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Long-Term Gluconeogenesis...Effects?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 19, 2012 at 10:57 PM

Hello All, I have been low carb (sub 50) for about a year or so on and off. I incorporate cheat meals with paleo high carb items casually (usually once every 2 weeks). I am highly active.

My question is this, I tend to do best with a VERY high protein diet (around 200g daily), probably because this allows my body to create ample glucose without actually ingesting starches or fruit (which cause bloating and tummy issues). Is this safe in the long term? I feel great on this type of diet, but was wondering if it was harder on my system having to create this. I guess it's not technically ketosis.

For those interested, I am of Native American descent. I say this because I fully believe in an ancestral diet.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on May 20, 2012
at 04:02 AM

I've always viewed it like putting diesel in a gas engine. It will run but not as efficient as it should. Why ingest so much protein if it is going to get converted to glucose anyways. On a per gram basis starches are cheaper, however in your case if starch and fruit are giving you problems and you've been doing it this way for a year with no problems, then why change it.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 20, 2012
at 02:17 AM

To summarize: long-term gluconeogenesis can work, but you will be operating on a consistently high level of cortisol, which may not be ideal.

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3 Answers

2
5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 20, 2012
at 02:16 AM

I've done exactly this for about 5 months. I generally felt great. However, I had a very stable routine and almost no stress in my life. I was very susceptible to slight increases in stress, at which point I would feel very sick for a day or two. I have since displaced a chunk of my protein intake with sugar.

I see no reason to force your body to convert protein into energy. By slightly reducing protein intake and slightly increasing sugar intake, you will likely reduce the burden on your kidneys, reduce baseline cortisol levels, and allow your body to entirely utilize your dietary protein for anabolic processes.

Furthermore, bloating on potatoes and fruit are likely caused by fiber or FODMAPs and not from the glucose or sucrose, as these are rapidly assimilated into the blood stream. As an experiment, try drinking some sugar water and see if that causes any bloating.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on May 20, 2012
at 02:17 AM

To summarize: long-term gluconeogenesis can work, but you will be operating on a consistently high level of cortisol, which may not be ideal.

1
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on May 19, 2012
at 11:27 PM

My first instinct is that the long-term safeness depends on how much other stress you have in your life. Low carb diet is a stress, as is exercise, as is 'life stress'. Some people may find thyroid issues (especially high RT3), trouble sleeping, cortisol issues, etc.

If you feel good eating this way I don't see why it would be a problem. Your body will let you know if something needs to be changed.

0
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on May 22, 2012
at 06:51 PM

Is gluconeogenesis really that stressing?

Richard Feinman says this on gluconeogenesis on a "regular" diet: "It is true that your brain needs glucose, but glucose can be supplied by the process of gluconeogenesis; that is, glucose can be made from other things, notably protein. This is a normal process: when you wake up in the morning, between thirty and seventy percent of your blood glucose comes from gluconeogenesis." http://www.diabeteshealth.com/read/2008/12/25/5383/low-carbohydrate-diets-why-you-dont-want-the-experts-to-tell-you-what-to-eat/

So we're all engaged in gluconeogenesis every day, if we eat a high protein diet or not. Of the 200g protein, at least 100g will be used for maintaining lean body tissue, leaving 100g for gluconeogenesis.

Protein is converted to glucose at 60%, so that's 60g of glucose or 240kcal, which you'll agree isn't very much.

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