in a 250 oven for a good 5 or 6 six hours and itll be tender and not-too-heart-y.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on August 14, 2010
at 04:10 AM

Just got me some beef heart (and Liver)...I also love chicken hearts and livers. But, I have never cooked the beef heart and I have the entire heart...I cut it in half. My mom says some people cook them whole like a roast.

2
D13278772f6612432bf53413fad4e7af

(801)

on June 30, 2010
at 10:23 PM

Here's a chicken liver recipe from "The Barefoot Contessa":

Chopped Liver

Ina Garten

Prep Time: 10 min Cook Time: 15 min Level: Easy Serves: 5 cups

INGREDIENTS * 2 pounds chicken livers

  • 1 cup rendered chicken fat

  • 2 cups medium-diced yellow onion (2 onions) (or red onion)

  • 1/3 cup Cognac (or Madeira = sweeter) (or Armangac or Calvados = apple brandies)

  • 4 extra-large eggs, hard-cooked, peeled, and chunked

  • 1/4 cup minced fresh parsley leaves

  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves (or 1 tsp dry)

  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt

  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • Pinch cayenne pepper

METHOD

  1. Drain the livers and saute them in 2 batches in 2 tablespoons of the chicken fat over medium-high heat, turning once, for about 5 minutes, or until just barely pink inside. Don't overcook the livers or they will be dry. Transfer them to a large bowl.

  2. In the same pan, saute the onions in 3 tablespoons of the chicken fat over medium-high heat for about 10 minutes, or until browned. Add the Madeira and deglaze the pan, scraping the sides, for about 15 seconds. Pour into the bowl with the livers.

  3. Add the eggs, parsley, thyme, salt, black pepper, cayenne, and the remaining chicken fat to the bowl. Toss quickly to combine. Transfer half the mixture to the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade. Pulse 6 to 8 times, until coarsely chopped. Repeat with the remaining mixture. Season, to taste, and chill. Serve on crackers or matzo.

Some notes:

* Cognac (or its equivalent) sounds like a weird ingredient, but its "perfume" complements the liver flavor and makes it special.

* Be careful not to over-cook the livers or they'll toughen and dry out. You want them still pink inside. Cook over a pretty high flame for 2 or 3 minutes a side, then remove them from the pan.

* You have a choice of fats that act as the binder. Butter is fine (but be careful not to burn it when you brown the livers), but schmalz (rendered chicken fat) is the classic. Duck fat works fine, too. Bacon might overwhelm the other flavors, but feel free.

* The food processor makes this very smooth, almost velvety, which I like. If you prefer a coarser, "rustic" texture, you can use the meat-grinder attachment on a stand mixer. You can also add a handful of fresh chopped red onion to the food processor at the very end to provide some crunchy contrast.

* This actually improves after resting for a day in the fridge. It also freezes well, but try to bring it back to room temp before serving.

1
D738a5b2a67f3c36518a2ac9f32d27af

on July 01, 2010
at 03:27 AM

Low Carb writer Dana Carpender has a great easy chicken liver pate recipe with bacon and mushrooms in her 500 Low Carb Recipes book on page 80. It's available for free on Google Books. (But buy her books if you feel so-inclined--she's great and deserves the support and she's getting interested in real food/paleo just like Jimmy Moore is.)

When I cook a chicken, I saute the liver in garlic and butter to eat as an appitizer. Or to echo the pate recipe above, just saute in butter with bacon, garlic and mushrooms.

I second the chicken hearts on skewers idea. Try this James Beard recipe--I did it under the broiler and it was great! http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Grilled-Chicken-Hearts-101735

1
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on July 01, 2010
at 01:26 AM

hmmm... chicken hearts :)

they are delicious, I used to make a stew of them. It's good to clean them well, as often there is still blood caught inside. cut each half, squeeze out any remnant of blood, throw on a pan with whatever you like - onions, mushrooms, some veggies... I liked to make them with earthy spices, like allspice, bay leaves, garlic, maybe juniper... they are really good.

now I really want hearts and I can't find kosher hearts anywhere! booo!

there is hardly any offal that is NOT intended and good for human consumption. liver, kidneys, even intestines! it's only cultural attitude that's common in America that looks down upon offal.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 30, 2010
at 05:51 PM

i don't like the taste of chicken livers, but chicken hearts are good- i just can't look at them while i'm eating them or i feel like a cannibal. if you check them out at nutritiondata.com, you'll see they are extremely nutritious.

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on June 30, 2010
at 08:05 PM

I bought the hearts, because of the milder flavor of heart. Liver will be next.

1
D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423

(821)

on June 30, 2010
at 04:14 PM

Chicken livers are great!

Roast them on a perforated grill or with skewers till the blook drains out (BTW, for paleojews this is the only kosher method that works -- don't salt them raw!! actually, you don't need to salt them at all). They can be enjoyed just like that. Delicious! You can also buy them roasted and ready to eat.

Also, chop them up and eat them cold in a hard-boiled egg salad with chopped onions. Another traditional treat!

You can also roast hearts on skewers. Bon Apetit!

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on June 30, 2010
at 04:32 PM

Thanks for the suggestions.

1
9cfa1ab909f6f89544be665d4ef6e3ea

on June 30, 2010
at 03:34 PM

They are definitely human food. Whenever my mom roasted a whole chicken, she'd pull out the heart, liver and gizzards and drop them in boiling water, and we'd stand over the stove salivating until they were done, then pull them out, sprinkle a little salt and feast, blowing on our fingers the whole time to cool them off. Nowadays I sautee them in butter/ghee, but the rest of the procedure is still the same.

I recently used this marinade for beef heart (I used less orange juice than it called for) and I'm sure it would go nicely with other hearts:

http://www.starchefs.com/features/head_to_tail/html/beef_heart_c_cosentino.shtml

89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on June 30, 2010
at 04:32 PM

thanks! I have been asking my butcher for grass fed beef heart, but so far I couldn't try it. I will keep asking!

0
Afff7ca87a242fb1941fa7bb936e7f0b

on April 03, 2013
at 04:07 PM

Chicken hearts make an amazing bolognese sauce. Freeze some for about 20-30 minutes, just enough to firm them up, and then pulse 8-10 times in a food processor. (This is the alton brown technique for grinding your own meat.) THen brown in a saucepan with a bunch of "Italian sausage seasoning" (I found a recipe I liked on allrecipes) for a few minutes, and added tomato sauce (not the stuff from a can, a batch I'd already cooked) and simmered about a half hour. It tasted like a good bolognese sauce spiked with a particularly rich chicken broth. (I ate it over zuchini spirals.) :). A friend of mine nicknamed the recipe my "hearty tomato sauce." :)

0
04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

on August 14, 2010
at 04:12 AM

They are very delicious and inexpensive too. We also eat chicken gizzards; we just fry them up and add Franks Red Hot sauce...

0
616f9507dfd7c16887636ed2f8233ce1

on August 13, 2010
at 09:12 PM

My mom used to cook chicken hearts in a fry skillet. She would say they were done when the heart beat "one last time". Seriously, a chicken heart does look like it beats once when it is finally fully cooked.

Later, as an adult, I realized that the heart beat is the liquid in the chicken heart flashing to steam when it gets hot enough. But it is facinating to a child to be told that it is a heart beat. Try it with your kids and a skillet full of chicken hearts. Cooking is an adventure. Your kids will be amazed.

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