1

votes

Raw Milk vs. Store bought Kefir for Probiotic Health ?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 11, 2013 at 2:32 PM

What is the relative probiotic quantity, quality and benefits (pro's & cons) between

Raw Milk

and

Store bought organic, grass fed kefir like: Lifeway's: http://www.lifeway.net/Products/OrganicKefir/WholeMilkKefir/OrganicWholeMilkWildberries.aspx

Thanks,

Mike

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on April 12, 2013
at 06:28 AM

Kefir bacteria are pretty good at killing competing bacteria, including pathogens, making raw milk safer. They can still grow, though, especially if the culture is weak. Heating milk to 145 for 30 minutes will kill any pathogens; boiling it isn't required.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on April 12, 2013
at 01:29 AM

great info, thanks! I am afraid of culturing bad bacteria that might be in the raw milk. I think that's why folks who make home made yogurt boil it first to kill everything, then add the desired good bacteria. Obviously, boiling raw milk would be a waste.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on April 11, 2013
at 10:11 PM

You have my sympathy for all the "raw milk kefir!" answers.

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3 Answers

best answer

2
5b9a25a1a676397a25579dfad59e1d7b

(2318)

on April 11, 2013
at 09:59 PM

My experience has led me to believe that kefir wins out over raw milk, at least for my stomach.

Kefir???s active yeast and bacteria provide more nutritive value by helping digest the foods that you eat and by keeping the colon environment clean and healthy. It has major strains of friendly bacteria; Lactobacillus Caucasus, Leuconostoc, Acetobacter species, and Streptococcus species.

It also contains beneficial yeasts, such as Saccharomyces kefir and Torula kefir, which dominate, control and eliminate destructive pathogenic yeasts in the body. They do so by penetrating the mucosal lining where unhealthy yeast and bacteria reside, forming a virtual SWAT team that housecleans and strengthens the intestines. Hence, the body becomes more efficient in resisting such pathogens as E. coli and intestinal parasites.

If you have Raw milk, you can try to make kefir with it for the best of both worlds. Raw milk generally works well with kefir grains. Raw milk comes with its own set of beneficial bacteria so if your milk is a few days old or wasn't chilled down quickly enough before you bought it, that bacterial count can be high. This means that the bacteria in the milk may provide some competition for the grains making it more difficult to culture the milk properly, so fresh is very important!

If you can make home made kefir with some local organic milk, or even better, raw milk, I think that would be the more beneficial of the two. Home made anything seems to always trump store bought any day :).

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on April 12, 2013
at 01:29 AM

great info, thanks! I am afraid of culturing bad bacteria that might be in the raw milk. I think that's why folks who make home made yogurt boil it first to kill everything, then add the desired good bacteria. Obviously, boiling raw milk would be a waste.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on April 12, 2013
at 06:28 AM

Kefir bacteria are pretty good at killing competing bacteria, including pathogens, making raw milk safer. They can still grow, though, especially if the culture is weak. Heating milk to 145 for 30 minutes will kill any pathogens; boiling it isn't required.

2
3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on April 11, 2013
at 04:27 PM

I vote for home made kefir (raw or not). Since its eating all the lactose, it probably produces more diverse species and a bigger count. Unfortunately, the store bought kefir has only 1/4 of the species and much smaller count than home made, since they don't want to sell it too tart, and they're using a chemical starter rather than real kefir grains. Personally, I'd go for home made goat kefir, I wouldn't trust raw easily, and I don't trust cow casein either (A1).

0
Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on April 12, 2013
at 06:39 AM

For probiotic activity, the Lifeway kefir. Milk on its own isn't probiotic.

I can't speak to the benefits of raw milk, for although I love it, I have gotten sick from it (campylobacter, during a small outbreak in Northern California a couple of years ago).

Commercial kefir isn't as diverse as Home made, but it's better than none at all. Lifeway also tastes good!

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