4

votes

knives! for cutting meats, and other things....

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 15, 2011 at 10:42 PM

hey, so i want to invest in some really awesome knives soon. i pretty much need everything as everything i have now is kind of random, but, i make it happen. suggestions please!

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on June 22, 2012
at 05:43 AM

Aye wusthof have been in my family for many years.

E3d9d9309af8338c807257a915eaa44a

(10)

on September 01, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Thanks for the tip (went high end on the mignon 1-2oz. goes a long ways) yummy in my tummy. Thanks also for the meat cleaver. Putting a big swing on a hammer to the back chops through frozen meat nicely. Now if I can just find the 5lb mini-sledge hammer and really big meat cleaver...

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on August 16, 2011
at 02:31 PM

Another vote for Shun knives. We now have three, and they make kitchen work so much more enjoyable. We originally leaned towards German-made knives, but quickly fell in love with the Shun Ken Onion chef's knife once we handled it.

E6c676dcd53d2fceffb4533ac47cefd5

on August 16, 2011
at 02:01 PM

good call! as much as i would love those totally rad $600 knives, i would like something on the more affordable end for now, def don't want to spend $200 on a knife, but, might be willing to spend $100 or so on one. i will be building the set piece by piece anyway. and, whetstones, the way to go for sharpening? or, should i leave it to the pros? thanks guys!

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on August 16, 2011
at 10:01 AM

Globals are ok, they have done their marketing well. But there are better deals if you are willing to learn about japanese knives. Like the CarboNext series.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on August 16, 2011
at 05:54 AM

I second to Victorinox 8 inch chefs knife. Its a good choice for the money. It isnt as thin of light as some good japanese gyutos. But the price is much less. What i dont understand why many buy santokus, gyuto would be much more suitable for western cooking (its basicly your standard french chefs knife). I guess its mostly a trend.... ;)

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 16, 2011
at 05:50 AM

I eat raw filet mignon, unbrined, all the time. If you trust your source, you've got nothing to worry about.

F77c6462cf6596fe6dabeeb5931821ab

(365)

on August 16, 2011
at 05:26 AM

help us out by letting everyone know what kinda budget you're working with =]

1bd4ea62097aa99c8cbef8aa5d02db77

(448)

on August 15, 2011
at 11:41 PM

I used to sell Cutco knives. Their sales tactics are stupid, but the knives themselves are amazing. They are what I still use, almost 10 years later.

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13 Answers

3
6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on August 15, 2011
at 11:28 PM

My Parents have Cutco Knives and love them. They have a lifetime guarantee.

1bd4ea62097aa99c8cbef8aa5d02db77

(448)

on August 15, 2011
at 11:41 PM

I used to sell Cutco knives. Their sales tactics are stupid, but the knives themselves are amazing. They are what I still use, almost 10 years later.

2
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on August 16, 2011
at 05:45 AM

I have Aritsugu a type guyto. And two japanese wheatsones to keep it sharp (bester 1200 and arayashima 6000 grit). It is an amazing steel to hold an edge, no german knife comes close. But it is quite hard to sharpen do to its peculiar carbon steel blade.

Shun and Globals are ok, but there are better bang for the buck if you want to try the awsome j knives. I recommend

If you buy a japanese knife, you must learn how to sharpen them with wheatsones, its the only way to keep them razor sharp everyday. Otherwise they are not worth it. Or any knife, it has to be sharp, and i have noticed that many pro chefs have quite unsharp blades.

What is generally recommended as great knife for buck in kitchen knife freaks is the Kagayaki CarboNext Series, i recommend the 240mm gyuto ($128.00). Its the standard chefs knife.

http://www.foodieforums.com/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?6-Fred-s-Cutlery-Forum Is a good resource to learn from cooking knives and sharpening.

For generic knifes i recommend forscher/victorinox. Its about the best bang for buck western knife. Not pretty or anything, but gets the work done. Just doesnt hold the edge very long.

2
4bf5827bfb7df85c5b4b485db0945e64

(1386)

on August 15, 2011
at 10:53 PM

Get yourself a Shun chef's knife (pick your favorite) and it will do pretty much 90% of everything. They are beautiful, high-quality knives. Get it sharpened professionally once a year and you are good to go.

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on August 16, 2011
at 02:31 PM

Another vote for Shun knives. We now have three, and they make kitchen work so much more enjoyable. We originally leaned towards German-made knives, but quickly fell in love with the Shun Ken Onion chef's knife once we handled it.

1
84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 16, 2011
at 09:58 AM

Chan Chi Kee 1303 (CCK KF1303).

Meat cleaver.

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/printpost.php?tid/693545/

Heard great things about Victorinox too !

1
2c657a0aca33e505e735477ddd68f4f2

on August 16, 2011
at 07:46 AM

Alton Brown recommends Shun Knives. While I loooove the damascus look, the core of the knife is actually VG-10 steel, a great all-around use steel that is currently in use by several knife companies, including my favorite, Spyderco (who also used to have a line of kitchen knives). VG-10 has great edge retention without being a bear to sharpen, and it also has some nice anti-corrosion qualities. I personally avoid electric sharpeners and hone my knives on a Spyderco Sharpmaker, or in a pinch, the unglazed portion of an upside down coffee mug).

I recently saw some damascus clad VG-10 steel chef knives at Costco for a very good deal, well under a hundred bucks for a Santoku, a standard chef knife, and one other that escapes me at the moment.

1
F6ea948ab43dc51d72509c0989e670fe

(1639)

on August 16, 2011
at 03:35 AM

If you're willing to pay the money, nothing is quite like a Shun. They're expensive, but I threw out all of my other knives after using them. I have an offset bread knife (because serrated knives are cool), a 10'' chef knife, and a paring knife.

If you want to spend a bit less money, grab a Victorinox Forschner Chef knife and a small serrated paring knife as well. The whole kit'll cost you less than $50 and a do a good job. My brother didn't want to drop the cash on the Shun, so that's what he has and he loves them.

1
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on August 16, 2011
at 01:18 AM

Oo, such fun! I love shopping for new steel! You actually don't need much.. it's one of those "less is more" kind of deals. A chef knife. A paring knife. I totally admit that my tomato knife was the best purchase ever and I can slice through soft fruit beautifully.

I'm very advanced in the kitchen and use daily the three knives that I listed - an 8" chef, my 3.5" paring and ye auld serrated tomato knife, and a boning knife that comes out on occasion. I'm not going to give you the brand that I have as every knife is different and brand doesn't matter. You need to go in and hold the knives, if you are in a good shoppe they will have cutting boards and veg/fruit for you to test. For me, the most important factors for my chef knife were and are: it must be forged, the weight, did the knife "rock" the way I wanted when chopping/mincing, can I easily butcher a chicken, and was the bolster comfortable when resting my fingers against it. It HAS to feel good in your hand. This is something you will be using every day so don't look at price tags - there are excellent light knives, stay away from ceramic please they're fragile and can shatter, that are in the $40 range. Wonderful forged in the $100. Of course you can go up in price but I promise, price and brand does not always mean awesome.

Go have fun and play, choose what you think is best for you - just don't cut yourself :)

Oh! And a steel is nice if you want to sharpen your own, I take mine in and have them done by friends.

1
59ee717de524f921efb7f2984157339f

on August 16, 2011
at 12:26 AM

I promise you that there are no better knives than WUSTHOF knives available on the planet.

http://www.wusthof.com/desktopdefault.aspx

MY boyfriend, who is very skilled with meat in the kitchen refuses to cut our huge Paleo Meat roasts and fish and everything else with anything else.

Find a good sale, and get a full set, life time warranty. They will change your whole world in the kitchen!

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on June 22, 2012
at 05:43 AM

Aye wusthof have been in my family for many years.

1
22e9f1dabb279c620977403789aef7dd

(160)

on August 15, 2011
at 10:55 PM

I have this one and like it http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-40520-Fibrox-8-Inch-Chefs/dp/B000638D32/

this is a good utility knife (which I also use as a steak knife) http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-47508-4-Inch-Paring-Knife/dp/B0001V3UYG/

I eventually want to buy these http://www.amazon.com/Wusthof-8pcsteak-8-Piece-Stainless-Steel-Wooden/dp/B0000631ZP/

I have heard Santoku might be better than chefs knives in some applications (have heard good things about Shun and Global, although more expensive)

A quality knife is a good investment (always hand wash).

I want to take a knife skills class to know which knives to use when. Right now I just use the Chefs knife and utility knife for pretty much everything.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on August 16, 2011
at 05:54 AM

I second to Victorinox 8 inch chefs knife. Its a good choice for the money. It isnt as thin of light as some good japanese gyutos. But the price is much less. What i dont understand why many buy santokus, gyuto would be much more suitable for western cooking (its basicly your standard french chefs knife). I guess its mostly a trend.... ;)

0
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on August 16, 2011
at 12:49 AM

http://www.koyoteknives.com/ is a Paleo-eating knifemaker. And (for full disclosure, hoping this doesn't break any site rules about self-promotion!) my husband :) His knives are, on the surface, more oriented towards outdoors use, but he considers food prep to be one of the primary purposes of an outdoors knife, so he designs them with that in mind.

0
E3d9d9309af8338c807257a915eaa44a

on August 15, 2011
at 11:33 PM

Molly your beauty is boundless as your question is timeless to the Paleo Omnivore.

As you have quickly deduced the indispensable items in the Paleo Cave are a good solid cutting board or block. Your choice, wood is easier on the blades but harder to clean. Wood allows you to skewer a slab with a 12 inch fork and hold it in place better than marble.

Knives, 2ea serrated 12 inch blades minimum with a small 6 inch paring knife (which most already have).

Sharpeners, every cave needs a motorized sharpener, mine is part of the can opener. The 12 inch metal rod is what the professionals use (maybe with ceramic blades) but it can be difficult and time consuming. It is the best fine honing device though. Various sharpening stones with differing roughness work good, even the round kind can come in handy with some blades.

I wish the OEMs would give us specs on the stainless steel, serration type-size-frequency and angle of attack of the blade, but they do not (as far as I know). Every Paleo Cave Woman Needs a Paleo Cave Man when it comes to cutting Salmon slabs (after brineing) into ity bity 4oz pieces to be frozen.

Cutting through raw Salmon skin is a job for a Chain Saw or Grizzly Bear but thats what our 12 inch blades are for. Keep the blade parallel with the surface of the cutting block and literally saw through the the Salmon Hide (after de-scaling with a regular fork under running H20 of course).

This is the Paleo Process by which I turn $8/lbs. Salmon into $30/lbs. Lox and then freeze it (which kills any parasites that survived the salt soak).

Cutting through Fillet Mignon or Chick Breast after fighting with Salmon is easy. I usually have to resharpen the knives after each 2-3 lbs. batch. After about 5-6 lbs. of Salmon sawing the blades become almost useless (and even dangerous) without sharpening.

I ate a 4oz. piece of raw Fillet Mignon once (brine'd) and it felt like I ate the whole cow. I'm afraid of getting worms so I've not attempted it since (but if you like ringworms as part of your protein go for it).

Me Paleo Man eat Salmon raw, you Paleo Woman maybe like too, good omega-3, yum.

Knives + Tax Comes to about $90 (one Grizzly Bear Hide or One Saber Tooth Tiger Fang).,.

http://www.chefsresource.com/forshner-fibrox-12-inch-granton-edge-slicing-knife-47645.html The Forschner Fibrox 12 Inch granton edge slicing knife just won a Cook's Illustrated test of slicing knives, this knife was the top pick and was the only "highly recommended" knife. This Forschner Fibrox 12 inch slicing knife is a long knife, great for larger items like roasts and turkeys. The granton blade (scalloped) reduces sticking while slicing and allows for wonderful thin slices. Forshner Fibrox knives by Victorinox are NSF approved for commercial food service use (and are a common sight in restaurant kitchens)... $40

http://www.chefsresource.com/8-chefs-knife-forschner-fibrox-cutlery.html In the spirit of Swiss cutlery, Victorinox designed a knife for the kitchen that, like a Swiss army knife, does it all. The Victorinox Forschner Fibrox 8 inch Chef's Knife has an 8 inch blade of high-carbon stainless steel... Blade measures 8 inches. Hand-washing recommended. $30

http://www.chefsresource.com/accusharp-knife-tool-sharpener.html The AccuSharp knife and tool sharpener is a simple, inexpensive but effective manual knife sharpener. Cook's Illustrated gave this sharpener their top rating in a comparison test against many higher-priced sharpeners. The AccuSharp can sharpen kitchen knives (even serrated knives) but an also work with many other tools, such as pocket knives, cleavers, shears and more. The AccuSharp knife and tool sharpener is a commercial grade sharpener with a lifetime manufacturer's warranty ... not recommend it for sharpening Japanese knives (Global, Shun) which have a different blade angle than most knives... $11

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 16, 2011
at 05:50 AM

I eat raw filet mignon, unbrined, all the time. If you trust your source, you've got nothing to worry about.

E3d9d9309af8338c807257a915eaa44a

(10)

on September 01, 2011
at 12:51 AM

Thanks for the tip (went high end on the mignon 1-2oz. goes a long ways) yummy in my tummy. Thanks also for the meat cleaver. Putting a big swing on a hammer to the back chops through frozen meat nicely. Now if I can just find the 5lb mini-sledge hammer and really big meat cleaver...

0
Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

on August 15, 2011
at 11:00 PM

Personally, my favorite is Global (Anthony Bourdain's favorite too!). However, that being said, nothing is as good as feeling it in your hand. Find a good cutlery shop or even a Williams-Sonoma where you can feel what each knife feels like. One will call out to you and just fit right. Not only will this help with how the handle feels, but also will help you decide which size to get.

Also, I tend to stay away from big block sets. I do have one but they are fairly cheap and I use them for the steak knives and cutting through bone, chocolate and such where brute force is needed over precision.

A good chef's, a couple sizes of paring, and a boning knife should outfit you for 90% of what you'll need. Dont feel the need to get all ofthese from the same brand, remember, how it feels is way more important. If your knife has a speicifc sharpener, buy it and use it. Keep them sharp. Not only is a dull knife a pain in the ass, its a hazard as it can slip off food and onto the hand that is holding the food.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on August 16, 2011
at 10:01 AM

Globals are ok, they have done their marketing well. But there are better deals if you are willing to learn about japanese knives. Like the CarboNext series.

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