1

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Why did they change the reference range for C-reactive protein?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 21, 2011 at 9:31 PM

Got my labs back today. Last blood work I had done showed high C-reactive protein (in the 7.8 range). This recent test shows about the same level (7.5 ish) but I'm now within the reference range for "normal." Normal used to be 0-3.0; now it's 0-9.9.

Anyone notice this and or know why this might have occurred?

Should I be worried?

What can/should I do?

Note that I eat a pretty much zero carb diet. Most other numbers were good, with monocytes being slightly elevated (I had a sinus infection at the time of the blood draw), and iron and sodium were very slightly low (just outside the reference).

Your help is very much appreciated!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on July 22, 2011
at 01:36 PM

just use the ratio to convert. Its the same for clinical management.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on July 22, 2011
at 03:46 AM

Thanks for that.

B76f22ed4373946b3c8990b667562683

(783)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:20 PM

I thought I should mention the study I referred to: Rifai N, Ridker PM. Population distributions of C-reactive protein in apparently healthy men and women in the United States: implication for clinical interpretation. Clin Chem 2003; 49:666-9

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1 Answers

7
B76f22ed4373946b3c8990b667562683

on July 21, 2011
at 10:00 PM

The reference ranges are standards at whatever particular lab your work goes out to. Lab A could have an entirely different set of reference ranges than Lab B, although they should more or less correlate, considering what the values mean! The range of 0-3.0 is what the AHA recommends as of about 2003.

A study from around the same time suggested that hs-CRP could be as high as 8.6 in healthy men and 9.1 in healthy women. Your lab may have switched their range to correspond with these values. It is up to your doctor to determine if this level, in conjuncture with your other results, is of any significance. Since CRP is a non-specific marker of systemic inflammation, an infection could elevate this number. But again, your doc is the one to tell you what this level means for you.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on July 22, 2011
at 03:46 AM

Thanks for that.

B76f22ed4373946b3c8990b667562683

(783)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:20 PM

I thought I should mention the study I referred to: Rifai N, Ridker PM. Population distributions of C-reactive protein in apparently healthy men and women in the United States: implication for clinical interpretation. Clin Chem 2003; 49:666-9

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