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Dark chocolate and LDL

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 28, 2012 at 10:30 AM

Hi!

So I was wondering, "apparently" Dark chocolate reduces ldl, is this true? If so, how much would one have to eat for it to actually work?

1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

(1600)

on January 29, 2012
at 12:45 AM

The magnesium apparently helps the muscles to relax.

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:58 PM

I hadn't heard of chocolate for body pains--but I love the idea of another excuse to eat chocolate! How does that work?

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4 Answers

3
737471a5bc1c8b81d968c3f3fcd13b71

on January 28, 2012
at 05:44 PM

This is likely an indirect relationship, though not a completely unconnected correlation. Dark chocolate (as opposed to milk or white) does contain higher levels of antioxidants, which aid in reducing inflammation. When inflamed, parts of the body call upon cholesterol to help heal. So, after one provides antioxidants to reduce inflammation, that cholesterol isn't as needed and blood levels will be lower. The goal of reducing cholesterol levels, however, is off the mark; a better goal would be to reduce systemic inflammation, of which cholesterol levels are a decent sign. An anti-inflammatory diet would give the same results. I would also hypothesize that the law of diminishing returns applies here: I assume that you already follow an anti-inflammatory diet (some form of paleo), so the antioxidants in dark chocolate would have less of an effect for you than they would for someone eating SAD (I'm putting the study's subjects into this category. If they were from the Italian study, as Frugal Jen pointed out above, I would also assume they ate plenty of inflammatory grains). By all means though, go ahead and eat the chocolate--goodness knows I do. It's my far-less-than-sensible vice.

Remember: blood lipid levels aren't problems--they point to problems.

Also remember: I didn't go into crazy detail here, so please do more research before calling upon my explanation to figure out something else.

I hope I've helped!

3
76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

on January 28, 2012
at 01:04 PM

Apparently it's true. According to Medscape Medical News, a 2005 Italian study found that

Eating 100 g of dark chocolate for two weeks reduced blood pressure and LDL cholesterol levels, improved flow-mediated dilation, and ameliorated insulin resistance in this group of patients with hypertension....

The article states further down that the 100g was a daily intake. (100 g = 3.53 ounces)

2
09007983ed00d1a1663ac5eb71227e26

on January 28, 2012
at 12:36 PM

Hi for the best info on dark chocolate go to Marks Daily Apple there is a shed load of info.

0
1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

on January 28, 2012
at 01:27 PM

I make homemade chocolate with coconut oil and raw honey for body pains.Not surprised it would lower blood pressure,it's a healing compound.

76d70438d2442d21206b8e5528d23d23

(1098)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:58 PM

I hadn't heard of chocolate for body pains--but I love the idea of another excuse to eat chocolate! How does that work?

1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

(1600)

on January 29, 2012
at 12:45 AM

The magnesium apparently helps the muscles to relax.

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