2

votes

This caveman needs cutlery! Shopping advice please,. (pic. of old set below)

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 21, 2012 at 12:23 AM

I've been Paleo for over 3 months and there's no way I'm going back to my SAD, old ways.

Therefore, I think I'll enjoy the process of cooking and eating more if I upgrade my knives.

I've been using this for 15 years: alt text

I've never sharped them (not sure if I was supposed to).

Without going crazy, how much should I budget for this next investment?

Should I get the kind that require sharpening (seems like a hassle)?

What would you do different if you had to purchase knives all over again?

A link to something appropriate on amazon would be particularly helpful.

I guess I should mention that I'm not coordinated enough to chop open a coconut without chopping off my hand, so a hatchet won't be high on my shopping list.

My one and only attempt to cut up a raw whole chicken was a disgusting mess (perhaps because I didn't have a good set of knives).

I recognize that a good set of quality knives will cost some money, and I'm ok with that.

Thoughts?

Caveman Mike

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:29 AM

sharpen every couple of days? you'd have no knife in a year! you mean HONE. http://www.home-ec101.com/honing-v-sharpening/

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:27 AM

also, many knife sharpeners set up shop at or near farmers markets.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:27 AM

Sur le table actually does it year round, but FREE twice a year (one of those is usually in october which is when I get mine done)

C4fa226c86c0ac5d2f49b48069c1c1a8

(120)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:05 AM

I'll scnd the global brand. LOVE them.

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on May 23, 2012
at 05:00 PM

FYI, if you live near a Sur le Table or Williams & Sonoma, they may do professional knife-sharpening in-store certain times of year. The ones we lived near brought in someone from Shun annually for this purpose.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 22, 2012
at 05:22 AM

And you need a fine grit stone to reach optimal sharpness. With soft western blades, finer grits than 1200 are usually useless, cause the steel is too soft to hold an angle like that. But with for instance high quality White Steel Yanagi, one usually goes up to 10 000 grit for final stone. Then go cut your sashimi ;)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 22, 2012
at 05:20 AM

Nonsense, i you believe a knife needs to be shapened only once a year you must not have very high standards for sharpness. What good is a great knife when you cant keep it sharp!? After all, sharpening is one of the most paleo skills. If you want to take good care of your blade, you keep it surgical sharp. If you leave it without sharpening for too long, you need to use coarser stones, and that wears the blade more than little daily (if cooking a lot) or weekly sharpening is much easier. With a high grit stone, like 5000.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 10:53 PM

great youtube! Knive WON! Tomato ZERO!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 10:43 PM

Can all knives be sharpened? I thought that only certain types can.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 10:38 PM

I'm a big fan of the dishwasher!

859af12281c567486707a401862ce4d9

(50)

on May 21, 2012
at 10:24 PM

Why don't you just have the knives you own sharpened by a professional knife sharpener before you buy something else. You might be surprised how much you like your old knives now that they actualy can cut something. !!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on May 21, 2012
at 09:11 PM

Oh crap, forgot to add that out of all the great advice people have given just remember that knives are a super personal purchase. Well, at least to me. Someone could love their Shun but I prefer Kikuichi, etc. Take notes and go have a fun day at a knife shop. If they're good they should be able to whip out a cutting board and something for you to practice on. Now good luck for reals :)

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on May 21, 2012
at 08:51 PM

I cook and use my knives hard. I don't need much which is great when living in a small apt in Brooklyn. My collection: 1-10" chef, 1-paring, 1-tomato knife, 2-kitchen shears (one meat/one veg). These I use daily. The tomato knife was a whim purchase and a good one. Absolutely fantastic on soft fruit. Get your basics, keep them SHARP please - treat them nice and they'll return the favor :) You don't need to drop a ton of bucks, either. What I look for: How does the handle feel, is the bolster comfie, does the knife rock well. Does it seem lightweight, sharp, flexible. Easy to use. Good luck!

5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on May 21, 2012
at 08:18 PM

Or you can just take them in once a year and pay someone else $10; which is way easier in my opinion.

5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on May 21, 2012
at 08:17 PM

Understandable, all I was saying was that knives vary greatly in terms of how they feel in your hand; thereby influencing utility, and it would be helpful not to prejudge based on how much you think you might have to sharpen or whatever.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 21, 2012
at 05:27 PM

Sometimes I cut up meat with them (or trim it). They're useful for quick veggie or meat trims, like cutting the veins out of things. I also grab them for cutting butcher's twine or cheesecloth if I'm using those for something. Opening packages, cutting through pieces of poultry at the joints... All sorts of stuff. You don't have to spend a ton of money on them, but having a pair of shears is really useful. I think I got a good pair about 10 years ago for $20 bucks? I found some I really love that come apart for washing that cost more, but spending more is totally unnecessary.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 04:06 PM

@CaveMan_Mike: As blueballoon said, sharpening is cheap. And the dishwasher ruins them. If you're going to spend the money on quality, you've got to take care of them. If the dishwasher is an issue, just buy the crappy stuff at the store for $15-20 each and throw them out when they get dull.

Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:33 PM

Why is that? Our http://www.amazon.com/ChefsChoice-Diamond-Electric-Sharpener-Asian-Style/dp/B0016N9ZT2/ does fine sharpening our shuns.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:23 PM

this thread has been invaluable because it exposed the issues of sharpening (pro or at home), must-dry, magnetic handle storage (seems cool), etc.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:21 PM

What's the kitchen shears for?

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:18 PM

Discoloring if not dry? Deal-killer. Did I mention I'm a lazy caveman?

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:12 PM

You will never get good sharpness with globals using this thing.

1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:06 PM

I'm not a religious sharpener either, as the knives I have don't really need it. I can't personally back up that advice; it's just what I've heard recommended by pros and my chef friends.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:55 AM

I don't sharpen that often. Clearly everyone's different, though. Anyhow, I use my knives multiple times daily. It is important to hone the knives (correctly--ask the pro when you get your knives sharpened to show you how).

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:53 AM

Professionally sharpened doesn't mean it'll cost a lot. I get mine sharpened a few times a year for $10/knife. Do NOT put knives into the dishwasher. You'll dull the blade. It takes what, 3 minutes to wash them?

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:27 AM

OMG: sharpening every couple days!! YIKES!! What am I getting myself into here! I want better knives to save time, not spend time!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:26 AM

OMG: if I step up my cutlery game, I have to get knives professionally sharpened? And, no dishwasher? YIKES! This sounds like a step backward into stone ages!! Perhaps I should refine my criteria to be home sharpened and dishwasher friendly.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:20 AM

nonetheless, i'm not coordinated to do that either without thwacking my hand off. I bought a new XO peeler, and while trying it out on a butternut squash, I swung and missed and it took a chunk out of my fingernail (thank goodness it didn't hit skin and I didn't bleed). Bottom line: I need to be careful around sharp things!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:14 AM

You don't chop open coconuts. :) Find the "face" (three circles on the husk somewhere), hold it face up (ha ha) in one hand, and take the back edge (not the sharp side) and give it a strong thwack. It should split right open.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 12:43 AM

Thanks @VB: a person after my own heart. Before making a major purchase, I do tend to research things to death. I've been spending every waking moment trying to get up to speed on all this paleo stuff (asking & answering questions on paleo hacks, and listening to all back robb wolf podcasts). I didn't have the energy to start from scratch on this knive project, so I figured I'd throw it out for comment. Thanks!

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18 Answers

4
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on May 21, 2012
at 02:12 AM

Woo! Knife thread!

Until you get to the point of needing specialty knives, I recommend buying good quality cutlery and purchasing an 8" chef's knife, an 8-10" serrated bread knife (more on that later) and a pairing knife in the 3-4.5" range. If you plan on breaking down chickens or fish, or deboning any kinds of roasts, add a cheap boning knife from the grocery store.

The bread knife (mine has an offset handle) can take the place of a carving knife for things like pork roast or boneless turkey breast, and they're great for tomatoes.

80-90% of your work will probably be done with the chef's knife, with the rest split between the pairing and serrated knife. Don't skimp on quality! The "Seen On TV" knives are more like saws than knives; they work with an abrasive edge to grind between the food you're cutting, and they are impossible to sharpen. If you want to go cheap, buy the TV junk and throw them out every 3 months or so and get a new set.

I'd also plan on spending between $50 and $150 per knife. It sounds expensive, but a properly cared for knife should last a good 50 years with average home use, or 10-20 if you're a home chef type. If you don't cook multiple times a day (or just about every night for dinner)m plan on getting the knives professionally sharpened every 8-12 months. NEVER put fine cutlery in the dishwasher, or cut with a granite, cement, or glass cutting board; the steel used in the blades is intentionally soft to hold an edge better and those materials will destroy the edge, making it necessary to grind off more material when sharpening and reduce the lifespan of the knife.

All that said, I've got to go with KM: the Shunk knives are the best and most comfortable I've ever used. I can't stand their angled handle designs, though; the Damascus patterned blades are a dream to use and they look beautiful.

One more word on sharpening: don't do it yourself, especially with the Shun knives; they have a Japanese style blade, so the angles on home sharpeners are totally wrong and they'll ruin the knife. Add to that the horrible quality of home sharpeners, and they're just not worth it. If you really want to sharpen your own, take a look at the Edge Pro Apex system. It's pricey, but it's the most reliable sharpening system I've found outside of a professional sharpening shop. If you go that route, plan on buying a few cheapo store brand knives to ruin while you practice with it.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on May 21, 2012
at 04:06 PM

@CaveMan_Mike: As blueballoon said, sharpening is cheap. And the dishwasher ruins them. If you're going to spend the money on quality, you've got to take care of them. If the dishwasher is an issue, just buy the crappy stuff at the store for $15-20 each and throw them out when they get dull.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:26 AM

OMG: if I step up my cutlery game, I have to get knives professionally sharpened? And, no dishwasher? YIKES! This sounds like a step backward into stone ages!! Perhaps I should refine my criteria to be home sharpened and dishwasher friendly.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:53 AM

Professionally sharpened doesn't mean it'll cost a lot. I get mine sharpened a few times a year for $10/knife. Do NOT put knives into the dishwasher. You'll dull the blade. It takes what, 3 minutes to wash them?

Da8e709acde269e8b8bfbc09d1737841

(1906)

on May 23, 2012
at 05:00 PM

FYI, if you live near a Sur le Table or Williams & Sonoma, they may do professional knife-sharpening in-store certain times of year. The ones we lived near brought in someone from Shun annually for this purpose.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:27 AM

also, many knife sharpeners set up shop at or near farmers markets.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:27 AM

Sur le table actually does it year round, but FREE twice a year (one of those is usually in october which is when I get mine done)

3
1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:50 AM

You should always sharpen your knives occasionally, even if they aren't professional quality. Like Hanley said, Globals are great, and fairly reasonably priced. I've been using Chicago Cutlery for ages, and they work great for what I need.

Just keep in mind, if you go for really nice knives (like Wusthofs or Sabatiers), you should sharpen them by hand every couple of days. They're gorgeous knives, but there is a time investment involved. If you don't need to hand-sharpen, get a drag-through sharpener???quick, easy, and puts a good edge on.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:27 AM

OMG: sharpening every couple days!! YIKES!! What am I getting myself into here! I want better knives to save time, not spend time!

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 21, 2012
at 11:55 AM

I don't sharpen that often. Clearly everyone's different, though. Anyhow, I use my knives multiple times daily. It is important to hone the knives (correctly--ask the pro when you get your knives sharpened to show you how).

1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:06 PM

I'm not a religious sharpener either, as the knives I have don't really need it. I can't personally back up that advice; it's just what I've heard recommended by pros and my chef friends.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:29 AM

sharpen every couple of days? you'd have no knife in a year! you mean HONE. http://www.home-ec101.com/honing-v-sharpening/

2
5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 21, 2012
at 10:35 AM

While you're doing research into new knives and figuring out exactly what you need, learn to sharpen them by practicing on your old ones. New knives won't be much help if you can't keep a good edge on them, and good knives will need to be sharpened. It's not rocket science; it's just a matter of getting into the habit of doing it. And slicing things cleanly and effortlessly with a freshly-sharpened knife can be downright pleasurable.

I'm a pretty simple, straightforward cook, and only use three knives on a regular basis: an 8" chef's knife, a 6" sandwich knife, and a paring knife, all made by Wusthof. I bought them as a set for about $170, and it was money well spent, as they handle virtually all of the knifework that needs doing around here.

If I was buying larger hunks of meat or breaking down whole birds on a regular basis I'd get a cleaver, but right now I'm fine without it. I've also considered buying a Japanese vegetable knife, because I really like the one a friend has, but again it's not a burning need.

I still own a huge serrated bread knife, but it now serves to cut up cardboard boxes so they fit in the recycling bin. It goes through cardboard like it was made to do just that. Irrelevant, but awesome.

Good steak knives are another thing to consider. Mine are crap and need replacing, and I have no idea why I haven't done so yet. Don't be me--get yourself some nice steak knives.

Oh, and heavy-duty kitchen shears are relatively cheap and always come in handy. I'm always finding a new use for them, and honestly don't know what I'd do without them.

C4fa226c86c0ac5d2f49b48069c1c1a8

(120)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:05 AM

I'll scnd the global brand. LOVE them.

1
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on May 21, 2012
at 08:09 PM

My favorite knife in my kitchen is my Wustof-Trident Santoku. Over a decade ago I stocked my pantry with a 8" chef knife, a 6" santoku, and a Chinese cleaver all from Wustof as I had severe envy of other students of the culinary arts with deeper pockets (my early knives were the "Yugos" of the culinary world, entry-level Victorinox knives - which I still have btw).

For your needs, a santoku knife is one of the more versatile shapes, sizes, and weights out there. It works well on smaller cutting boards (like the cheap bamboo ones you find at your local megamart) and there some actual good deals on midrange knives out there (there are entry-level Henckels in department stores for around $35 that I wouldn't mind using in a pinch). Even the cheap entry-level Henckels have better steel than the crap ones.

Any other knives of merit? A flexible boning/fillet knife is very useful if you butcher small primal cuts (bone in cuts), a traditional heavy-tang chef's knife is good for chopping bulk veggies such as celery and carrots for stews. Finally, a couple of good paring knives. I like to buy victorinox ones from Restaurant supply stores, as they are cheap but the steel is still decent, and paring knives tend to get lost/misplaced or misused quite frequently - it's just not worth spending a lot of money on them.

So, if money is a consideration, you can invest in ONE good knife (personally for me, the santoku fits that bill), and for a bit more of an investment you can go ahead and have four knives that will serve almost every purpose you need a kitchen knife for.

1
41f5a72332ecb08a00eb1bf3a15092b2

on May 21, 2012
at 07:30 PM

If you want knives that are good tools, but don't need them to be works of art, just buy a Victorinox/Forschner 8 inch Chef's knife and paring knife. You can get the chef's knife for about $25-30, paring knife for $5 or $6 if you search Amazon. They are always rated best buys by Cook's Illustrated magazine, and they're my go to knives at home.

To keep the knives sharp, use a honing steel to align the edge every few times you use your knives. If you don't abuse your knives (washing in the dishwasher, or cutting on a glass cutting board), you probably only need to have them sharpened or sharpen them on a sharpening stone once a year.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 10:38 PM

I'm a big fan of the dishwasher!

1
5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on May 21, 2012
at 02:12 PM

Everyone will have a different preference. You need to go try some on at a store as some others have mentioned. Until you do that and figure out what you like, future research is pointless imo.

Personally, I like the Japanese knives (Shun) because they make me feel like a samurai.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:23 PM

this thread has been invaluable because it exposed the issues of sharpening (pro or at home), must-dry, magnetic handle storage (seems cool), etc.

5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on May 21, 2012
at 08:17 PM

Understandable, all I was saying was that knives vary greatly in terms of how they feel in your hand; thereby influencing utility, and it would be helpful not to prejudge based on how much you think you might have to sharpen or whatever.

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on May 21, 2012
at 12:02 PM

I am in love with Shun knives. The drawback is that you'll have to get them professionally sharpened a few times a year.

I have a larger santoku/chef's knife, a serrated knife (read: bread knife) for slicing tomatoes and carving some meats, a paring knife, and a cleaver. The cleaver isn't something I'd recommend for a person only just getting into good knives, but I find it useful for a lot of situations (butchering birds, etc.). You could easily get by with a good chef's knife and a paring knife only.

My biggest word of advice would be to go to a specialty store (or even a Williams-Sonoma) and see how the knives feel in your hand. I've tried a number of different knives over the years and I didn't like how they felt. If it's not comfortable for your hand, it's not worth the money.

Oh- I'm going to second (or third?) other advice: Get some good kitchen shears as well. I use mine at least daily.

Last bit of advice: Once you find the knife you want, WAIT until it goes on sale. If you do Amazon, look there. Look on the Williams-Sonoma website. (Etcetera.) I got all of my knives with at least a 30-40% discount. (That makes them a bit more affordable.)

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:21 PM

What's the kitchen shears for?

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 21, 2012
at 05:27 PM

Sometimes I cut up meat with them (or trim it). They're useful for quick veggie or meat trims, like cutting the veins out of things. I also grab them for cutting butcher's twine or cheesecloth if I'm using those for something. Opening packages, cutting through pieces of poultry at the joints... All sorts of stuff. You don't have to spend a ton of money on them, but having a pair of shears is really useful. I think I got a good pair about 10 years ago for $20 bucks? I found some I really love that come apart for washing that cost more, but spending more is totally unnecessary.

1
Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on May 21, 2012
at 08:43 AM

I cook daily and 90% of it is done with a 7" carbon steel vintage ( garage sale) chef knife. It sharpens like a dream. I highly reccomend getting a small easy to use sharpener. You will wonder why you didn't years ago. I did. I have a large very nice Henckel chef knife too, but I seldom reach for it. My knife advice is find one good knife that fits your hand, is nicely balanced and learn to sharpen it. A sharp knife makes cooking faster and easier. You really only need one decent knife. Ok, some like a paring knife too, but my good serrated bread has not seen the light of day since the bread when away. For on the go, I love French made Opinel knives. These are carbon steel too, so unlike stainless you have to dry them throughly or they will discolor. One lives in my car, one in my purse. Its surprising handy to travel w a knife. Beyond cutting up fruit, cheese and sausage snacks for the kids, I've harvested wild plants, filleted fish. And it's a game changer to BYOK when cooking at someone's house and they only have a big block of crappy knives. Opinel knives come in a variety of sizes to fit ones hand and are available inexpensively on amazon and elsewhere. Go to a resturant supply or fancy cooking store to hold different knives rather than buying online. You want one that feels right at home in your hand. Either place should be able to offer sharpening, or sell a drag through sharpener. Have fun shopping around!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:18 PM

Discoloring if not dry? Deal-killer. Did I mention I'm a lazy caveman?

1
Ed8045e8840404b023764f1ea2cb6a5e

(191)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:51 AM

My favorite knives are Shun: paring knife and 7" knife. I have 2 other bigger knives, but these two are what I always reach for first. They have a nice weight and the way they are shaped allows for your hand to fit comfortably below the handle. I also have a magnetic knife hanging strip that is mounted above my counter.

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 21, 2012
at 12:35 AM

Hi Mike, thanks for the question.

I am a crazy shopper because it takes me months (sometimes years) to do my research because I buy nothing but the best (or what I consider the best in my situation).

So...

I bought knives that I am very happy with but you won't be able to get them because they are from Europe. Actually, they are made in Finland.

But I can tell you the features that I really really like so you can see if you would like the same in knives.

First of all, I hate those wooden holders where most people keep their knives. I don't think they are hygienic.

Second of all, I hate those plastic handles because food gets stuck between the handles and the blade. You really cannot wash them properly.

The knives I have now are seamless and are made of one piece of metal - handles and all. No metal stubs (or whatever you call those knobs). All metal, one piece. No place for food particles to get stuck. Extremely hygienic.

I personally do not like larger knives and prefer small ones. So I did not buy a set - I bought about six small paring knifes. I also own two larger knives, but I never use them - just don't like them I guess.

I cut chicken bones with special kitchen scissors.

I have heard a lot of good things about Kyocera knives... but I am happy with my knives and I would never change them for anything else.

See what works for you and buy accordingly.

My knives look a little like these http://www.kaboodle.com/reviews/chicago-cutlery-insignia-steel-18-piece-cutlery-block-set

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 12:43 AM

Thanks @VB: a person after my own heart. Before making a major purchase, I do tend to research things to death. I've been spending every waking moment trying to get up to speed on all this paleo stuff (asking & answering questions on paleo hacks, and listening to all back robb wolf podcasts). I didn't have the energy to start from scratch on this knive project, so I figured I'd throw it out for comment. Thanks!

0
C7bea2b4a21affa567a4405c69c45715

on July 25, 2012
at 01:44 AM

I spent a few years in the wonderful state of Alaska. While I was there I came upon the ulu. BEST THING EVER!!

http://www.ulu.com/

0
7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

on July 24, 2012
at 09:11 PM

I saw some ceramic knives at Best Bath and Beyond.

Any thoughts on Ceramic knives?

Thanks, Mike

0
3d6e108c07dc40433b4b0b2e09fa9c0e

on May 21, 2012
at 08:15 PM

I got my knives at IKEA and I love them. They weren't too expensive and they sharpen up nicely.

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/categories/series/07688/

0
Dcf355a2a13a1cdac6b8932a145fbd9d

(278)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:48 PM

Best knife shop in the whole wide world.

http://korin.com/Brands/Korin_2

0
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:09 PM

First learn how to sharpen. With waterstones. Get a good medium grit stone like Bester 1200. Then buy a 240mm Carbonext gyuto from here: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/KAGAYAKICarboNextSeries.html

I personally own aritsugu a type 240mm blade. Its thicker. I bought the Carbonext for my bro as a gift, and its thin as laser and the blade is very high quality. Best bang for buck that i know. It doesnt come laser sharp out of box but japanese chefs know how to sharpen so the knives are never fully finished. It will easily cut rotten tomatoes to thin slices when you have sharpened it properly.

If you have more money, Konosuke HD 240mm is better finished but the blade quality is about equal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTHD2J2za6Y

5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on May 21, 2012
at 08:18 PM

Or you can just take them in once a year and pay someone else $10; which is way easier in my opinion.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 21, 2012
at 10:53 PM

great youtube! Knive WON! Tomato ZERO!

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 22, 2012
at 05:20 AM

Nonsense, i you believe a knife needs to be shapened only once a year you must not have very high standards for sharpness. What good is a great knife when you cant keep it sharp!? After all, sharpening is one of the most paleo skills. If you want to take good care of your blade, you keep it surgical sharp. If you leave it without sharpening for too long, you need to use coarser stones, and that wears the blade more than little daily (if cooking a lot) or weekly sharpening is much easier. With a high grit stone, like 5000.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 22, 2012
at 05:22 AM

And you need a fine grit stone to reach optimal sharpness. With soft western blades, finer grits than 1200 are usually useless, cause the steel is too soft to hold an angle like that. But with for instance high quality White Steel Yanagi, one usually goes up to 10 000 grit for final stone. Then go cut your sashimi ;)

0
Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on May 21, 2012
at 05:28 AM

This knife sharpener not only looks great, it also does a fine job to both sharpen and hone your knives: Vulkanus

0
Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:28 AM

I love my http://www.amazon.com/Chefs-Choice-120-Professional-Sharpener/dp/B00004S1B8/

Shun knives are great. There's an asian sharpener model if you go that route (the globals mentioned above are asian).

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on May 21, 2012
at 01:12 PM

You will never get good sharpness with globals using this thing.

Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on May 21, 2012
at 03:33 PM

Why is that? Our http://www.amazon.com/ChefsChoice-Diamond-Electric-Sharpener-Asian-Style/dp/B0016N9ZT2/ does fine sharpening our shuns.

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