3

votes

Best cuts of lamb?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 03, 2013 at 9:13 PM

Hi!

I finally found a local (kinda) farm raising/sourcing pastured ruminants (raising lamb and sourcing beef from a far away land).

What are some of the best (plenty of fat) cuts? If you're into the gelatin, tendon, marrow, etc... what are some good cuts for that stuff? Preferably these aren't the most costly, but throw it all out there either way.

If you want, say a little something about how you cook your favorite cuts.

Thanks for your time!

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 05, 2013
at 06:38 PM

That sounds like a delectable preparation. I'll have to keep this post in mind when the ribs come tumbling in!

C4deaa6bb01626b4569e8992890381ab

(930)

on September 04, 2013
at 10:17 PM

I'd go for ruminant bones personally but you can use pork bones just as you would with lamb & beef. I know what you mean about the chicken breast thing, does seem a little strange but lamb breast is extremely fatty. I think Lambs are just fatty be default.

Ac04066a888a3f0b66f9a2935a6117c3

(315)

on September 04, 2013
at 09:07 PM

Oh and for reference - it is a 35 pound lamb

Ac04066a888a3f0b66f9a2935a6117c3

(315)

on September 04, 2013
at 09:00 PM

I think it depends where you are located, I just purchased a whole lamb for $245. I am located in the Midwest and when I was researching prices varied from 245 to 300.

Cb893ff469fdc4aa38e031dcf9d5a8a5

(55)

on September 04, 2013
at 07:31 PM

Leg of lamb and lamb shanks coarsely chopped are high in bone-marrow, fat and connective tendons. These go best in stew, curries or biryani. I don't do much baking or grilling not sure about other cuts.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 04, 2013
at 07:09 PM

I think that is decent, depends on the size of the lamb. I tried to get one straight from a small scale farm that was supposed to be just under $300, but that deal never came to fruition, so I don't know if that is a realistic price. I've paid $375 for the one I did get.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 04, 2013
at 03:50 PM

Also, a bit surprised to hear "breast" since, coming from a chicken-loving past, I always knew breast to be the leanest of the chicken.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 04, 2013
at 03:47 PM

My freezer is not very big and it's full ATM but I'm seriously considering it in the future. Is $450 a good price for a pastured lamb?

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 04, 2013
at 03:44 PM

I haven't. Been intending to... need to get some good broth bones. We had Lechon (a whole pig) at a family party recently and I have some of its bones in the freezer. Though I don't think it was a very healthy pig, and I don't know if pig is the best source for broth...

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5 Answers

best answer

3
C4deaa6bb01626b4569e8992890381ab

on September 03, 2013
at 11:22 PM

Lamb breast, it's cheaper than other cuts & fatty as hell! plus it's very very tasty. I get my farmer to cut it into strips & i throw a few spices on (it's tasty on its own too) & give it a 20 minute blast in the oven. As for gleatin/tendon....have you tried bone broth?? if you haven't then please do. =o)

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 04, 2013
at 03:44 PM

I haven't. Been intending to... need to get some good broth bones. We had Lechon (a whole pig) at a family party recently and I have some of its bones in the freezer. Though I don't think it was a very healthy pig, and I don't know if pig is the best source for broth...

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 04, 2013
at 03:50 PM

Also, a bit surprised to hear "breast" since, coming from a chicken-loving past, I always knew breast to be the leanest of the chicken.

C4deaa6bb01626b4569e8992890381ab

(930)

on September 04, 2013
at 10:17 PM

I'd go for ruminant bones personally but you can use pork bones just as you would with lamb & beef. I know what you mean about the chicken breast thing, does seem a little strange but lamb breast is extremely fatty. I think Lambs are just fatty be default.

1
Ac04066a888a3f0b66f9a2935a6117c3

(315)

on September 04, 2013
at 09:06 PM

I personally love lamb ribs!

I bake them in the oven after rubbing with salt and pepper. Cook until the fat melts off a bit and the skin crisps up nicely. For a dipping sauce, I saut?? a few onions in butter then add red wine and some raspberries(or any fruit). Cook on low for an hour or so until it reduces and thickens a bit. Pour/brush this over the ribs after you remove them from the oven and enjoy!

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 05, 2013
at 06:38 PM

That sounds like a delectable preparation. I'll have to keep this post in mind when the ribs come tumbling in!

1
34a31e6e59ee73ac7ddfd96c3e653919

on September 04, 2013
at 11:11 AM

lamb shanks are great. Come on a bone with some marrow inside and a lot of gelatin and connective tissue holding the meat on. Braise it for a few hours and it should turn out delicious.

1
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 04, 2013
at 10:06 AM

I just ordered a whole lamb (you'll get the best deal if you do that) and it is all good. They are surprisingly compact and can fit in a normal freezer.

I ordered the shoulder and neck ground.

The rest of the meat turned into a bunch of chops (that I just pan fry) except for one rack that I'm saving for a special occasion.

Breast, shanks, bones, and organ meats are great. (These you should be able to get for almost nothing.)

It is all lovely and fatty in just the right way. Even the heart, which is a super lean meat cooked up brilliantly both as kabobs cooked under the broiler and just sliced and pan fried in butter. It was so delicate that I wish I would have tried out the carpaccio dish I chickened out on making.

Medium avatar

(624)

on September 04, 2013
at 03:47 PM

My freezer is not very big and it's full ATM but I'm seriously considering it in the future. Is $450 a good price for a pastured lamb?

Ac04066a888a3f0b66f9a2935a6117c3

(315)

on September 04, 2013
at 09:07 PM

Oh and for reference - it is a 35 pound lamb

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 04, 2013
at 07:09 PM

I think that is decent, depends on the size of the lamb. I tried to get one straight from a small scale farm that was supposed to be just under $300, but that deal never came to fruition, so I don't know if that is a realistic price. I've paid $375 for the one I did get.

Ac04066a888a3f0b66f9a2935a6117c3

(315)

on September 04, 2013
at 09:00 PM

I think it depends where you are located, I just purchased a whole lamb for $245. I am located in the Midwest and when I was researching prices varied from 245 to 300.

0
F00050d678de2dc749a86b4d3f2ffc0c

on September 03, 2013
at 09:29 PM

You should be able to tell by looking or ask the butcher, but lamb usually comes with a bunch of variations of fat and fell layered. I personally like shoulder cuts and rib chops, but with lamb the fattiest would probably be sirloin chops.

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