2

votes

How much do you know of chemistry, biochemistry, and when, and how, did you learn?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 07, 2013 at 4:23 PM

For tl;dr, skip to 2nd paragraph :)

I am considering doing a degree in nutrition and dietetics, after having done a 3 year social sciences degree. I've been reading stuff in the 'paleo' etc online sphre for a year and would like to understand the chemistry etc a lot more than I currently do. I may be at risk of becoming a perpetual student (I would be 26 or 27 upon graduating, but a degree seems a way of generating understanding in a conducive (and social) context, and perhaps potential for me to work in related fields down the track. I did not do any science in the final two years of high school so it would be probably be challenging to say the least.(It could be a decision of madness too, who knows if I'd go into practice.) If udnerstanding is a main goal though, maybe I'd be better off in some way to work in realtion to current field and read in spare time... This is the course in question http://www.uow.edu.au/handbook/yr2012/ug/hbs/H12006102.html

I don't expect feeback on the above per se, although I would welcome it... Instead I'm interested in how you as a Paleohacks users have cultivated your understandings re chemistry, biochesmitry etc. Would you say you know a lot of about things? (reading posts of some users it seems that knowledge levels are high).At what stage in your life did you develop an interest in these things, pursue them? Was it a part of life from high school/broader life or a more recent interesT? Did you study at uni, or 'on teh side' in leisure time? And iin either cases, how do you think you've beneffited, whether professinoally of personally?

I would love to read any thoughts on these questions or any other issues that seem pertinent to you...

Cheers

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on September 27, 2013
at 08:12 PM

Mash, how are you using your PN cert? I know that the template is flexible into the paleo "mold", but that the gist of the cert is successful behavior modification which is definitely a needed 'tactic' in the paleosphere. Lots of folks would benefit from paleo-like changes if they could only begin to believe that it will help. So I'm curious how well you've feel that the PN cert is helping in your real life, whether that's as a trainer or as a shoulder to cry on for friends and relatives.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 08:12 AM

Yes I think I mainly have a thirst for knowledge(s) and the sort of degree listed above perhaps isn't really helpful for me. What do you mean re 'social sciences' being about brainwashing by the way? I think all education, socialisation to some extent is 'brainwashing' - we are in many ways in blank(isn) slates from birth, at least socially and to a large extent cognitively as well. Are you saying that social sciences are particularly 'brainwashing'/have particular effects? What of hard sciences etc...?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 08:07 AM

h processes in the hard sciences really involve and are about), it wouldn't seem the most pragmatic thing to do if I wanted to get an income (this is int context of me already having done four years udnergrad- money. isn't my primary goal- finding something I enjoy and being integrous is, but I've in many ways been unaware of opportunities and or taken them ...)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 08:04 AM

Thanks for your response. I've been looking into the state of play re dietitics etc and have come to totally agree with you - the politics of accreditation and lack of independence for 'practitioners' seems like it would be pretty demanding, in a negative way. Sounds great re working with Volek - I've read a little of what he has to say and it is interesting stuff to say the least, not least because the research seems very much worth doing. Interesting what you say re biology degree- I agree it would be great for understanding, outside of research though (and I'm pretty unaware of what researc

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:58 AM

Meant to say 'not the cardboard industry surely?. Though I imaagine lots of thinks become more interesting when one knows a bit (or a lot) about it.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:56 AM

Speaking of tools I found out about wet starch and water being used traditionally to post flyers on walls. The simplicity, elegance blew my mind for a little moment! thhq, if you don't mind my asking, where did understanding chemistry take you- not the cardboard industry (although I believe that is quite lucrative, if money is the main goal...)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:53 AM

In part that's where this question came in; I've been interested in understanding more of this sort of stuff (the few times I watched CSI I found it mundane lol, I don't think a lot in terms of glamour). I probably see it might be better to pursue things 'on the side' (although still I'm pretty unsure of things. Good on you for finding what you want and going for it. Honours years is seeming a huge ask for me, I give you major respect for doing a PHD...! (as I would regardless probably) :)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:45 AM

@Matt I'm not in love with the science per se, just testing the waters and trying to figure out what I can and want to do with myself. I am 21, in a BA honours year, and I wasn't exactly what I'd call particularly aware of myself or a lot of facets of and potentials of life and the world when I've made decisions in the past (or rather fallen into things- I probably wasn't the 'driver' so to speak (write), and am now learning lots all the time, trying to figure next phase in life... it wanting to understand things about health a lot more as have had issues and have realised an interest.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:40 AM

@Stephen have to that sort of stuff re Aristotle is pretty inspiring. Easier said then done of course but so very possible- accumulation of small choices, forming of 'virtuous' habits, learning above all to be true to oneself/to learn about oneself. It is probably a lifelong process, but I'm finding a need to pay more attention in present moments - only then can integrity to 'self' exist and any 'virtue'/excellence exist (and arguably the former in someways or maybe even all ways is constitutive of the latter...

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 10, 2013
at 12:30 PM

@VB Kruse backs himself into corners and he doesn't realize it. Then he says that he had to do that to bring the reader along with him. I cannot go head-to-head with his bio-chem, but the few times he's come into my domain he has inappropriately presented facts -- lost my buy in at that point.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 10, 2013
at 12:28 PM

I like Matt's definition. Too many elevator speeches become opportunities for buzz words which, ultimately, convey no meaning. Take a tough subject, explain it in 60 seconds.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 10, 2013
at 04:59 AM

@Thhq - LOL. Sounds like a fun place to work!

24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on May 10, 2013
at 12:33 AM

I understand your perspective. But as "brainwashing for slaves", I mean that literally and without exaggeration. The whole educational curriculum from K-12 and university has been doctored.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 09, 2013
at 09:01 PM

Elevator pitch...I asked for a concise summary of a meeting I didn't attend yesterday ad was told that there was a lot of "posturing". This to me would be the inverse of the elevator pitch...a mixture of ego, vanity and trivial content designed only to confuse people into comatose submission to a bad idea...

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:50 PM

Thanks for the explanation. I am really bad at elevator pitches.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:23 PM

More thorough and less generalizing than describing it in a single sentence, but more to the point and likely accessible than an hour long lecture.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:21 PM

An elevator pitch is a concise argument/explanation/proposal that can be accomplished in the time it takes to ride an elevator. A simplistic, but convincing explanation that the layperson can understand.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 09, 2013
at 05:18 PM

Learning to play the game is not brainwashing so much as mind expansion...look where it took a failed hipster now POTUS. A successful product of jacknut attitude, Ivy League credentializing, and down and dirty politics.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 09, 2013
at 04:13 PM

In a paleo sense: if you can measure it you can control it. Paleo brings in a set of control tools which have measurable benefits on my health. There's no need to overreach with theoretical/moralistic explanations when empiric practices work.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 09, 2013
at 04:06 PM

CD in the third quarter of physical chemistry the prof started lecturing on nonlinear regressions. It was 10 years later before I had a clue what he was talking about, but in hindsight it's way more important than what I learned about the oxidation rates of sodium sulfite solutions. Empiricism trumps theory most of the time.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 09, 2013
at 03:57 PM

Most of them are in way over their heads. Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 09, 2013
at 03:42 PM

I can actually understand Kruse, but he gets too theoretical for me.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 09, 2013
at 03:40 PM

Matt, I don't know what is an elevator pitch, sorry. Is it like talking down to someone or explaining it in simple terms?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 09, 2013
at 01:26 PM

I went down the applied physics/statistics/data science route. We required 3 semesters of chem (including organic chem), no bio. So still learning as I go. I can interpret the data, just not the meaning ;)

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 09, 2013
at 01:24 PM

*Some of them (Kruse) even go over their own heads...

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 09, 2013
at 01:53 AM

VB, I can agree with you that sometimes paleo "gurus" go over the heads of their audience with chemobabble and biobabble. Some of them (Lelonde) seem to do it on purpose even. There is something to be said for an elevator pitch to paleo.

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on May 08, 2013
at 09:48 PM

+1 for Rotovap.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 08, 2013
at 09:21 PM

Thanks for providing the links. Dr. Fink lost me on the third phosphate. :)

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 08, 2013
at 12:59 PM

I've been thinking about making a social health related site for a while now. Just yesterday I was looking for an open source StackExchange clone with chat abilities. Keep in touch man, websites are my specialty I guess you could say.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on May 08, 2013
at 08:00 AM

Wow, we ressemble each other a lot! I'm also into Computer Science (Software Engineer, usually C# developer) and a nutrition and conditioning freak! hehe. I'm even trying to develop an online utility plus social networking features around sports, health and sports.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 08, 2013
at 01:36 AM

Zzzzzzzzzzzzz...

F6ce9302d62d8b4a1ef2fc813c294770

(510)

on May 07, 2013
at 10:06 PM

oh...but as others mentioned, I should add that what I do as a researcher is not extremely glamorous. Mundane pipetting and extensive reading, for example, isn't glamorous. What IS glamorous though: understanding the complex, microscopic, biological process going on the test tube I'm working with. The tube doesn't look particularly interesting...but I know why it is.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 07, 2013
at 07:46 PM

Yeah but there's nothing like the romance of air sparging a titanium reactor full of concentrated sodium chlorate and sulfuric acid to get your juices flowing.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 07, 2013
at 07:17 PM

I tried to do Chem E, but couldn't get past the mind-melting boredom of it all. Too much plumbing and not enough chemistry. :)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 07, 2013
at 06:03 PM

Some things really are as glamorous as Brigitte Bardot up on my wall, but Paleo and chemistry ain't it.

Medium avatar

(2338)

on May 07, 2013
at 05:58 PM

i think you'll find if/when you take these courses the science side of paleo will make a lot more sense to you. that's not to say that youdo don't already have a solid understanding but when you learn the basics of said sciences you get a much deeper appreciation. at least that was my experience. i go to school for exercise science and have taken almost all my science courses.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 07, 2013
at 05:31 PM

+1 for being a Chemist.

  • Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

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11 Answers

9
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 07, 2013
at 05:24 PM

I think I've been a chemist since I was 8 years old with my chemistry set. Fooled myself into thinking I like biology in early high school, but chemistry simply clicked for me, and I haven't looked back. Currently on the cusp my PhD in chemistry. At 31 years of age myself, absolutely nothing wrong with going to school when you know what you want to do with your life, instead of "doing undergrad" as if it's expected (I did a chemistry bachelors, but wasn't sure I was going to enjoy it as a career.)

I though am weary of somebody falling in love with the science of paleo, it's certainly not as glamorous as it's made out to be. Just like the mass spectrometer doesn't solve every murder on CSI/Bones, reality is a bit more mundane.

Paleo itself is just an idea of a few, the rest of the world probably thinks we're a bit silly. Nutrition science is pretty awful as well, it attempts to reduce problems to single variables, when that's impossible and that's the antithesis paleo. Paleo is a holistic approach.

Just the ramblings of a chemist who's waiting for his rotovap to finish.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 07, 2013
at 05:31 PM

+1 for being a Chemist.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 07, 2013
at 06:03 PM

Some things really are as glamorous as Brigitte Bardot up on my wall, but Paleo and chemistry ain't it.

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on May 08, 2013
at 09:48 PM

+1 for Rotovap.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:53 AM

In part that's where this question came in; I've been interested in understanding more of this sort of stuff (the few times I watched CSI I found it mundane lol, I don't think a lot in terms of glamour). I probably see it might be better to pursue things 'on the side' (although still I'm pretty unsure of things. Good on you for finding what you want and going for it. Honours years is seeming a huge ask for me, I give you major respect for doing a PHD...! (as I would regardless probably) :)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:45 AM

@Matt I'm not in love with the science per se, just testing the waters and trying to figure out what I can and want to do with myself. I am 21, in a BA honours year, and I wasn't exactly what I'd call particularly aware of myself or a lot of facets of and potentials of life and the world when I've made decisions in the past (or rather fallen into things- I probably wasn't the 'driver' so to speak (write), and am now learning lots all the time, trying to figure next phase in life... it wanting to understand things about health a lot more as have had issues and have realised an interest.

5
F6ce9302d62d8b4a1ef2fc813c294770

(510)

on May 07, 2013
at 09:51 PM

If you are a very curious & open-minded person with a good memory, and you genuinely enjoy reading & learning broad subjects...then I say go to college.

I've wanted to be a doctor since I was a kid, so I went to college & got my BS in Biology & Chemistry. During that time, I began doing advanced scientific research/internships with several biochemistry professors. I learned how scientific research works and how to read difficult scientific studies. It helped that I studied hardcore in my first year of my biology/chemistry degree (4.0 gpa)...it really helped me set the foundation for furthur knowledge & understanding in the sciences.

I also took ecology/evolution & anthropology courses, and have a strong interest in healthy nutrition & fitness...those experiences combined with health issues slowly drove me towards the logical, paleo lifestyle. Now I am finishing my Masters in microbiology and I work as a research technologist for the Mayo Clinic. I conduct cool medical research experiments everyday. On the side, I am constantly reading scientific studies on paleo/natural therapies (they exist! There's lots of compelling scientific evidence for paleo). I spend much of my free time cooking...and LOTS of time reading paleo recipes/blogs. Eventually I would like to continue my education towards an MD/PhD, and become a paleo diet researcher like Dr. Loren Cordain (my hero).

I would definitely say that my liberal, well-rounded college experience has allowed me to better understand & appreciate evolutionarily-proper diet & lifestyle. I intend to keep learning the rest of my life...and I've already made it a part of my living/career too. It's hard work but I am proud and can't believe how much I've learned and grown throughout my education.

F6ce9302d62d8b4a1ef2fc813c294770

(510)

on May 07, 2013
at 10:06 PM

oh...but as others mentioned, I should add that what I do as a researcher is not extremely glamorous. Mundane pipetting and extensive reading, for example, isn't glamorous. What IS glamorous though: understanding the complex, microscopic, biological process going on the test tube I'm working with. The tube doesn't look particularly interesting...but I know why it is.

5
Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 07, 2013
at 05:59 PM

I went straight through to an MS in Chem E at Berkeley 36 years ago. The chemistry is one tool in the bag working around the chemimechanical processes used to make paper and hardboard from wood and recycled fiber. It's all over the map from organic to inorganic, but it's familiar country at this point, from cooked starches to wetting agents to inorganic bleaches.

There are other tools in the bag, which act like muses to prevent chemi-geekness. Music performance, reading, cooking, travel, etc. I live off of what I know of chemistry but it's not my life.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 07, 2013
at 07:17 PM

I tried to do Chem E, but couldn't get past the mind-melting boredom of it all. Too much plumbing and not enough chemistry. :)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 08, 2013
at 01:36 AM

Zzzzzzzzzzzzz...

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 07, 2013
at 07:46 PM

Yeah but there's nothing like the romance of air sparging a titanium reactor full of concentrated sodium chlorate and sulfuric acid to get your juices flowing.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:58 AM

Meant to say 'not the cardboard industry surely?. Though I imaagine lots of thinks become more interesting when one knows a bit (or a lot) about it.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:56 AM

Speaking of tools I found out about wet starch and water being used traditionally to post flyers on walls. The simplicity, elegance blew my mind for a little moment! thhq, if you don't mind my asking, where did understanding chemistry take you- not the cardboard industry (although I believe that is quite lucrative, if money is the main goal...)

5
63f2e1f026317464d8553801ea5fe495

(314)

on May 07, 2013
at 05:48 PM

I have 4 years of undergrad behind me that resulted in my BS in Chemistry. That includes about 30 credit hours of biology. I completed my degree in 2005, when I was 22. As I become more interested in the world of paleo, I'm finding my scientific knowledge to be incredibly useful in understanding the way in which what we eat affect our overall health and well-being.

4
Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on May 08, 2013
at 09:56 PM

I did a B.S. in Biochemistry at UCLA; did research and all that; but regarding how "legit" a study is, I'm less versed. I guess I'm slowly getting better just shadowing some well written blogs, and reading the occasional banter online. Not a fan of scientific papers though.

To understand all of this, I do feel there needs to be an understanding of the foundation in the pathways in our body. You don't need to know every step of metabolism and synthesis, but terms like Krebs cycle and gluconeogenesis shouldn't send you scrambling down a path of confusion. This, imo, can be self-taught.

4
68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on May 08, 2013
at 07:50 AM

BA and MSci in chemistry, minored in cell biology, pharmacology and evolutionary biology. It's the latter one that's given me the most insight to paleo. In chemistry I specialised in inorganic chemistry and didn't do much biochemistry.

If you want to do a science degree, do a real science degree. I really don't think that 3 years learning conventional nutritional BS plus a lot of $$ will help you much in the long run , I started science in school and continued it at uni. Now I work in the luxury goods industry, so there you go. It benefited me a lot having a difficult, numerate degree from a very good uni, as employers like that kind of thing. I switched to chemistry from biology in the 1st year for this reason (and I enjoyed it more). I loved my degree but didn't want to do a pHD or work in industry so left it behind after uni. Do miss it :(

4
2edfcc5c8044bbb4f22ba6ea4289f592

(1398)

on May 07, 2013
at 07:33 PM

Based on my experience with the Nutritional Science and Dietetics program at my University, don't waste your time and money. If you are interested in a piece of paper saying you know about nutrition, go for it. If you actually want to learn useful and relevant information, pursue a degree in biology, biochemistry, physiology/neurobiology, etc. The NUSC department here is stuck in 1990. I've attempted to speak with several professors, and each time I can't get over the "saturated fat causes high cholesterol which causes heart disease" hump. None of them had even heard of Gary Taubes or Good Calories Bad Calories. I've read GCBC and it's what convinced me not to waste my time with the program. I am a bio major, and interestingly enough, I will be doing research concerning Low Carb diets under Dr. Jeff Volek in the Kinesiology dept next year. Tl:DR: to learn, pursue a biology degree. To "learn" myths, pursue a Nutritional science degree.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 08:07 AM

h processes in the hard sciences really involve and are about), it wouldn't seem the most pragmatic thing to do if I wanted to get an income (this is int context of me already having done four years udnergrad- money. isn't my primary goal- finding something I enjoy and being integrous is, but I've in many ways been unaware of opportunities and or taken them ...)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 08:04 AM

Thanks for your response. I've been looking into the state of play re dietitics etc and have come to totally agree with you - the politics of accreditation and lack of independence for 'practitioners' seems like it would be pretty demanding, in a negative way. Sounds great re working with Volek - I've read a little of what he has to say and it is interesting stuff to say the least, not least because the research seems very much worth doing. Interesting what you say re biology degree- I agree it would be great for understanding, outside of research though (and I'm pretty unaware of what researc

4
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 07, 2013
at 05:14 PM

I took AP Chem and AP Bio in High school. I have a BS in Computer Science. I've learned a lot about the health side of biology, chemistry, physiology as a side hobby because I didn't have the vibrant health I wanted and knew that there must be a reason for it. Never had tons of money to go to the Doctor, never knowingly had any life threatening issues or anything though, and a lot of what I've learned has just been from logging in my internet hours reading blogs, patrolling Science Daily, PubMed, Science Direct and Google.

You can't have a successful happy life if you're miserable and sick all the time, as far as I'm concerned health is an absolute priority and learning about health stuff excites me like some people get excited about going to clubs/parties or doing drugs, like smoking weed (which might not be as addictive as it is just habbit forming).

I think it's Aristotle who said "We are what we repeatedly do, Excellence then is not an act but a habit". Discover what you want and if anyone says it doesn't exist or you can't find it then ignore them. I've had friends and family tell me I should have gone to medical school, and I'm sure studying this stuff in school would start you off with a great foundation. I don't think with the internet the way it is that going to school for this kind of stuff is a necessity, but if you want to do it for a career someday then it's a great start.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 08, 2013
at 12:59 PM

I've been thinking about making a social health related site for a while now. Just yesterday I was looking for an open source StackExchange clone with chat abilities. Keep in touch man, websites are my specialty I guess you could say.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on May 08, 2013
at 08:00 AM

Wow, we ressemble each other a lot! I'm also into Computer Science (Software Engineer, usually C# developer) and a nutrition and conditioning freak! hehe. I'm even trying to develop an online utility plus social networking features around sports, health and sports.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 07:40 AM

@Stephen have to that sort of stuff re Aristotle is pretty inspiring. Easier said then done of course but so very possible- accumulation of small choices, forming of 'virtuous' habits, learning above all to be true to oneself/to learn about oneself. It is probably a lifelong process, but I'm finding a need to pay more attention in present moments - only then can integrity to 'self' exist and any 'virtue'/excellence exist (and arguably the former in someways or maybe even all ways is constitutive of the latter...

3
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 08, 2013
at 09:14 PM

I know absolutely nothing about chemistry and biochemistry and proud of it.

Actually, I remember just one things: acids neutralize bases. That's all. Nothing more.

No, I don't have a burning desire to learn chemistry. When I read some posts (and some articles on Perfect Health Diet) my reaction is huh? What are they talking about? When the only words you can understand are articles "a" and "the" in the whole paragraph, it gets quite boring. I need things to be spelled out in simple form. Like grains are not good for you because antinutrients are there to protect grains from being eaten. That's what I understand.

Also, I would like to warn people about dangers of getting too much into details. Usually many brainy people with high testosterone-driven brain prone to zero in on one thing and one thing only. It used to help during the hunt - here is our gazelle, go get it.

However, you need to see the big picture behind the elephant. When you get too technical and search for "how" you overlook answers to the most important question - "why".

I respect people's interests in chemistry and biochemistry as long as they see the world as a whole, not as a compilation of chemistry and physics and understand that both disciplines are just a tiny drop in the bucket. We need to constantly remind ourselves that everything is interconnected. One of the main reasons I love anthropology because it can exhibit (and should) a more holistic approach to science.

"One cannot pluck a flower without disturbing a star."

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 09, 2013
at 03:40 PM

Matt, I don't know what is an elevator pitch, sorry. Is it like talking down to someone or explaining it in simple terms?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 10, 2013
at 04:59 AM

@Thhq - LOL. Sounds like a fun place to work!

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 10, 2013
at 12:30 PM

@VB Kruse backs himself into corners and he doesn't realize it. Then he says that he had to do that to bring the reader along with him. I cannot go head-to-head with his bio-chem, but the few times he's come into my domain he has inappropriately presented facts -- lost my buy in at that point.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 09, 2013
at 03:57 PM

Most of them are in way over their heads. Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 09, 2013
at 01:53 AM

VB, I can agree with you that sometimes paleo "gurus" go over the heads of their audience with chemobabble and biobabble. Some of them (Lelonde) seem to do it on purpose even. There is something to be said for an elevator pitch to paleo.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:50 PM

Thanks for the explanation. I am really bad at elevator pitches.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 09, 2013
at 09:01 PM

Elevator pitch...I asked for a concise summary of a meeting I didn't attend yesterday ad was told that there was a lot of "posturing". This to me would be the inverse of the elevator pitch...a mixture of ego, vanity and trivial content designed only to confuse people into comatose submission to a bad idea...

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 09, 2013
at 01:24 PM

*Some of them (Kruse) even go over their own heads...

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 09, 2013
at 03:42 PM

I can actually understand Kruse, but he gets too theoretical for me.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 10, 2013
at 12:28 PM

I like Matt's definition. Too many elevator speeches become opportunities for buzz words which, ultimately, convey no meaning. Take a tough subject, explain it in 60 seconds.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:23 PM

More thorough and less generalizing than describing it in a single sentence, but more to the point and likely accessible than an hour long lecture.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:21 PM

An elevator pitch is a concise argument/explanation/proposal that can be accomplished in the time it takes to ride an elevator. A simplistic, but convincing explanation that the layperson can understand.

3
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on May 08, 2013
at 08:41 AM

I am currently studying for the Precision Nutrition Certification which is excellent. I also found these below as supplementary lectures/material.

  • Professor Steven A. Fink: Cellular Respiration. http://bit.ly/ZDVcxr

    Both seven part series (2008), and newer two part series (2012). I do recommend watching the seven part series first.

    Steven A. Fink is Professor of Biological Sciences, Vice-Chairman of the Sciences Division, and Director of the Environmental Hazardous Materials Technology Program at West Los Angeles College. He is also Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology for the West Los Angeles College Dental Hygiene Program, and Adjunct Associate Professor for Anatomy & Physiology in the Life-Sciences Department at Santa Monica College. For the past 30 years his primary instructional responsibilities have been in the areas of Human Physiology, Clinical Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology. http://www.professorfink.com

  • The Saylor Foundation: Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology: http://bit.ly/11EkpJO

    Welcome to BIO101B, Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology. This course is intended for the student interested in understanding and appreciating common biological topics in the study of the smallest units within biology: molecules and cells.

I work as a GNU/Linux system administrator for a hosting company. I just passed highschool by 2% overall (36% final score!). That is all I have in terms of an educational background.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 08, 2013
at 09:21 PM

Thanks for providing the links. Dr. Fink lost me on the third phosphate. :)

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on September 27, 2013
at 08:12 PM

Mash, how are you using your PN cert? I know that the template is flexible into the paleo "mold", but that the gist of the cert is successful behavior modification which is definitely a needed 'tactic' in the paleosphere. Lots of folks would benefit from paleo-like changes if they could only begin to believe that it will help. So I'm curious how well you've feel that the PN cert is helping in your real life, whether that's as a trainer or as a shoulder to cry on for friends and relatives.

2
24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on May 07, 2013
at 07:51 PM

If the purpose is thirst for useful knowledge (rather than to meet a degree requirement for a specific position), I'd simply go to the university bookstore to look up the course textbook titles (if the information is unavailable online), buy at discount off Amazon (frankly, after having checked the torrent websites), and plow through the texts at my leisure.

This I see as far preferable to jump through hoops set up by others, pay thousands in tuition, and spend 3 years in program.

It's not that a university education could not add value, but that university social sciences is brainwashing for slaves. All of the first principles, unifying concepts have been scattered or deleted, and strategically placed behind the censorship of "political correctness". And if you fuck with that, the crypto-government organizations such as the ADL and SPLC (in Australia, they come under different names, but you guys have the same overlords so identical State censorship) will have you fired & permanently blacklisted the same day from any position higher than manual laborer.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 09, 2013
at 05:18 PM

Learning to play the game is not brainwashing so much as mind expansion...look where it took a failed hipster now POTUS. A successful product of jacknut attitude, Ivy League credentializing, and down and dirty politics.

24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on May 10, 2013
at 12:33 AM

I understand your perspective. But as "brainwashing for slaves", I mean that literally and without exaggeration. The whole educational curriculum from K-12 and university has been doctored.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on June 08, 2013
at 08:12 AM

Yes I think I mainly have a thirst for knowledge(s) and the sort of degree listed above perhaps isn't really helpful for me. What do you mean re 'social sciences' being about brainwashing by the way? I think all education, socialisation to some extent is 'brainwashing' - we are in many ways in blank(isn) slates from birth, at least socially and to a large extent cognitively as well. Are you saying that social sciences are particularly 'brainwashing'/have particular effects? What of hard sciences etc...?

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