3

votes

Taking nightshade plants out, what is the consensus on blueberries and strawberries since they too have Solanine?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 26, 2010 at 10:11 PM

My pain all over has continued to improve on this diet. I also took out nightshade plants.

Now that I am finding relief, I want to make sure I am not eating any problem foods that may also be contributing to pain.

I just learned paprika is a nightshade as well which I had no idea. Also found out blueberries and strawberries also contain Solanine which is the same toxic substance in nightshade plants.

Is there a comprehensive list of nightshade plants and other toxic foods that are now linked to causing problems and pain that folks on Paleo diet can refer to?

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 04:00 PM

Well seriously what I am really looking forward to is the cookbook and expanding what is allowed for more variety. I think we would all like more of that. Robb allows a lot more than Cordain and I am not sure that is a good idea such as soysauce for example. So many are calling what they are doing Paleo but it really isn't by Cordain's definition. Robb is funny and got me hooked but for my needs of older folks with so many issues I am willing to be more strict to see how much I can resolve physically and mentally. Can you reverse side affects of eating wrong for 54 yrs? Give it my best shot.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 03:52 PM

I am so new at this and there is part of me that is a bit conflicted. I liken it to fixing computer. Do one thing and see if that works before you try another thing so you know the answer. Right now I am changing dramatically each week and I have eliminated so many things that I am wondering how I will know what is working until I try to add things at this point. But I totally agree it is worth removing them to see if any improvement. But I am still looking for list of the top typical troublemakers in order to know which ones to eliminate. Paprika wasn't one I was even aware of.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 03:44 PM

It is interesting that the Icelanders have been able to finish their genealogy and it is on data base but many fear what they will do with information but when doing genealogy you learn we may all be related to William the Conqueror at some point and they traveled all over and so did other early civilizations or conquerors. I do think that understanding what plants/food sources were prevalent in Europe way back and compare them to modern varieties makes total sense to figuring out what foods bother whom. So are modern blueberries and strawberries much removed from previous varieties?

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 03:30 PM

Since so little fruit in Northern climates I wonder if citric acid is big problem then? I know that in the past when I drank frozen juice with citric acid it would turn my stomach sour. I recall my Icelandic grandfather relating vegetables to rabbit food and he was meat and potatoes kind of guy and lasted well into his 80's.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 03:25 PM

Well this hits home for me since one set of grandparents are Icelandic and another grandparent is Swedish so I bet I have some Sami in me for sure. I recall many Icelandic recipes used all sorts of parts of the animal to make the meats which I thought was odd and gross and can't be found at any meat market. But yeah livapulsa, rulapulsa and big on smoked lamb, hungerkit. Swedish grandmother was big into preparing fish in various forms. My husband is big Norweigen type too and he loves meat and he is looking so much better with this diet and is not big fruit and veggie fan.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 27, 2010
at 06:31 AM

Do a 30 day test. Report :)

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 27, 2010
at 06:30 AM

Have they really ? And since Robb's book just got out I'm pretty sceptic about any improvements in Cordain's new book.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 27, 2010
at 05:31 AM

Strawberries? Oh darn! Could always trying cutting htem out for a bit and see if it helps any.

Ce7b9bcf264abeb5eb3944375e432477

(158)

on October 27, 2010
at 01:14 AM

"The northeastern part of Turkey is one of the main sources of Caucasian whortleberry (Vaccinium arctostaphylos), bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) and bog blueberry, bog whortleberry or bog bilberry (Vaccinium uliginosum). In this area grow little known wild blueberries with various names such as likapa, ligarba, kaskanaka, çela, morsvi, lifos, çalı çileği, ayı üzümü, çoban üzümü and so on"

Ce7b9bcf264abeb5eb3944375e432477

(158)

on October 27, 2010
at 01:14 AM

I admit to not having thoroughly researched this but wikipedia reports wild blueberries in Europe (Turkey) so it is in our metabolic milieu http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueberry#Europe

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:55 PM

Well I am skeptical as well that is why I am asking. But I have found it in various reliable sites which lends more credibility that there is something to this. I am not ready to give up on this and make the wrong assumption here.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:36 PM

I, too, will be buying both books. Things seem to have changed a bit since 2002, so I'm looking forward to an updated Paleodiet.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:16 PM

I see you too. Well I know Dr. Cordain came out with new research papers this summer which he is charging for and I haven't broken down to buy them on his night shade topic. I was figuring that maybe the new info will be in his two new books that come out in December I am planning on getting thru Amazon.com Pretty good deal for presales $23.54 for both.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:13 PM

Me too but I am really feeling so much better now that I can't look back. Plus you know I am eating very decadent on Paleo with avocados, coconut stuff, shrimp, fish, meat and the list goes on. The more I am not eating all the old stuff the less I have the desire to eat it. My brain is rewiring.

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:08 PM

Oh man I love artichokes with drawn butter!

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:00 PM

Afraid tomatoes are one, potatoes are another, all kinds of peppers including chilli peppers, egg plant. I love my tomatoes but not enough to put up with more pain. Yeah I was surprised when I accidentally came across this little bit of info on the blueberries and strawberries. Artichokes and okra also have the Solanine in them. So many spice mixes have peppers in them to add flavor in place of salt too.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on October 26, 2010
at 10:42 PM

Great question!! :)

  • Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

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4 Answers

1
Ce7b9bcf264abeb5eb3944375e432477

on October 27, 2010
at 01:11 AM

Copied from another source:

Plants and animals that could be naturally found by Northern / Western European populations during the winter months.

  • Fatty beef roast (analogue to Reindeer)
  • Pork / Pork belly (analogue to wild Boar)
  • Chicken or Duck (analogue to wild birds)
  • Kale (unknown origin, grows well in cold climates)
  • Chard (grows native in the Mid-Southern Europe and Asia)
  • Broccoli (grows native throughout Europe)
  • Fish
  • Shellfish
  • Eggs
  • Organ meat if I can find / afford it from organic sources
  • Blood sausage
  • Small amounts of frozen blueberries (common in Northern Europe)
  • Mushrooms
  • Fish oil
  • Nuts / seeds (link to article on historic consumption of nuts)

Here is some information on the Sami people. They live amongst the arctic circle in Northern Sweden, Norway, etc and eat almost exclusively animal protein / fat. I'm not of Sami ethnicity, but they are the closest thing to a subsistence culture still living in Northern Europe.

Some foods that I originally thought might have been eaten by indigenous, Northern European living peoples are:

  • Some form of potato - Most potatoes (sweet potato, etc) are tropically grown and originally from South America.
  • Parsnip - Originally from Eurasia, brought to Europe through early trade (?). Only can be grown in cold climates, so may still be appropriate if in limited quantities?
  • Carrot - The modern carrot is from Afghanistan, brought to Europe through trade. Wild carrots in Europe are only edible in the spring and in small amounts. Some small amount of carrot may be acceptable in the diet?
  • Beets - Traditionally available in Southern to Mid Europe along the Atlantic coast and in Asia. Not historically available to Northern Europe until the introduction of agriculture.I may reconcile the regional discrepancy by including some beet greens (chard).
  • Spinach- Grown in warm climates, native to Asia.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 03:25 PM

Well this hits home for me since one set of grandparents are Icelandic and another grandparent is Swedish so I bet I have some Sami in me for sure. I recall many Icelandic recipes used all sorts of parts of the animal to make the meats which I thought was odd and gross and can't be found at any meat market. But yeah livapulsa, rulapulsa and big on smoked lamb, hungerkit. Swedish grandmother was big into preparing fish in various forms. My husband is big Norweigen type too and he loves meat and he is looking so much better with this diet and is not big fruit and veggie fan.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 03:30 PM

Since so little fruit in Northern climates I wonder if citric acid is big problem then? I know that in the past when I drank frozen juice with citric acid it would turn my stomach sour. I recall my Icelandic grandfather relating vegetables to rabbit food and he was meat and potatoes kind of guy and lasted well into his 80's.

1
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:19 PM

I have seen the statement that non-nightshade plants like strasberries, blueberries, okra and artichokes contain Solanine being made around the web.

However I can find no evidence for this, just people repeating the fact without ever giving a source for the information.

Untill I see some actual evidence that these non-nightshade plants contain Solanine I will assume they do not.

Always be skeptical of what you read on the web.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:55 PM

Well I am skeptical as well that is why I am asking. But I have found it in various reliable sites which lends more credibility that there is something to this. I am not ready to give up on this and make the wrong assumption here.

Ce7b9bcf264abeb5eb3944375e432477

(158)

on October 27, 2010
at 01:14 AM

"The northeastern part of Turkey is one of the main sources of Caucasian whortleberry (Vaccinium arctostaphylos), bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) and bog blueberry, bog whortleberry or bog bilberry (Vaccinium uliginosum). In this area grow little known wild blueberries with various names such as likapa, ligarba, kaskanaka, çela, morsvi, lifos, çalı çileği, ayı üzümü, çoban üzümü and so on"

Ce7b9bcf264abeb5eb3944375e432477

(158)

on October 27, 2010
at 01:14 AM

I admit to not having thoroughly researched this but wikipedia reports wild blueberries in Europe (Turkey) so it is in our metabolic milieu http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueberry#Europe

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 03:44 PM

It is interesting that the Icelanders have been able to finish their genealogy and it is on data base but many fear what they will do with information but when doing genealogy you learn we may all be related to William the Conqueror at some point and they traveled all over and so did other early civilizations or conquerors. I do think that understanding what plants/food sources were prevalent in Europe way back and compare them to modern varieties makes total sense to figuring out what foods bother whom. So are modern blueberries and strawberries much removed from previous varieties?

1
6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on October 26, 2010
at 10:52 PM

I was wondering the same thing. The consensus seems to be that if you can tolerate them, fine. But if an elimination diet shows you that nightshades are a problem for you, get rid of them.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 27, 2010
at 06:30 AM

Have they really ? And since Robb's book just got out I'm pretty sceptic about any improvements in Cordain's new book.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:36 PM

I, too, will be buying both books. Things seem to have changed a bit since 2002, so I'm looking forward to an updated Paleodiet.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:16 PM

I see you too. Well I know Dr. Cordain came out with new research papers this summer which he is charging for and I haven't broken down to buy them on his night shade topic. I was figuring that maybe the new info will be in his two new books that come out in December I am planning on getting thru Amazon.com Pretty good deal for presales $23.54 for both.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 27, 2010
at 04:00 PM

Well seriously what I am really looking forward to is the cookbook and expanding what is allowed for more variety. I think we would all like more of that. Robb allows a lot more than Cordain and I am not sure that is a good idea such as soysauce for example. So many are calling what they are doing Paleo but it really isn't by Cordain's definition. Robb is funny and got me hooked but for my needs of older folks with so many issues I am willing to be more strict to see how much I can resolve physically and mentally. Can you reverse side affects of eating wrong for 54 yrs? Give it my best shot.

0
2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

on October 26, 2010
at 10:30 PM

No please don't take my strawberries and blueberries :-). I have decided to give up nightshades too. I tried eggplant last weekend and I don't really care for it anyway. What else is on that list? I love tomatoes as well, but I'm going to curtail the peppers.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:13 PM

Me too but I am really feeling so much better now that I can't look back. Plus you know I am eating very decadent on Paleo with avocados, coconut stuff, shrimp, fish, meat and the list goes on. The more I am not eating all the old stuff the less I have the desire to eat it. My brain is rewiring.

Ba63c7e94661dab9e244b751a87154c3

(45)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:00 PM

Afraid tomatoes are one, potatoes are another, all kinds of peppers including chilli peppers, egg plant. I love my tomatoes but not enough to put up with more pain. Yeah I was surprised when I accidentally came across this little bit of info on the blueberries and strawberries. Artichokes and okra also have the Solanine in them. So many spice mixes have peppers in them to add flavor in place of salt too.

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on October 26, 2010
at 11:08 PM

Oh man I love artichokes with drawn butter!

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