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How likely is leaching of PVC?

Commented on November 13, 2013
Created November 09, 2013 at 7:48 PM

I know that leaching happens with certain kinds of plastic bottles, but I am wondering about vinyl sheeting. I would like to encase my armchair in vinyl in order to minimize dust mites and other beasties, but I don't know whether the vinyl is likely to be absorbed through skin (I like to sit topless a good amount :P). Does anyone have thoughts on through-skin absorption of plastics?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 13, 2013
at 10:52 PM

These were radioactively labeled and the background was zero. They are cleared very well (as they are in humans). If they don't stick around, they have no chance to disrupt natural signaling pathways.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 13, 2013
at 10:30 PM

I doubt that you'd need to worry about blackout curtains.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 13, 2013
at 04:08 PM

Ah, I see. I was thinking of buying a blackout curtain to hack my sleep, but now I see they are all made of polyester! I guess I'll have to come up with a different solution.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 12, 2013
at 05:26 PM

It's the stuffing, it's in carpeting, it's in your mattress, basically anything that would pose an acute danger to human life if it caught fire. Mesh chairs like the aeron, or wood wouldn't contain these.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 12, 2013
at 12:29 AM

I am quite cautious with regards to this single preliminary study on rats. What makes you think that a short half-life would make it unlikely that endocrine disruption occurs? I am a novice with regards to these chemicals.

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 12, 2013
at 12:27 AM

Great answer, thanks. Do you know what the materials in armchairs and beds are that release the bromide? Do you think that mesh-back armchairs like the aeron would be any better than the thick ones with cloth?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 11, 2013
at 02:06 PM

Study has not yet been published, saw a talk with preliminary data last week.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 11, 2013
at 01:38 PM

Wonderful news if true! Got a study for this somewhere whose sponsors are independent of plastic manufacturing companies?

Does this apply to the back-door BPS version used in so called BPA-free plastics?

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/manufacturers-replace-bpa-still-highly-toxic-bps

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 11, 2013
at 10:48 AM

I've been thinking about making one of these and the PVC. It's probably not enough to worry about.. but I'll probably wear gloves.

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2 Answers

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96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 11, 2013
at 12:13 PM

Great question, and especially relevant of modern PVC plumbing and drinking water, as well as the ones used for showers, as they'll carry warm water.

Now, the good news is that stiff plumbing segments are unlikely to contain phthalate plasticizers, but flexible pipes are more likely to have them.

A vinyl chair cover isn't going to be stiff at all, so it's going to have a ton of plasticizers to soften it up, so you'll likely expose yourself to a lot more endocrine disruptor. That said, your arm chair, if upholstered, is stuffed and built like a sofa, and including your sofa and bed, are likely all made with flame retardants, and thus another source of endocrine disruptor - this time filled with bromides, so likely to affect your thyroid. Covering them up in vinyl will possibly prevent some of the release of these substances, but will release the phthalates instead, or you might just expose yourself to both.

Perhaps covering your arm chair with a large towel, which you'd wash in hot water for a long time might be a better idea, and possibly looking into things like diatomaceous earth instead.

Modern life is wonderful, no?

5a36ff2b32fd2711d4bafba535f90df2

on November 12, 2013
at 12:27 AM

Great answer, thanks. Do you know what the materials in armchairs and beds are that release the bromide? Do you think that mesh-back armchairs like the aeron would be any better than the thick ones with cloth?

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 11, 2013
at 01:11 PM

We don't absorb plastisizers that well, so I would say such exposure is near zero.

In fact, I just attended a talk where an isotopically labeled BPA was injected into rats and it was completely cleared in 90 minutes. It did not concentrate in any part of the body except the intestinal tract (which is the primary way rats eliminate toxins), so it could be concluded that BPA has little potential for endocrine disruption. It appears a good fraction of the anti-plastic campaign may have been a sham.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 11, 2013
at 01:38 PM

Wonderful news if true! Got a study for this somewhere whose sponsors are independent of plastic manufacturing companies?

Does this apply to the back-door BPS version used in so called BPA-free plastics?

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/manufacturers-replace-bpa-still-highly-toxic-bps

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