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A way to safely eat legumes?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 31, 2012 at 6:08 PM

I know they're complex carbohydrates so the body would metabolize it slowly just like we do with fats, but if you include them in your diet regularly, would the body prefer it over the fats you've eaten thus delaying the stages of ketogenesis during the day?

B7dc055712f63da44302972907fb1fad

(20)

on June 05, 2012
at 04:18 PM

I'm asking if that's the case.

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on June 02, 2012
at 10:54 PM

Why would anyone want to delay the stages of ketosis?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on June 01, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Indeed! I was pointing out that a plant simply being a legume is no reason not to eat it. My cut off line really is I it's digestible in raw form or not.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 10:03 PM

The study is linked in her blog. In orange text, second paragraph, "an experiment."

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:59 PM

Of course if you want to define paleo to be anything that lived anywhere on the earth during Paleolithic times so that a very hungry HG might have eaten them, deadly nightshade and digitalis are totally paleo.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:57 PM

Although if you create a new definition of paleo to be anything that lived anywhere on the earth during Paleolithic times, in which case deadly nightshade and digitalis are totally paleo.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:52 PM

They would have been pretty seasonal since we don't have evidence as far as I know of paleo's storing food. While some HGs certainly are semi settled, foraging out from seasonal sites, I haven't heard of much storage there either. In any case storage of grains and legumes under less than ideal conditions leads to some awful molds and mycotoxins. (see recent thread on Mycotoxins). In any case, people choose what to eat for themselves. You are quite welcome to eat all the legumes you want, but it still won't make them fit under the label of paleo.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:47 PM

It's not all about replication, it's about what's healthy or not. At least for me. Peanuts are native to South America, so if you want to go by replicating paleo you could say that humans did not evolve with frequent exposure to them or beans in the genus Phaseolus (most common beans). More likely, paleo people and HGs would eat something like peanuts (some other legumes were available) occasionally because starvation is even more undesirable than eating legumes. We also know that some paleo peeps ate some (probably not much and as starvation food) grains. Doesn't make them good for you.

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on May 31, 2012
at 08:50 PM

do you have a link to the studies you mention in your blog?

956bcad1d462d433a4e1e22f6e3355d5

(1191)

on May 31, 2012
at 07:33 PM

That thread doesn't really answer the question why a hunter-gatherer wouldn't cook and eat them. We know (by research) that they're bad but why wouldn't they eat peanuts like other nuts?

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 31, 2012
at 07:21 PM

But, uh, we don't eat the bean part of the jicama plant. It's a starchy root.

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3 Answers

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1
3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on May 31, 2012
at 07:01 PM

Lentils are the safest to eat, AFTER you ferment them. Research shows that most lectins are going away during fermentation. I wrote about how to ferment them here: http://eugenia.queru.com/2012/04/19/fermenting-lentils/

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 10:03 PM

The study is linked in her blog. In orange text, second paragraph, "an experiment."

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on May 31, 2012
at 08:50 PM

do you have a link to the studies you mention in your blog?

0
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 31, 2012
at 06:28 PM

There are plenty of legumes that I consume that I consider "paleo enough". The list includes snow peas, jicama, green beans, and others.

Some people focus on the phytates and lectins as the paleo-or-not marker. I think that's great if your a super strict paleo type. However, my general rule is "if you can eat it uncooked, it's paleo". Therefore, I do avoid dry beans and lentils.

I suppose I have my infrequent cheats, but eating jicama, for e.g., is not one of them.

If you're focusing on remaining in ketosis, you're going to want to avoid the dense carbohydrates in general, regardless of source.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on May 31, 2012
at 07:21 PM

But, uh, we don't eat the bean part of the jicama plant. It's a starchy root.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on June 01, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Indeed! I was pointing out that a plant simply being a legume is no reason not to eat it. My cut off line really is I it's digestible in raw form or not.

0
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 06:17 PM

Why are Legumes not Paleo? http://paleohacks.com/questions/11278/why-are-legumes-not-paleo#axzz1wT7EiHG0

Safest (a very relative term) is probably hulless lentils like masoor dal. You're not going to stay in ketosis eating any quantity of them though.

I love dal. It was one of the hardest things for me to give up, but eating legumes "regularly" is not going to do your body good. Try a month or two without any, then add them back in and find out the difference.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:57 PM

Although if you create a new definition of paleo to be anything that lived anywhere on the earth during Paleolithic times, in which case deadly nightshade and digitalis are totally paleo.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:52 PM

They would have been pretty seasonal since we don't have evidence as far as I know of paleo's storing food. While some HGs certainly are semi settled, foraging out from seasonal sites, I haven't heard of much storage there either. In any case storage of grains and legumes under less than ideal conditions leads to some awful molds and mycotoxins. (see recent thread on Mycotoxins). In any case, people choose what to eat for themselves. You are quite welcome to eat all the legumes you want, but it still won't make them fit under the label of paleo.

956bcad1d462d433a4e1e22f6e3355d5

(1191)

on May 31, 2012
at 07:33 PM

That thread doesn't really answer the question why a hunter-gatherer wouldn't cook and eat them. We know (by research) that they're bad but why wouldn't they eat peanuts like other nuts?

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:59 PM

Of course if you want to define paleo to be anything that lived anywhere on the earth during Paleolithic times so that a very hungry HG might have eaten them, deadly nightshade and digitalis are totally paleo.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on May 31, 2012
at 09:47 PM

It's not all about replication, it's about what's healthy or not. At least for me. Peanuts are native to South America, so if you want to go by replicating paleo you could say that humans did not evolve with frequent exposure to them or beans in the genus Phaseolus (most common beans). More likely, paleo people and HGs would eat something like peanuts (some other legumes were available) occasionally because starvation is even more undesirable than eating legumes. We also know that some paleo peeps ate some (probably not much and as starvation food) grains. Doesn't make them good for you.

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