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Ethanol and ketones

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 14, 2012 at 8:35 PM

When ethanol is metabolized, ketones are produced. Is it possible to use them as fuel during ketosis (or to enter state of ketosis)? If not, why? Biochemistry-based explanation would be very appreciated! Thanks!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 15, 2012
at 11:47 AM

Though most alcoholic drinks have a non-zero carbohydrate, unless you're drinking straight distilled spirits.

1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 15, 2012
at 06:48 AM

Thanks a lot for pointing out, I've updated the answer.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on October 14, 2012
at 10:43 PM

It didn't in this study on hypertensives: http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/20/2/219.full.pdf

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on October 14, 2012
at 10:33 PM

Evidence of that?

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 14, 2012
at 10:16 PM

Alcohol most definitely produces an insulin response.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on October 14, 2012
at 09:38 PM

Fatty acids are also made into Acetyl-CoA without producing ketones. You're leaving out what can happen to Acetyl-Coa after it's produced.

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2 Answers

2
1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 14, 2012
at 09:12 PM

Ethanol -> Acetaldehyde -> Acetic acid -> Acetyl-CoA -> Ketone bodies

The last step of conversion to ketone bodies would not necessarily hapen, especially if you're not low carb and have enough glucose at the time you drink the alcohol.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on October 14, 2012
at 09:38 PM

Fatty acids are also made into Acetyl-CoA without producing ketones. You're leaving out what can happen to Acetyl-Coa after it's produced.

1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 15, 2012
at 06:48 AM

Thanks a lot for pointing out, I've updated the answer.

1
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on October 14, 2012
at 09:33 PM

This is my understanding of things:

Ketones are produced from the acetyl-CoA during low insulin conditions. This occurs when some acetyl-Coa molecules, usually made from fatty acids (or sometimes specific amino acids), don't enter the Kreb's cycle like they normally would and instead are made into ketones.

Ethanol is turned into acetyl-Coa without producing an insulin response so it too can be converted into ketones similarly, but its effects go beyond this. Alcohol can depress Kreb's cycle activity, decrease liver glycogen, and promote hypoglycemia, all of which can increase ketones, sometimes to levels beyond what is normal during a typical ketogenic diet.

So it strikes me as potentially dangerous to use alcohol to increase ketones. You may get more than you bargained for.

"Effect of Ethanol on Ketone Metabolism"

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on October 14, 2012
at 10:43 PM

It didn't in this study on hypertensives: http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/20/2/219.full.pdf

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on October 14, 2012
at 10:33 PM

Evidence of that?

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 14, 2012
at 10:16 PM

Alcohol most definitely produces an insulin response.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 15, 2012
at 11:47 AM

Though most alcoholic drinks have a non-zero carbohydrate, unless you're drinking straight distilled spirits.

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