4

votes

fashionable paleo clothing

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 16, 2010 at 9:23 PM

Our healthy ancestors didn't dress the way that is fashionable in the West today. It is not that hard to wear a bathrobe at home, but I would risk being called "the Dude" in public. Any tips for public paleo clothing? I have found these expensive pants- some of which pass perfectly well as dress pants. They have remarkable mobility since they are designed for yoga. These shoes are stylish yet very minimal.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 15, 2012
at 05:24 AM

I like wearing bras as long as they are good bras. Underwires are from the devil and I can understand the urge to burn them. So I really think it's about comfort and finding your perfect compromise, or if you want go braless. Just not at work. I don't want to see nips ladies. That's unprofessional. My 4 cents.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on February 09, 2012
at 03:58 PM

I used to love my birks. Then I thought, a true hippie would go barefoot. I'm game.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 06, 2012
at 06:18 PM

Way late on this conversation, but I have to add that wearing a kilt will get you nothing but positive attention from my female friends.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 19, 2011
at 01:13 AM

Yes and as a resource thrift and vintage are usually limited in regards to the number of items available to the many many people needing clothing they like and that fits them. I'm for balance in this consumerism thing. I like what both unscrambled and waywrdsister are saying. Local and independent makers are also good sources for clothing if you don't find what you want used. If you need to consume something then supporting local makers, and local businesses is a good mix. For more Paleo hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/2235/fashionable-paleo-clothing#ixzz1H0HppCYm

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 19, 2011
at 01:11 AM

Yes and as a resource thrift and vintage are usually limited in regards to the number of items available to the many many people needing clothing they like and that fits them. I'm for balance in this consumerism thing. I like what both unscrambled and waywrdsister are saying. Local and independent makers are also good sources for clothing if you don't find what you want used. If you need to consume something then supporting local makers, and local businesses is a mix.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on October 29, 2010
at 09:59 PM

I know I'm a bit late to the party, but usually there will be advertising from local seamstresses and tailors at fabric shops. At our local JoAnn's the the ads are pinned up right at the cash register. If you don't see them, you can ask someone that works there about people who make custom clothing. My sister in law asked at a dry cleaner's (they often have someone who does repairs and alterations) and found a great seamstress.

C1fb8666b1ae085507a76a4c494e4f0a

on July 07, 2010
at 01:24 PM

If there were no 'stupid' consumers, there'd be nothing to buy in thrift stores. But yep, you can find some great stuff in thrift stores, 'vintage' stores, consignment stores, esp. if you can sew or are willing to fork out a little cash for alterations.

C1fb8666b1ae085507a76a4c494e4f0a

on July 07, 2010
at 01:20 PM

I hear you on losing the bras... I only wear one now for special occasions :) Course that's nothing to do with paleo, and everything to do with comfort (for me anyway)

Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

(4089)

on March 18, 2010
at 11:34 PM

@NickW: just wear it. I've never caught any flak for wearing mine in town...

587538a2db229b2ec884ea04cc3dc75e

(462)

on March 18, 2010
at 09:27 PM

"Suck it, agro-industrial complex!"

B1b9f0574aa9571f6aec6adb81d43190

(578)

on March 18, 2010
at 09:21 PM

If Vibrams get you noticed, what on earth will wearing a kilt do? Colour me curious, but I want to hear more. Despite the oddity, pants sort of suck. Unfortunately, my name's not Hamish, or another Scottish/Irish name.

Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

(4089)

on March 18, 2010
at 07:17 PM

I'd recommend buying at the manufacturer's website. They have more colours (including Mossy Oak) and models, including the Survival, which has enough pockets to carry a dozen bottles of beer at a time.

A1ae6a36ca0f4210882603e1255ea42d

(298)

on March 18, 2010
at 06:19 PM

Agreed, though I think there are certain instances where it carries over nicely (medicine, exercise); I don't feel the need to allow it to interfere elsewhere (especially when I am sitting behind a decidedly un-paleo computer)

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 18, 2010
at 06:08 PM

$150 to have pockets on your kilt! http://www.thinkgeek.com/tshirts-apparel/miscellaneous/9be6/

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on March 18, 2010
at 05:03 PM

I'm with you. Frankly this thread made me wonder if identifying my approach as "paleo" was something I really wanted to be doing. For me, it's an approach to food, not a religion...

Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

(4089)

on March 18, 2010
at 03:16 PM

I like the looks of the loincloth too, but really, might as well DIY your own :).

A1ae6a36ca0f4210882603e1255ea42d

(298)

on March 18, 2010
at 01:44 PM

haha, it's a joke dude...point is, while I gladly rock vibrams to the gym, I would rather dress like a gentleman than a caveman elsewhere

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 18, 2010
at 02:53 AM

I don't understand why that would be paleo

Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 17, 2010
at 07:25 PM

@Ed - yeah, I am going to make myself a pair this summer. There are infinite varieties on this theme: Mao pants - http://worldofgood.ebay.com/NATURAL-HEMP-Mao-Side-Tie-Hilltribe-Pants---Dark-Purple/190337556987/item Thai fisherman's pants - http://www.mediatinker.com/blog/archives/008262.html (make your own) and harem pants: http://www.5min.com/Video/Make-Your-Own-Super-Stylish-Harem-Pants-121030145 (make your own, sadly video stops b4 the end) to name but three....

Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 17, 2010
at 07:25 PM

@HR, best to ask around amongst friends or look in local paper etc. There are many people offering alteration services for existing clothes, quite possible they will make clothes for you too. It takes a little research, I'll admit. If this fails, try searching on the net for Fairtrade clothes. http://www.fashion-conscience.com/ this is a UK site, but has sections on recycled and sustainable clothes too....nice for ideas.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 17, 2010
at 05:02 PM

Louisa, I love the Hmong pants! Reminds me of MC Hammer--U can't touch this! And they're reasonably priced, too.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 17, 2010
at 04:53 PM

Where do you get hand-made clothes?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 17, 2010
at 02:29 AM

Well, the adult loin cloth would be perfect for sucking eggs in!

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 16, 2010
at 11:34 PM

Good point, but I don't think it's proven that Vivos have the same benefits as actually going barefoot. I admit I haven't researched the alternatives, but other shoes with a thin sole and wide toe-box may do just as well.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 16, 2010
at 11:21 PM

I was going to mention VFF, but just because people are staring at you doesn't mean it is fashionable! If we stop buying clothes (for fashion) we can apply that saved money towards fewer healthier (and possibly more expensive) clothes. $100 of food will only last so long. $100 might seem like a lot for a pair of shoes, but if you wear them every day instead of regular shoes, your feet will be healthier every day as long as the shoes last. In the long run you could save more than $100 on chiropractic care/body work. Your skepticism is probably more justified for other articles of clothing.

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9 Answers

4
Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

on March 18, 2010
at 03:02 PM

I can't believe that nobody has mentioned Utilikilts yet. I bought one last year and love it. Very comfortable, practical, and attractive. I wore it hiking and hunting quite a lot last fall; the cargo pockets will comfortably hold a ruffed grouse or a rabbit.

Blog post re hunting in a Utilikilt here: http://fearsclave.livejournal.com/871969.html

Manufacturer's site here: http://www.utilikilts.com/

Vibrams are of course the Paleoid's answer to the Hippy's Birkenstocks.

When I have to wear bifurcated legwear (i.e. trousers), I'm a huge fan of 5.11 tactical pants. Despite the manufacturer's law enforcement/military/Blackwater-wannabee marketing, the pants themselves have tons of pockets, are insanely practical, comfortable, sturdy, relatively inexpensive and come in some nice soft earth tones.

http://www.511tactical.com/browse/Home/Law-Enforcement/Pants/Tactical-Pants/511-Tactical-Pants-Mens-Cotton/D/30100/P/1:100:10000:10100:10101/I/74251

Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

(4089)

on March 18, 2010
at 11:34 PM

@NickW: just wear it. I've never caught any flak for wearing mine in town...

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 18, 2010
at 06:08 PM

$150 to have pockets on your kilt! http://www.thinkgeek.com/tshirts-apparel/miscellaneous/9be6/

Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

(4089)

on March 18, 2010
at 07:17 PM

I'd recommend buying at the manufacturer's website. They have more colours (including Mossy Oak) and models, including the Survival, which has enough pockets to carry a dozen bottles of beer at a time.

B1b9f0574aa9571f6aec6adb81d43190

(578)

on March 18, 2010
at 09:21 PM

If Vibrams get you noticed, what on earth will wearing a kilt do? Colour me curious, but I want to hear more. Despite the oddity, pants sort of suck. Unfortunately, my name's not Hamish, or another Scottish/Irish name.

587538a2db229b2ec884ea04cc3dc75e

(462)

on March 18, 2010
at 09:27 PM

"Suck it, agro-industrial complex!"

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on January 06, 2012
at 06:18 PM

Way late on this conversation, but I have to add that wearing a kilt will get you nothing but positive attention from my female friends.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on February 09, 2012
at 03:58 PM

I used to love my birks. Then I thought, a true hippie would go barefoot. I'm game.

4
Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 17, 2010
at 09:31 AM

You could go for the ultra alternative look, which would be SO comfortable, breathable, lightweight, inexpensive and not restrictive at all, but could you get away with it in the office? Well, it is all a matter of personal opinion, I would say go for it, nothing sexier than a man in a skirt, after all (and very inexpensive to buy/make) and it would probably take the focus away from the vibram's/bare feet.

But on a serious note, it is not just the fashion that should be considered paleo, why not go for alternatives to mass-produced clothes by buying natural, organic fabrics (how about bamboo or hemp, both very breathable and easy to clean?), well made clothes (even tailor-made) and trying to avoid third-world produced goods (which also means less airmiles).

What about buying fabric using natural instead of synthetic dyes? More expensive yes, but I would consider this the more 'paleo' option. Do you have a friend who sews/is a dressmaker? Keep it local. If you could ask him/her to make some clothes for you, you could specify exactly what you want, buy good quality natural fabric and save money too (also you will be more careful with them if they have been lovingly made by a friend). Handmade clothes last infinitely longer than mass-produced ones, so you will need less of them and they can be adapted just for you i.e. stronger fabric at the knees, more roomier cut etc. Lastly, they can be easily mended when ripped or worn out, which saves on more resources. I think it is definitely worth it in the long run, even though you may think the initial outlay is expensive (you may be pleasantly surprised at how inexpensive hand made clothes can be).

Think about hand washing and/or natural detergents too, which will make the garments last longer - and is better for the environment.

You could make a 'fashionable' paleo statement using mass-produced, synthetic, high performance fabrics made in China, yes, it is not difficult by any means and you certainly will be comfortable, but I think it is just as paleo to consider the 'hidden' elements of the clothes such as: labour, supporting local crafts people, air miles, natural alternatives and making clothes last.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 17, 2010
at 05:02 PM

Louisa, I love the Hmong pants! Reminds me of MC Hammer--U can't touch this! And they're reasonably priced, too.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 17, 2010
at 04:53 PM

Where do you get hand-made clothes?

Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 17, 2010
at 07:25 PM

@HR, best to ask around amongst friends or look in local paper etc. There are many people offering alteration services for existing clothes, quite possible they will make clothes for you too. It takes a little research, I'll admit. If this fails, try searching on the net for Fairtrade clothes. http://www.fashion-conscience.com/ this is a UK site, but has sections on recycled and sustainable clothes too....nice for ideas.

Medium avatar

(7073)

on March 17, 2010
at 07:25 PM

@Ed - yeah, I am going to make myself a pair this summer. There are infinite varieties on this theme: Mao pants - http://worldofgood.ebay.com/NATURAL-HEMP-Mao-Side-Tie-Hilltribe-Pants---Dark-Purple/190337556987/item Thai fisherman's pants - http://www.mediatinker.com/blog/archives/008262.html (make your own) and harem pants: http://www.5min.com/Video/Make-Your-Own-Super-Stylish-Harem-Pants-121030145 (make your own, sadly video stops b4 the end) to name but three....

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on October 29, 2010
at 09:59 PM

I know I'm a bit late to the party, but usually there will be advertising from local seamstresses and tailors at fabric shops. At our local JoAnn's the the ads are pinned up right at the cash register. If you don't see them, you can ask someone that works there about people who make custom clothing. My sister in law asked at a dry cleaner's (they often have someone who does repairs and alterations) and found a great seamstress.

3
D2f68674c2d09d1c63fa3d8628744a6b

on March 18, 2010
at 10:58 AM

Thrift stores. Not exactly ancestral, but certainly in the paleo ethos of not contributing to stupid consumption. Even organic cotton and bamboo are agricultural products (let's not even speak of tech fabrics), and are rarely grown in a way that is authentically sustainable and builds the soil.

Plus, as others have said: more money for good food.

C1fb8666b1ae085507a76a4c494e4f0a

on July 07, 2010
at 01:24 PM

If there were no 'stupid' consumers, there'd be nothing to buy in thrift stores. But yep, you can find some great stuff in thrift stores, 'vintage' stores, consignment stores, esp. if you can sew or are willing to fork out a little cash for alterations.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 19, 2011
at 01:13 AM

Yes and as a resource thrift and vintage are usually limited in regards to the number of items available to the many many people needing clothing they like and that fits them. I'm for balance in this consumerism thing. I like what both unscrambled and waywrdsister are saying. Local and independent makers are also good sources for clothing if you don't find what you want used. If you need to consume something then supporting local makers, and local businesses is a good mix. For more Paleo hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/2235/fashionable-paleo-clothing#ixzz1H0HppCYm

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 19, 2011
at 01:11 AM

Yes and as a resource thrift and vintage are usually limited in regards to the number of items available to the many many people needing clothing they like and that fits them. I'm for balance in this consumerism thing. I like what both unscrambled and waywrdsister are saying. Local and independent makers are also good sources for clothing if you don't find what you want used. If you need to consume something then supporting local makers, and local businesses is a mix.

3
A1ae6a36ca0f4210882603e1255ea42d

(298)

on March 18, 2010
at 01:44 PM

haha, it's a joke dude...point is, while I gladly rock vibrams to the gym, I would rather dress like a gentleman than a caveman elsewhere

A1ae6a36ca0f4210882603e1255ea42d

(298)

on March 18, 2010
at 06:19 PM

Agreed, though I think there are certain instances where it carries over nicely (medicine, exercise); I don't feel the need to allow it to interfere elsewhere (especially when I am sitting behind a decidedly un-paleo computer)

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 18, 2010
at 02:53 AM

I don't understand why that would be paleo

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on March 18, 2010
at 05:03 PM

I'm with you. Frankly this thread made me wonder if identifying my approach as "paleo" was something I really wanted to be doing. For me, it's an approach to food, not a religion...

3
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 16, 2010
at 11:41 PM

Here you go I LOL'd at that after the NYT article came out.

Otherwise, I think there are very good reasons to think evolutionarily about clothes. Your skin is evolved to breath and get sunlight. I personally avoid tight pants and since I am lucky enough to be a girl I wear skirts much of the time, which perhaps has been a contributer in lessening my problems with girly ailments. I also have traded a bra with an underwire for a more minimalist elastic bra. I really move and feel better without a heavy duty bra.

Women have borne the burnt of civilization's deforming clothes and shoes unfortunately, but skirts are one option we do have that men don't. Try looser pants or maybe even a kilt!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 17, 2010
at 02:29 AM

Well, the adult loin cloth would be perfect for sucking eggs in!

Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

(4089)

on March 18, 2010
at 03:16 PM

I like the looks of the loincloth too, but really, might as well DIY your own :).

C1fb8666b1ae085507a76a4c494e4f0a

on July 07, 2010
at 01:20 PM

I hear you on losing the bras... I only wear one now for special occasions :) Course that's nothing to do with paleo, and everything to do with comfort (for me anyway)

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 15, 2012
at 05:24 AM

I like wearing bras as long as they are good bras. Underwires are from the devil and I can understand the urge to burn them. So I really think it's about comfort and finding your perfect compromise, or if you want go braless. Just not at work. I don't want to see nips ladies. That's unprofessional. My 4 cents.

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 18, 2010
at 10:14 PM

paleo chic to me is anything that shows off my new hour glass shape.

2
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 16, 2010
at 11:03 PM

Your clothing has a lot less influence on your health than your food. If you have unlimited resources, then yes, $100 for comfortable slacks or $160 for minimalist shoes may be reasonable. My price points tend to be a bit lower. I look for the best combination of reasonable comfort, appearance, durability and price--which is not necessarily paleo. I did splurge on a pair of Vibrams, which I use for sprinting and water sports--I consider VFF's to be a sporting good, not really a wardrobe item. My tip for paleos on a budget is to minimize your clothing allowance, and save the money for the best food you can afford.

Eae21abfabb19c4617b2630386994fd9

on March 16, 2010
at 11:21 PM

I was going to mention VFF, but just because people are staring at you doesn't mean it is fashionable! If we stop buying clothes (for fashion) we can apply that saved money towards fewer healthier (and possibly more expensive) clothes. $100 of food will only last so long. $100 might seem like a lot for a pair of shoes, but if you wear them every day instead of regular shoes, your feet will be healthier every day as long as the shoes last. In the long run you could save more than $100 on chiropractic care/body work. Your skepticism is probably more justified for other articles of clothing.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on March 16, 2010
at 11:34 PM

Good point, but I don't think it's proven that Vivos have the same benefits as actually going barefoot. I admit I haven't researched the alternatives, but other shoes with a thin sole and wide toe-box may do just as well.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 18, 2010
at 01:49 AM

Well I think for true Paleo clothing you should only use materials you have caught yourself!

0
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on February 09, 2012
at 04:04 PM

I just would like to add that this sort of transition takes time. I would love to have things like Thai fisherman's pants or similar things, a few tunics, perhaps a kilt. But a philosophy of clothing can still show in clothes now, as well as go into future buying choices -- like clothing being looser and more sustainably made. I also think it is best to get the most out of the clothes you have. Give stuff to charity or a thrift store eventually, but make the change gradual.

A sudden wardrobe change strikes me as both impractical and a little vain, both of which seem out-of-step with paleo, imo. These are all good ideas, but I'm wary of putting money toward clothing when I have clothes.

Just my two cents.

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