1

votes

Lamb steak makes me feel weird.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 06, 2011 at 7:22 PM

Does lamb not "sit well" with anyone else? It's not making me vomit or anything, but I just feel sort of uneasy and kind of had to force myself to finish my lamb steak. I want to love lamb but :((( Any suggestions for making it more appetizing? Or is lamb just not for me?

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on August 14, 2013
at 08:25 AM

+1 so that's what that coating feeling is. no more ice water with lamb

Medium avatar

(2301)

on December 06, 2011
at 08:01 PM

It's not making me feel physically sick but I feel uneasy while I eat it. Like I have the potential to get sick. It's weird. I feel okay after eating it though. I think it might be more of a mental thing. I wish it was more appetizing.

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (2301)
  • Views
    12.1K
  • Last Activity
    1286D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

13 Answers

6
7d01d86c539003eed77cf901bf037412

(1076)

on December 07, 2011
at 08:00 AM

I'm a New Zealander and have been eating a ton of lamb since childhood. Here are a few random thoughts.

  1. Lamb fat solidifies at a lower temperature than beef fat. If you drink cold drinks with your meal as I understand Americans mostly do, it will coat the inside of your mouth in a way that many people find unpleasant.

  2. Some people dislike the funky note in the fat. This is MUCH more noticeable in fried or grilled lamb, less so when stewed or casseroled. It is also more pronounced in older animals, so look for tiny cuts from young animals if it bugs you.

  3. Good lamb is hard to overcook. It is inherently less tough than beef. Try it more well-done than you would have beef and see whether you like that.

  4. Try roasting or stewing with lots of traditional herbs like rosemary, thyme, oregano. These are good matches, full of interesting antioxidants, and will change the flavour. Alternatively, look up Indian curry recipes and make curry with cubes of shoulder.

  5. I personally like slow-roasting sinewy, fatty cuts like shoulder at a low temperature with some liquid in the pan, until the connective tissue has dissolved and the meat falls off the bone. I also like braising and stewing. Marinated chops grilled over charcoal, I like. Steaks are kinda boring: try other cuts and other cooking methods. I have had good success slow roasting in a kettle grill -- lamb and smoke is good.

  6. You want fatty meat? Cheap meat? Try belly aka flap. This is what I do with it when I have time: http://vital.org.nz/barbeque-lamb.html

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on August 14, 2013
at 08:25 AM

+1 so that's what that coating feeling is. no more ice water with lamb

2
Medium avatar

on December 06, 2011
at 09:46 PM

I tried grass-fed ground lamb for the first time recently. Seemed "oily" compared with ground beef and ground buffalo. "Oily" not in a fat-phobic sense, mind you. More like duck is an oiler bird compared say with chicken. I'm fine with a lamb chop but didn't much care for the ground version.

1
Medium avatar

on December 07, 2011
at 04:13 AM

If you like feeling weird, keep eating it. ("Like" meaning: want to continue feeling the way you feel when you eat lamb.) If you don't like feeling weird (from eating lamb), then stop.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 07, 2011
at 04:00 AM

Lamb and mutton (more likely mutton) can have strongly flavored fat, strongly flavored as in funky. Heck, I think lamb tastes like sheep smell, and sheep are the worst smelling livestock aside from horses IMO.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 07, 2011
at 03:14 AM

The first time I ate lamb, which wasn't very long ago, my stomach felt a little funny and I think it was the different fat composition. Ever since then, I've been lucky because it smells and tastes great and I have no symptoms afterward.

If I were you, I wouldn't force myself to eat it but I wouldn't hesitate to try again after a few more months on this lifestyle. The longer you avoid refined foods and sweeteners, you're likely to get more comfortable with new real foods.

1
7cbdd4e8eedba06368d4766e6c0ef015

(320)

on December 06, 2011
at 07:30 PM

Lamb might not be for you. I have a friend who loves the taste of it but says she gets hot flashes when she eats it. But she eats goat meat instead and enjoys the similar (but milder) flavor without the hot flashes.

It can be an acquired taste. I grew up on it (my peeps are Greek) so I never considered not eating it. And I get very excited over a really well-cooked piece of lamb!

0
C081372eb93b10e8c8512edf76890588

on November 10, 2013
at 11:41 PM

Have you tried making lamb a different way or a different cut? It's a strong taste, either way, but some parts have less fat. I actually hate the lamb steak, love beef steak, and I bought lamb breast today because it was on sale and it was delicious. If you get the opportunity and it's available and cheap, get the breast and fry it in a little oil until all the sides are brown - meaning don't leave it, turn it regularly. I didn't use coconut oil, but a combination of grass-fed butter and olive oil and then simmered it in some water from the fennel I boiled to go along with it for about an hour. Fennel doesn't exactly compliment it, but it has a very unique flavor and the lemon taste softened the barnyard taste of the tender lamb.

0
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 02, 2012
at 08:12 PM

I used to hate it when I would get it at Trader Joe's because it had been shipped a long ways and had time to develop that special lamb funk.

Now that I have a source where it is very fresh, 100% pastured, and a very mild tasting breed, it is the one thing that has never upset my stomach.

Source, breed, age of culling, feed, and time before cooking can all change the way lamb tastes.

Sounds like a bummer, I can't handle it when it has developed that particular eu de sheepie, but if it didn't have that, it might just not be for you. Check out goat, it is leaner and less prone to funkiness.

0
1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

on September 02, 2012
at 04:27 PM

Lamb is very fatty - losing some of the fat during cooking might help. e.g. if you make a stew or similar, drain some of the fat off to use later, don't try to eat it all. If you're doing a steak, try grilling it so that some of the fat can drip off.

0
D8c04730b5d016a839b3c5b932bf59dd

on December 07, 2011
at 06:14 AM

I've never been crazy about it. Fortunately, my parents rarely served, and I take few opportunities now to eat it. But I do keep trying. I've had some REALLY good stuff, but it's usually smothered in something. The last bite I had was a lamb curry at a thai restaurant in Fort Bragg, CA. My friends love Morrocan, so we have it there sometimes and it's dripping in something that makes it wonderful. (hack day, not strictly paleo) They're also fond of middle eastern food, and I've had yummy lamb stuff there too.

0
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on December 06, 2011
at 08:25 PM

Yes, I have trouble with lamb. It's interesting, because I haven't been able to eat it because my companion is allergic... just a bite, even mixed in with other meats, and she's in the bathroom 'tanking'.... so I'd always had this idea that, when I had the chance, I was going to ENJOY some lamb... well, the first time I got some beautiful, pasture-raised lamb this past spring (a 'frenched' rack of lamb chops, and some ground lamb shoulder), I made some favorite "lamb" dishes... cherry-glazed rack of lamb, and moussaka. After eating them, (on two separate occasions), I got dizzy, disoriented, and nauseated. I later made the same glazed rack with pork, and moussaka with pasture-raised ground beef, for a couple of events (since they're beautiful and much cherished recipes) and didn't have a single problem... I've decided that my body isn't any happier with lamb than my companion's... so I don't eat it any more.

0
7842808cd699f35741248f8e55c776bd

(218)

on December 06, 2011
at 07:54 PM

I used to buy lamb from the Giant grocery up the street when I first started paleo, but then after I bought a half-lamb direct from a farm, walking past the pre-packaged stuff in the store definitely makes me a little queasy. You can usually count on lamb to be grass-fed, but who knows what's going on with that regular grocery store stuff... Where are you getting your lamb?

I also have a friend who wouldn't eat lamb because it gave her "a funny after-taste" that persisted for some time following a meal. But I convinced her to try some of my lamb from the local farm, now she's hooked.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 06, 2011
at 07:52 PM

I have the exact opposite thing. Hate the smell, I have to cover it up with A1 and melt some ghee over it, but I get an awesomely nice calm/happy feeling after eating it. So I'm getting over the smell. Actually have some in my lunch today.

Eating it cold helps get rid of the smell too, but that's not your issue.

Do you get that same kind of feeling with other dense meats? Is it a sit in your stomach like a rock, and can't digest it kind of thing? If so, you need more acid in your stomach. You could try taking a betaine-hcl capsule right before eating meat and see if that makes it better. If it does, that's exactly the issue.

Medium avatar

(2301)

on December 06, 2011
at 08:01 PM

It's not making me feel physically sick but I feel uneasy while I eat it. Like I have the potential to get sick. It's weird. I feel okay after eating it though. I think it might be more of a mental thing. I wish it was more appetizing.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!