3

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I have a question about legumes

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 02, 2012 at 10:53 PM

There is a blogger who said that one can soak lentils for 36 hours with kefir or vinegar and it would make the lentils paleo acceptable. What do you-all think? And what do you all think of legumes in general, philosophically and regarding your own experience?

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 06, 2012
at 11:04 AM

Yes, I soak lentils too. Apart from anything else, it cuts down on the cooking time significantly!

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on June 06, 2012
at 03:05 AM

There is no evolutionary based ideas in this post. Only nutrient density factoids.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on June 04, 2012
at 10:31 PM

Peas are more legumes than green veggies, right?

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on June 04, 2012
at 04:46 PM

Thank you all for your answers.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on June 03, 2012
at 12:58 PM

They upset my stomach and give me gas. I'll pass!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 03, 2012
at 12:14 PM

you soak the lentils, too? I was eating sprouted lentils for a bit but to be honest they taste like nothing. I think I'm going back to plain, "normal" unsoaked/unsprouted lentils (red ones). I have read that lentils are one of the few legumes/pulses that don't require soaking.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:11 AM

Only problem is they taste like shit

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:11 AM

I agree with Matt, they are pretty nutrient-dense. I thought they were high in phosphorus, but apparently their calcium-phosphorus-ratio is pretty good. Except if you're avoiding starch I think they're a good food.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 03, 2012
at 03:48 AM

(Cronometer equal masses black beans and 80% lean ground beef to see for yourself)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 03, 2012
at 03:47 AM

Second, beans are not that awful in nutrition. Certainly, they have their selling points - B1, folate, decent balanced mineral load (over say ground beef). Of course, ground beef has its advantages: iron, B12, zinc, selenium. Animal and plant foods complement each other surprisingly (or not so surprisingly) well.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 03, 2012
at 03:42 AM

I'm pretty sure that modern obesity trends do not correlate with legume consumption.

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6 Answers

5
2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on June 03, 2012
at 11:18 AM

I think it's pretty clear that the community does not regard legumes as "paleo". So if you are looking for paleo folks to give it a seal of approval I don't think that is gonna happen.

Here's the thing. Who cares? Paleo gives us a perspective. It's up to you how you want to look at it, and how you want to apply. If you can tolerate them, and properly prepare them you will be just fine. You just have to weigh out the costs and benefits.

Personally, I avoid them for the reasons stated above, and in terms of nutrition, I just rather get the protein from meat, and vitamins/minerals from the rest of my diet.

I think we have to realize that any "real" food can be eaten and tolerated by a segment of the population. From a small percentage to a good majority. If the paleo diet does not include them, you have reason why you want to avoid them, but at the same time you may do fine including them.

I guess I don't understand why people are asking if this or that food is paleo. It's similar to diary. Is diary paleo: no! Can you include diary as part of a healthy diet, sure!

2
1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on June 02, 2012
at 11:08 PM

Lentils contain lectins, which are not digestible by humans. There are some preparations (soaking is one of them) that can significantly reduce the quantity of lectins and other anti-nutrients.

Some people would call soaked lentils paleo, some would not. Some eat them regardless of anti-nutrient content, choosing to weight the nutritional benefits over the detrimental substances. Really, it's up to you whether or not it's "paleo."

1
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on June 03, 2012
at 03:31 AM

Lentils are a mediocre source of nutrition when compared directly with grass-fed meat or wild fish! It's a half-assed protein with an incomplete amino acid profile. Go into one of those nutritional tracking programs like Fit A Day or Cron-o-Meter to see how pathetic beans compare to beef, lamb, bison, salmon etc.

Yes I like them as an occasional cheat (preferably soaked and fermented) but they are no replacement for good sources of meat or fish.

Sure soaking them reduces some of the phytates but it doesn't change the blood sugar spike compared with animal protein. Considering that about 70% of America is overweight or obese and much of the rest of the world is following in it's footsteps I wouldn't recommend it.

Here's my view and feel free to downvote (hey maybe I can even earn that badge for it).

Soaked and fermented grains and legumes are like filtered cigarettes. Sure filtered cigarettes are better then unfiltered but isn't it better just to be tobacco-free! Tolerance doesn't mean optimization of nutrition. Just because somebody can tolerate some grains and legumes better then others doesn't make it Superman food!

BTW - I've been to several Weston Price Foundation events. I like their stance on raw dairy, animal fats, and most of their ideas. I firmly disagree with their view on fermented grains and legumes. They WAPF do not have the physique or health like those in the Ancestral/Paleo/Primal world. 90% of the WAPF look like the rest of America - fat and sick so if you want those results keep fermenting and soaking your grains and legumes. I saw an obese speaker as well - how much credibility do you have for your diet if you don't look better then the rest of America! WAPF tell people that they gain weight with age - yet hunter gatherer culture data show this is minimal. Yeah if you eat WAPF you will gain weight with age.

I've had this discussion with others in the Paleosphere and this is an universal WAPF observation that has been unchanged for at least 10 years. I also know celiac WAPF who are not healing - you know why - it's all those fermented grains/legumes!

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:11 AM

Only problem is they taste like shit

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:11 AM

I agree with Matt, they are pretty nutrient-dense. I thought they were high in phosphorus, but apparently their calcium-phosphorus-ratio is pretty good. Except if you're avoiding starch I think they're a good food.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 03, 2012
at 03:42 AM

I'm pretty sure that modern obesity trends do not correlate with legume consumption.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 03, 2012
at 03:47 AM

Second, beans are not that awful in nutrition. Certainly, they have their selling points - B1, folate, decent balanced mineral load (over say ground beef). Of course, ground beef has its advantages: iron, B12, zinc, selenium. Animal and plant foods complement each other surprisingly (or not so surprisingly) well.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 03, 2012
at 03:48 AM

(Cronometer equal masses black beans and 80% lean ground beef to see for yourself)

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on June 03, 2012
at 12:58 PM

They upset my stomach and give me gas. I'll pass!

1
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on June 02, 2012
at 11:13 PM

its best to soak them then sprout them, lentils are easier to digest than others, but sprouting them helps improve them and adds heaps more nutritional value to them.

0
E753cf7753e7be889ca68b1a4203483f

on June 04, 2012
at 09:05 PM

http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/putting-the-polish-on-those-humble-beans Beens are not really worth that much controversy, people like myself, who choose to consume traditionally prepared grains and legumes, tend to consume relatively small amounts of legumes. 4 ounces (112g) of raw legumes end up being a lot after soaking! They are quite satisfying to me and unless they are refried, I think they are pretty helpful in weight management. I do however not recommend legumes unless they are traditionally prepared, and if you are not willing to make the effort of proper preparing, I suggest tubers as an easier alternative for obtaining quality plant nutrition.

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 03, 2012
at 08:06 AM

I have re-introduced quite a number of legumes - lentils, red kidney beans, chickpeas, split peas - with no bad effects. I soak all of them, thoroughly, pouring the soaking water onto my compost heap or using it to water plants.

Here is nutrition data for 100 g lentils

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/legumes-and-legume-products/4439/2

and red kidney beans

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/legumes-and-legume-products/4300/2

note that the omega 3 / 6 ratio in red kidney beans is good!

And as the beans are well soaked, I'm sure that the nutritional profile will actually be substantially better than nutrition data says.

And here we have nutrition data for 100 grams of romaine (cos) lettuce (I know no one is going to eat so much - it is just to compare!) .

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2475/2

Apart from the huge vitamin K load in the lettuce, the beans do very well in comparison.

And when you look at the huge number of slim middle eastern and Asian people who eat lots of beans and are far from obese - I rate them as sound.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 03, 2012
at 12:14 PM

you soak the lentils, too? I was eating sprouted lentils for a bit but to be honest they taste like nothing. I think I'm going back to plain, "normal" unsoaked/unsprouted lentils (red ones). I have read that lentils are one of the few legumes/pulses that don't require soaking.

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on June 06, 2012
at 03:05 AM

There is no evolutionary based ideas in this post. Only nutrient density factoids.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 06, 2012
at 11:04 AM

Yes, I soak lentils too. Apart from anything else, it cuts down on the cooking time significantly!

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