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Trying to determine if my lard is hydrogenated or not....

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 17, 2012 at 9:16 PM

I'm new at using lard. The only lard I've seen here in Switzerland is shelf-stable, soft and creamy, and odorless/tasteless. I thought it was simply RBD but now I'm wondering if it's also hydrogenated. Wouldn't a hydrogenated lard be completely solid at 25C?

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Lard is not a saturated fat. Like all animal fats, it's a mixture of fatty acids, and it's mostly (59%) unsaturated. The composition is approximately 47% monounsaturated, 41% saturated, and 12% polyunsaturated. These numbers vary from one sample to another, but they are typical. Only one widely-available animal fat is mostly saturated, and that's beef suet. Even beef suet is only 60% saturated. Every other animal fat that is commonly eaten is mostly unsaturated. Lard is often liquid at room temperature if it has not been artificially hydrogenated.

Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

(7370)

on December 18, 2012
at 04:33 AM

I'm a trained baker. In baking, It's considered a saturated fat http://www.rebeccawood.com/food-as-medicine/saturated-fats-3/ Perhaps it's a states thing, to hydrogenate it, I'm in Canada, and what I used to bake with is not hydrogenated. Anyways, in our discussions about fats, lard was not discussed as being hydrogenated, although maybe some companies do. It also had a pretty high melt point, which is why it's great for pie crust, and butter, which melts low, isn't.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 18, 2012
at 03:25 AM

According to published data, all untreated lard is solid at 25 C. Manufacturers manipulate the texture and melting points of fats not only by hydrogenation, but also interesterification and chill fractionation. Natural lard tends to crystallize. Hydrogenation is a matter of degree. Manufacturers can hydrogenate varying percentages of the fatty acids in the lard. For these reasons, I render all my animal fats myself. It's extremely easy to do, and I know the results are pure. It takes about 20 minutes of my time (and two hours on the stove) to render five pounds of fat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 18, 2012
at 03:15 AM

Manufacturers manipulate the texture and melting points of fats in various ways. All natural lard is solid at 25 C. Hydrogenation is a matter of degree. Manufacturers can hydrogenate varying percentages of the fatty acids in the lard. Other common industrial treatments include intersterification, cold fractionation, addition of antioxidants, etc. Natural lard tends to crystalize. I render all my animal fats myself. It's extremely easy to do, and I know the results are pure. I recommend buying pig fat from a butcher and rendering it. It's really very easy.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 18, 2012
at 12:58 AM

Lard is not a saturated fat. Like all animal fats, it's a mixture of fatty acids, and it's mostly (59%) unsaturated. The composition is approximately 47% monounsaturated, 41% saturated, and 12% polyunsaturated. These numbers vary from one sample to another, but they are typical. Only one common animal fat is mostly saturated, and that's beef suet. Every other common animal fat is mostly unsaturated. Lard turns liquid at temperatures that occur in houses (warm room temperatures) if it has not been artificially hydrogenated. That's why manufacturers hydrogenate it.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 18, 2012
at 12:51 AM

Lard is not a saturated fat. Like all animal fats, it's a mixture of fatty acids, and it's mostly (59%) unsaturated. The composition is typically 47% monounsaturated, 41% saturated, and 12% polyunsaturated. These numbers vary somewhat from one pig to another. There's only one animal fat which is widely available in stores that is mostly saturated, and that's beef suet. Even beef suet is only 60% saturated. Every other animal fat that is commonly eaten is mostly unsaturated. Lard is often liquid at room temperature if it has not been artificially hydrogenated.

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3 Answers

2
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on December 17, 2012
at 11:51 PM

The box would say if it was hydrogenated. Lard usually isn't, as things are usually hydrogenated to make items solid at room temperature, and lard is a saturated fat, so it is naturally solid at room temperature. By solid, I don't mean necessarily hard, just not liquid.

Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

(7370)

on December 18, 2012
at 04:33 AM

I'm a trained baker. In baking, It's considered a saturated fat http://www.rebeccawood.com/food-as-medicine/saturated-fats-3/ Perhaps it's a states thing, to hydrogenate it, I'm in Canada, and what I used to bake with is not hydrogenated. Anyways, in our discussions about fats, lard was not discussed as being hydrogenated, although maybe some companies do. It also had a pretty high melt point, which is why it's great for pie crust, and butter, which melts low, isn't.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 18, 2012
at 12:51 AM

Lard is not a saturated fat. Like all animal fats, it's a mixture of fatty acids, and it's mostly (59%) unsaturated. The composition is typically 47% monounsaturated, 41% saturated, and 12% polyunsaturated. These numbers vary somewhat from one pig to another. There's only one animal fat which is widely available in stores that is mostly saturated, and that's beef suet. Even beef suet is only 60% saturated. Every other animal fat that is commonly eaten is mostly unsaturated. Lard is often liquid at room temperature if it has not been artificially hydrogenated.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 18, 2012
at 12:58 AM

Lard is not a saturated fat. Like all animal fats, it's a mixture of fatty acids, and it's mostly (59%) unsaturated. The composition is approximately 47% monounsaturated, 41% saturated, and 12% polyunsaturated. These numbers vary from one sample to another, but they are typical. Only one common animal fat is mostly saturated, and that's beef suet. Every other common animal fat is mostly unsaturated. Lard turns liquid at temperatures that occur in houses (warm room temperatures) if it has not been artificially hydrogenated. That's why manufacturers hydrogenate it.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Lard is not a saturated fat. Like all animal fats, it's a mixture of fatty acids, and it's mostly (59%) unsaturated. The composition is approximately 47% monounsaturated, 41% saturated, and 12% polyunsaturated. These numbers vary from one sample to another, but they are typical. Only one widely-available animal fat is mostly saturated, and that's beef suet. Even beef suet is only 60% saturated. Every other animal fat that is commonly eaten is mostly unsaturated. Lard is often liquid at room temperature if it has not been artificially hydrogenated.

1
Ddfc46d6cad7806af92187643179e2cc

(120)

on December 17, 2012
at 11:33 PM

I live in spain. The lard that you can buy here is similar to yours, but from "iberic" pigs (a breed of pigs raised for making the best proscciutto that have more fat than normal pigs). It seems too white for me, but in the ingredients list only says lard and conservatives (E-). It is very difficult here to find the fat to make lard in home. I still don??t know if these lard is hydrogenated or not, but I would like to know it because I like to use lard to cook. At room temperature it loose solidity and began to turn into liquid.

1
Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on December 17, 2012
at 11:01 PM

US lard is clearly labeled hydrogenated if it is, and it's solid at room temperature either way iirc.

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