2

votes

Opinions on my limited, kitchenless diet...?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 10, 2011 at 1:58 PM

I'm currently living in a dorm-like building with one shared kitchen. The kitchen is a mess, often crowded, and I don't like chatting with strangers while I cook, so I want to try basically avoiding it altogether.

As for goals, I need to lose fat. That is first and foremost. I do not mind a repetitive diet. In fact, I prefer it.

So, I was thinking about basically living on canned tuna, bananas, and grass-fed butter for the next couple of months. This provides my protein, fat, and carb needs. I know it's far from the ideal of grassfed steaks and sweet potatoes - but it still seems pretty healthy to me. And cheap and easy as well.

Has anyone had experience with a Spartan diet like this? I know it'll be bland, but that doesn't bother me much. I do better when I suck it up and just focus on simple and easy meals. Like I said, I know it's not ideal - but I'm currently eating fast food, so it would be a huge improvement from that.

8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

(1724)

on October 11, 2011
at 08:59 AM

Yep, Senneth, just take a small bite and then a ripe avocado is easy to eat and peel. Believe it or not, avocados existed long before the knife and fork were invented.

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on October 11, 2011
at 04:35 AM

If you're worried about mercury from canned fish go for sardines. Also selenium appears to protect the body from mercury toxicity - and many sea foods are high in selenium.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 11, 2011
at 01:15 AM

Nor would I leave anything anywhere public, I was referring to leaving it cook in your room....if you can...

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on October 10, 2011
at 08:19 PM

So to clarify, anything that cooks has to be in the shared kitchen? If so that is hard, but if you can have something in your room you can be golden.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:39 PM

In a public kitchen, I'd be leery about leaving anything lying around like that. Not so much that they'd steal the crockpot, but in that by the time you get to it when the cooking is done, it'd be empty... :)

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:37 PM

Short lived fish like salmon/sardines have less mercury exposure than long lived fish like tuna.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 10, 2011
at 06:08 PM

Your teeth and some peeling would be my guess.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:24 PM

I really would like to know how you get an avocado out of its skin without utensils!

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:20 PM

I read somewhere that one shouldnt have more than 4 cans of tuna a week to avoid mercury poisioning. It sounds like you'd be doing alot of tuna a week, so I'd be concerned for you.

6da7ce6a4a250c46a6e78b5b4e22da83

(987)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:18 PM

Why the salmon/sardines? Is there less mercury?

6da7ce6a4a250c46a6e78b5b4e22da83

(987)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:10 PM

I hear so many conflicting reports about mercury, I wasn't sure how dangerous it actually is. Perhaps I'll look at the store for something like jerky, just to be safe. I defaulted to the bananas because they're meant to replace things like sweet potatoes, and bananas are starchy. Also, I'm trying to keep things simple, which means finding a limited number of things I know I can and will buy and eat. Thanks for the other suggestions.

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15 Answers

3
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:07 PM

i would suggest canned salmon/sardines instead of only tuna. you could also add the occasional serving of nuts.

6da7ce6a4a250c46a6e78b5b4e22da83

(987)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:18 PM

Why the salmon/sardines? Is there less mercury?

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:37 PM

Short lived fish like salmon/sardines have less mercury exposure than long lived fish like tuna.

3
27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:01 PM

  1. Tuna - that's lots of mercury, even if you're not a female of childbearing age. Can you add in more proteins (beef jerky can be expensive but that's one option. Raw eggs are another option - buy a half dozen and eat all at once). You could also go for sardines and canned salmon.

  2. Fats - butter is always good, but I'd think coconut oil is also an option. Avocados are too. You just need a knife and spoon for those.

  3. Any reason bananas are your only produce?

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:20 PM

I read somewhere that one shouldnt have more than 4 cans of tuna a week to avoid mercury poisioning. It sounds like you'd be doing alot of tuna a week, so I'd be concerned for you.

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on October 11, 2011
at 04:35 AM

If you're worried about mercury from canned fish go for sardines. Also selenium appears to protect the body from mercury toxicity - and many sea foods are high in selenium.

6da7ce6a4a250c46a6e78b5b4e22da83

(987)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:10 PM

I hear so many conflicting reports about mercury, I wasn't sure how dangerous it actually is. Perhaps I'll look at the store for something like jerky, just to be safe. I defaulted to the bananas because they're meant to replace things like sweet potatoes, and bananas are starchy. Also, I'm trying to keep things simple, which means finding a limited number of things I know I can and will buy and eat. Thanks for the other suggestions.

2
78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

on October 10, 2011
at 11:21 PM

Wake up earlier or go to bed later & use the kitchen. Wear headphones while cooking.

2
8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

on October 10, 2011
at 08:43 PM

You can hard-boil eggs in an electric kettle ( like this) - just put eggs & cold water in it, let it boil, and let it sit for 10 mins. Thanks to Alton Brown for that tip!

2
8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

on October 10, 2011
at 02:40 PM

There are a lot of other veggies and fruits you can eat for variety -- tomatoes, bananas, oranges, pears, plums, etc (depending on what's in season and available). You don't actually need utensils to eat an avocado. I would HIGHLY recommend those. In addition to coconut oil, you can also get shredded coconut (again variety).

I assume you are not allowed to have a hot plate? Have you thought of that?

Another option might be to sneak down to the kitchen once a week when no one else is around to boil up a couple dozen eggs or even throw a whole chicken into the oven. Then you can munch on those as the week goes along.

Also, see if you can find any good quality deli meats -- salami, etc. There are some that aren't full of sugar and gluten.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:24 PM

I really would like to know how you get an avocado out of its skin without utensils!

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 10, 2011
at 06:08 PM

Your teeth and some peeling would be my guess.

8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

(1724)

on October 11, 2011
at 08:59 AM

Yep, Senneth, just take a small bite and then a ripe avocado is easy to eat and peel. Believe it or not, avocados existed long before the knife and fork were invented.

1
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:19 PM

Are you allowed to have a crock pot?

I'd check to see, because you can toss alot of different things together and make a meal while you are in class.

A small toaster oven?

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:39 PM

In a public kitchen, I'd be leery about leaving anything lying around like that. Not so much that they'd steal the crockpot, but in that by the time you get to it when the cooking is done, it'd be empty... :)

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 11, 2011
at 01:15 AM

Nor would I leave anything anywhere public, I was referring to leaving it cook in your room....if you can...

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on October 10, 2011
at 08:19 PM

So to clarify, anything that cooks has to be in the shared kitchen? If so that is hard, but if you can have something in your room you can be golden.

1
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:18 PM

If you can tolerate milk that will help lot in your situation.

0
D117467bf8e8472464ece2b81509606c

(2873)

on October 11, 2011
at 02:21 AM

If you're concerned about mercury, chunk light is supposed to have significantly less of it... plus it's a lot cheaper than solid!

0
324bf94d3d6f9322d6e4dba4becfaab1

on October 10, 2011
at 11:01 PM

I cook everything I eat, which is pretty much just steak and potatoes, with an indoor electric grill and a toaster oven. Stoves, microwaves, refrigerators, and dishwashers are nice, especially for big families, but for a single guy they're not worth it IMO.

0
2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on October 10, 2011
at 09:14 PM

Would definitely add some sardines, anchovies as well to add some quick protein to whatever meal you are eating.

If you are including dairy, definitely get yourself some full fat greek yogurt. Add in some berries, if you are low on calories for the day, sprinkle in some nuts.

Another great option for situations like this is frozen burger patties and Applegate cold cuts (ham, turkey, roast beef).'

Also get a few cans of coconut milk. Can use for smoothies (once again I try not to make smoothies often, but can be great for quick calories, or situations where you can't really cook), deserts, etc.

0
Af005ec9a8e028f2b04bf5367b64e0d6

on October 10, 2011
at 08:51 PM

Get a pressure cooker: you can hard boil eggs, cook potatoes, cook meat. It's a one item kitchen and it plugs into the wall.

Like this (never used it, just an example)

0
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on October 10, 2011
at 08:30 PM

I could not take something this grim, and that is saying something because I have spent the last month living off of bone broth and freshly juiced veggies. If you can more power to you.

In a similar circumstance I think I would do weekly pots of stew- done in the crockpot overnight (most people will not eat night foods for breakfast) then stashed and reheated as needed for the week, a weeks worth of stew is cheap and you can use frozen veggies, you can even freeze some to swap out. If you use a crock pot liner and store in disposable bags and heat in paper plates it is virtually mess free and a little more sustainable.

The other option is to find a housemate who does like cooking and just pay them off to cook for you too within guidelines and stash it for later with your name. You might not find someone who is already Paleo, but you might find someone who is willing to try. Anyone who understands some kitchen basics will know that cooking for two is not that much more trouble so this might be easier to come by then you expect.

Either way will get you more fresh food in a greater variety which is something I would prioritize over rigid compliance using repetitive canned foods any day.

0
6e24575aafccf63e02172715b3cd60ef

on October 10, 2011
at 06:17 PM

Frying mince can be done very quicky, chuck in some frozen diced veg etc.

Also microwave potatoes and rice, dump canned fish into the rice.

0
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on October 10, 2011
at 05:29 PM

I would not think that a diet consisting entirely or primarily of canned tuna, bananas, and butter would provide anywhere near optimal, or even adequate, nutrition. You do have to pay some attention to vitamins and minerals, not just macronutrient balance.

There are plenty of other options that can be stored (for at least a few days), prepared, and eaten at room temperature. Look at raw vegan recipes. Not that I'm proposing a raw vegan lifestyle, but it will give you plenty of options that don't require more than a knife and cutting board. If you have access to a refrigerator, crock pot, or toaster oven, your options increase even more.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 10, 2011
at 02:43 PM

Can of fish, can of veggies, fat of choice, spice of choice. Mix all in a bowl, microwave (assuming you have one) until heated through. Shouldn't take more than 5 minutes to open 2 cans, walk down to your kitchen area, and microwave it to desired temperature.

In my area, some local butcher shops also sell things like canned beef, pork, chicken, etc... Precooked, you simply reheat.

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