8

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Do you need a kettlebell if you have a toddler?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 27, 2011 at 11:18 AM

So, I haven't used one before, but I was eyeballing the kettlebells at our local sporting goods store the other day, and contemplating the muscles used to swing it. My day is pretty much spent picking up and putting down a child, which has resulted in some wicked guns and good muscle tone in my shoulders, is there further benefit to be derived from that ol' kettlebell?

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 28, 2011
at 01:18 PM

True that! That's why I prefer kettlebells to babybells.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 28, 2011
at 03:38 AM

Reminds me of the (Greek?) wrestler whose strength was attributed to growing up with a calf who he carried up and down a hill every day of his life....till the day he was a man and the calf was a full grown cow he continued to do such. Probably just a little bit of BS in there, but I'm sure we could make it as far as the teen years as long as you dont feed em too much :)

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 27, 2011
at 09:01 PM

Toddles body squats, with a little explosive jump is awesome for he legs and the kids love it :)

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on December 27, 2011
at 08:52 PM

I've been seriously lacking in the ab department since having the little guy, so I guess I need to either work on my form picking him up to engage the abs more, or go for the real metal kettlebell.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on December 27, 2011
at 08:49 PM

I was marveling at that concept the other day, I used to think he was heavy when he was 6 months old and would have to either wear him in a carrier or put him down after a short while, but now I can walk home from the store a few blocks away carrying a squirming 2 year old with one arm and bags with the other.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on December 27, 2011
at 08:46 PM

Love it!!!!!!!!!

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 27, 2011
at 06:50 PM

Yup, totally agree. Petulant child carry becoming my specialty as of late (groan). They're so hard to hoist when they go boneless!

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on December 27, 2011
at 05:41 PM

Kids can be pricey as well. KBs are a one time cost.

B33f7c04c09d8bbbf181dd8aca04f373

(554)

on December 27, 2011
at 04:31 PM

+1 for toddler-lifting :) I have 2 and lifting them does wear out my arms

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 27, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Was just going to mention that!

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6 Answers

best answer

2
F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on December 27, 2011
at 05:33 PM

Ha ha! I believe Mark Sisson has an element in his workouts called "The Petulant Child Carry" and this would definitely count!

But as a straight-across substitute? Nah. Kettlebells and their handles allow certain ranges of motion and grips. In fact, strengthening other muscles will probably make carrying those toddlers easier.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 27, 2011
at 06:50 PM

Yup, totally agree. Petulant child carry becoming my specialty as of late (groan). They're so hard to hoist when they go boneless!

9
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 27, 2011
at 02:41 PM

Another benefit of using infants/toddlers to exercise is that their weight scales up as you get stronger.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on December 27, 2011
at 08:49 PM

I was marveling at that concept the other day, I used to think he was heavy when he was 6 months old and would have to either wear him in a carrier or put him down after a short while, but now I can walk home from the store a few blocks away carrying a squirming 2 year old with one arm and bags with the other.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 27, 2011
at 03:16 PM

Was just going to mention that!

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 28, 2011
at 03:38 AM

Reminds me of the (Greek?) wrestler whose strength was attributed to growing up with a calf who he carried up and down a hill every day of his life....till the day he was a man and the calf was a full grown cow he continued to do such. Probably just a little bit of BS in there, but I'm sure we could make it as far as the teen years as long as you dont feed em too much :)

5
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 27, 2011
at 12:44 PM

I've done some "toddler swings" with my niece; it wore me out! However, there's a lot you can do with a kettlebell that could be frowned upon if done with a toddler- turkish getups and snatches are a lot of fun, but you'll probably need a kettlebell for them. KBs can be pricey though; beware of buying a kettlebell you'll outgrow!

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on December 28, 2011
at 01:18 PM

True that! That's why I prefer kettlebells to babybells.

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on December 27, 2011
at 05:41 PM

Kids can be pricey as well. KBs are a one time cost.

3
D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on December 27, 2011
at 06:48 PM

Basic kettlebell swings - done properly with a high enough weight - work your hips, quads, and abs, possibly more than arms/shoulders. They're a great core workout, so a nicely heavy one for swings is a decent investment!

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on December 27, 2011
at 08:52 PM

I've been seriously lacking in the ab department since having the little guy, so I guess I need to either work on my form picking him up to engage the abs more, or go for the real metal kettlebell.

3
5dfa5673349ab7542a9c4b46a8883261

on December 27, 2011
at 12:52 PM

Made a video on the subject ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkEVt5_zLhQ&sns=em

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on December 27, 2011
at 08:46 PM

Love it!!!!!!!!!

2
6cdc6b1e75690cfcc4804a6c9eaa910a

(2171)

on December 27, 2011
at 12:58 PM

Kids are great for providing all the necessary exercise elements of a Paleo/primal lifestyle...lots of walking, occasional sprints to stop them walking into traffic, heavy lifting and of course play. However the normal child life-cycle does provide these in different measures between conception and them leaving home for University...

Before you know it, that toddler will be running everywhere and being picked up less (particularly if fed a good paleo diet, the toddler will be so full of energy...). So while then you may be getting more low level cardio from your child, the strength element may start to be lacking.

Then you will need to lift other heavy things. So unless you want to start producing your next toddler (not recommended just for the convenient strength training provided by "toddler swings"...) then kettlebells would be a great way to keep your guns and shoulders.

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