1

votes

Which factor is a major contributor to ketosis?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 19, 2012 at 12:06 PM

  1. Low blood glucose (no dietary carb intake and/or drug-inhibited gluconeogenesis)
  2. High FFA levels in blood (increased dietary intake of saturated fats and/or accelerated lipolysis of one's own fat)
  3. Increased rate of ketone body accumulation in blood (e.g. due to prolonged alcohol intake)
  4. Other factors?

Also for item 2, is there a difference between the types of fat (own or dietary) being used? Which type is the best for induction to ketosis?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 19, 2012
at 05:32 PM

Edit to add: Fasting also works.

7b4641bc7c610f2944da66f79cc3378a

(298)

on October 19, 2012
at 03:41 PM

JayJay, yes, that's also a good way to fast for a long period, but what if one has elevated levels of insulin and hepatic insulin resistance? As far as I know, this kind of IR may cause elevated gluconeogenesis thus preventing ketosis.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 19, 2012
at 03:37 PM

^Ahhhh....that's much easier to answer. Fast for 24 hours while performing glycogen depleting exercise. Boom, your in ketosis. Now all you have to do is acclimate to it.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on October 19, 2012
at 02:32 PM

I remembered this: http://www.ketotic.org/2012/08/we-were-talking-about-gluconeogenesis.html Which suggest excess protein may inhibit ketone production just by being there. But again, I did not find this to be a problem until after I lost weight. I did have a target amount of protein to eat every day-150g- probably too high and I often ate more than 20g per meal. I still lost weight at what, in retrospect, seems a pretty fast pace.

7b4641bc7c610f2944da66f79cc3378a

(298)

on October 19, 2012
at 01:21 PM

JayJay, I wanted to know which is the quickest way of entering ketosis.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 19, 2012
at 12:34 PM

I'm not sure I understand the question....except for the last bit. MCT's are most easily converted to ketones and used by the body.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

2
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 19, 2012
at 12:50 PM

I would say elevated levels of ketones in the blood are a major contributor to ketosis. Okay, all snarkiness aside, look up ketogenic diets on wiki. The classic keto diet (for epileptics) is about 5% CHO, 15% protein and the rest fat. Heavy cream is often used as a fat source, so much of it is saturated. This pretty much guarantees a very high level of ketones.

It is possible to get high levels of ketones using MCT oil at a higher CHO content and lower fat content (as per the wiki article).

And of course, there is alcoholic ketoacidosis.

Also, according to Paul Jaminet, using the ketogenic amino acids lysine and leucine can also lead to elevated ketone levels.

So, all four are correct.

Edit to add:

Fasting also works.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 19, 2012
at 05:32 PM

Edit to add: Fasting also works.

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on October 19, 2012
at 02:23 PM

The quickest way: No carbs. Keep protein at twenty grams per meal. Make up the rest of your calories with fat. MCT oil will help you start producing ketones right away.

For complete newbies dropping the carbs out usually just works. If you have plenty of fat stores, keeping insulin low most of the time and having some sort of calorie deficit seems to do the trick. I was able to have sweet (paleoish) treats every week and still lose weight. When those fat stores go away, though, gluconeogenesis and lack of energy becomes a problem. I wasn't getting hungry, but I was feeling rundown. It turns out you have to start adding the fat calories into your diet, and watch the protein because some of it is likely being turned into glucose, which in turn will lower ketone production.

The alcohol thing will get you dead. I've watched my blood sugar drop twenty points with two ounces of tequila. I also fainted once- could have easily gotten a concussion, or died alone on my bathroom floor, but I was lucky. At the time, I was sober and didn't think alcohol had anything to do with it; now I think the wine I had the night before combined with not enough calories the day before probably caused it. Hypoglycemics pass out, and if you look around here, you'll find a lot of us became a lot more sensitive to alcohol after going paleo.
And since most people are doing this to lose weight, well, alcohol isn't going to do you any favors there.

7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on October 19, 2012
at 02:32 PM

I remembered this: http://www.ketotic.org/2012/08/we-were-talking-about-gluconeogenesis.html Which suggest excess protein may inhibit ketone production just by being there. But again, I did not find this to be a problem until after I lost weight. I did have a target amount of protein to eat every day-150g- probably too high and I often ate more than 20g per meal. I still lost weight at what, in retrospect, seems a pretty fast pace.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!