2

votes

Has anyone made fermented buckwheat pancakes?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 26, 2012 at 4:43 PM

I want to make some fermented buckwheat pancakes, but the recipes I find (e.g. in Nourishing Traditions) include wheat flour. Has anyone made fermented buckwheat pancakes successfully? And if so, could you give me some tips, please!

4147ff909047dad96c488821430a8731

(50)

on October 16, 2012
at 01:45 AM

canned puréed pumpkin is also an awesome addition, esp. when you don't have enough bananas around. If adding pumpkin I recommend adding a small amount of cloves, nutmeg and ginger (basically pumpkin pie spice combination) to the recipe, maybe 1/4 tsp each. Don't be afraid to taste the batter either!

4147ff909047dad96c488821430a8731

(50)

on September 24, 2012
at 11:53 PM

lately I've experimented with adding leftover mashed yam / sweet potato (cooked), tastes great. Also I've tried adding a bit of dextrose sweetener and that's pretty good too.

153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on June 26, 2012
at 07:37 PM

I'm pretty sure that just mixing buckwheat flour with kefir for example would work out fine, buckwheat holds together pretty well for something without gluten, mixing in an egg would make sure that it stays together during cooking.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 26, 2012
at 06:36 PM

I also follow Stephan's recipe. If you want fluffier pancakes rather than thin crepes, you could try Chris Kresser's (egads, another paleo expert) http://chriskresser.com/sourdough-buckwheat-pancakes-now-theyre-even-fluffier. They're nice because they take less time and involve yogurt in the fermentation step.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 26, 2012
at 06:29 PM

You could still use your flour. Just skip the initial sprouting phase and go right to the fermentation step. Just mix with enough water to make the pancake batter consistency and go from there.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 26, 2012
at 05:23 PM

lol .

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 26, 2012
at 05:22 PM

Buckwheat is paleo enough. Despite its name, it's not wheat.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 26, 2012
at 05:20 PM

Wonderful looking recipe - I have bookmarked it! I was looking for something really simple for a first trial run, hopefully just buckwheat soaked in water (or kefir) with salt - don't know if it would work, but this blini once looks amazing, if a little complicated to try for breakfast... Your recipe above looks more what I am aiming for initially, thanks!!

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 26, 2012
at 05:16 PM

Thanks for this - it looks really good and I shall try it at some point. But first I must use up the buckwheat flour which I bought on impulse!

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on June 26, 2012
at 04:48 PM

Is buckwheat paleo?

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8 Answers

5
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on June 26, 2012
at 05:03 PM

I am hoping I do not offend you by linking to a paleo expert's site but I have made this recipe from Stephan Guyenet and it's very good.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on June 26, 2012
at 05:23 PM

lol .

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 26, 2012
at 06:36 PM

I also follow Stephan's recipe. If you want fluffier pancakes rather than thin crepes, you could try Chris Kresser's (egads, another paleo expert) http://chriskresser.com/sourdough-buckwheat-pancakes-now-theyre-even-fluffier. They're nice because they take less time and involve yogurt in the fermentation step.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 26, 2012
at 05:16 PM

Thanks for this - it looks really good and I shall try it at some point. But first I must use up the buckwheat flour which I bought on impulse!

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 26, 2012
at 06:29 PM

You could still use your flour. Just skip the initial sprouting phase and go right to the fermentation step. Just mix with enough water to make the pancake batter consistency and go from there.

4
4147ff909047dad96c488821430a8731

on July 10, 2012
at 04:41 PM

I make a huge batch of fermeted buckwheat pancakes each week (about 40-50 pancakes), and the kids eat them for breakfast all week. Because they are fermented they keep amazingly well -- I once ate one that had been in the fridge for 2 weeks and it still tasted absolutely delicious!

has-anyone-made-fermented-buckwheat-pancakes?

I still have a sourdough starter left over from my bread-baking days (it was the sourdough that led me to Nourishing Traditions and from there to Paleo). If you don't have a sourdough starter just use a few tablespoons of yogurt or kefir to get the fermentation going.

Note: There's no sugar in the pancakes, but they taste delicious due to the mashed bananas, cinnamon and vanilla.

Here is my recipe (cut in half as you probably want to try a smaller amount your first time). The recipe was originally adapted from this wheat based one: Sourdough Pancakes.

Step 1 - ferment the flour (i.e. sourdough)

  • 50g sourdough starter, or 2 Tbsp plain yogurt or kefir
  • 350g warm water (85F)
  • 150g buckwheat flour
  • 200g white rice flour

In a large bowl, mix the starter or yogurt/kefir with the warm water until it dissolves. Then add the flours and mix until you get a batter. Cover and leave overnight to ferment in a warmish place. If your house is cold it may help to put a towel over the bowl.

The next morning you should notice that the batter has risen somewhat, maybe around 30% volume increase. It may have risen and then collapsed somewhat, that's fine as we're making pancakes, not bread.

Step 2 - make the pancakes

  • 3 to 4 (depending on size) mashed ripe bananas
  • 1/4 cup melted butter (or melted coconut oil)
  • 2 eggs ('egg replacer' works fine to substitute, in case of egg allergies)
  • water to adjust consistency

  • 1 Tbsp cinnamon (or more to taste)

  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder (note - contains corn starch; feel free to omit)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
  • pinch of stevia (optional - just makes it a little sweeter)

Preheat your pan or griddle.

Add the mashed bananas, butter, and eggs to the sourdough from the night before, and stir. If it seems too thick for pancake batter, you can add a bit of water now; if you're not sure wait until later. Mix the dry in ingredients in a small bowl and then add to the large bowl; I find a whisk works best for combining. You should notice the batter getting lighter and expanding slightly (there is a chemical reaction between the acid in the sourdough and the baking soda).

Ladle pancake batter onto your oiled pan/griddle. (I use bacon grease to oil the griddle, but butter or coconut oil, etc. are all good.) It should hiss nicely if it's warmed up properly. Flip after a minute or two; the cooked side should be a dark golden brown.

If the batter seems too thick, add small amounts of water to the bowl and stir. (I find I need to add water as I go; maybe the batter is thicker at the bottom?)

Serve with butter and fruit or maple syrup. Yogurt also makes a nice topping.

Leftovers will keep in the fridge at least a week. It's a good idea to let them dry out on a rack for several hours before moving to the fridge. Leftovers are great reheated in the toaster. You can add butter and cinnamon and treat them as 'toast', or just eat them as pancakes.

4147ff909047dad96c488821430a8731

(50)

on September 24, 2012
at 11:53 PM

lately I've experimented with adding leftover mashed yam / sweet potato (cooked), tastes great. Also I've tried adding a bit of dextrose sweetener and that's pretty good too.

4147ff909047dad96c488821430a8731

(50)

on October 16, 2012
at 01:45 AM

canned puréed pumpkin is also an awesome addition, esp. when you don't have enough bananas around. If adding pumpkin I recommend adding a small amount of cloves, nutmeg and ginger (basically pumpkin pie spice combination) to the recipe, maybe 1/4 tsp each. Don't be afraid to taste the batter either!

2
C8521a858edd480815a55f683afff86a

(2065)

on June 26, 2012
at 11:05 PM

Buckwheat cakes rule. My favorite way is simple:

Soak 1 cup buckwheat groats overnight in warm water with a squeeze of lemon juice or splash of apple cider vinegar.

Rinse very well and then add just enough fresh water to the groats to blend into a smooth consistency. I use a hand blender. At this point you can use the batter now or leave it out with salt added to ferment further. It ferments rapidly, especially in warm weather.

I use the ratio of one egg to one cup of batter, blend, add salt and whatever other seasoning and cook. They do work without an egg, but I prefer this texture. Good luck.

1
94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on August 13, 2012
at 05:04 PM

All the time. I made up my own recipe. It's part buckwheat, part almond flour. I have some tweaks for working with Bob's Red Mill to post but I suffer from limited bandwidth and haven't been able to upload it yet.

0
33a05a88478a9f81ccbbd03279f012c3

on May 16, 2014
at 09:56 AM

Buckwheat flour can sometimes taste funny when used in baking on it's own. Does this recipe work when mixed with other flours, like coconut flour, brown rice flour, corn flour, sorghum flour, teff flour, chestnut flour?? Can they ferment together with the buckwheat flour or is it better to add with the eggs after the buckwheat is fermented?

0
3d0093dd591d9b88db74d7bba970dea0

(222)

on August 13, 2012
at 03:38 PM

There is some debate about whether buckwheat will rise enough on its own to bake bread with it. Thoughts?

0
36ba71ea8bc4f736f4113433fde572bd

(347)

on June 26, 2012
at 06:20 PM

Here's my process. Same batter, but I will also make pancakes on a hot griddle with butter. I make one batch a week and eat about 3 pancakes/day with my breakfast.

Buckwheat Muffins

0
153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on June 26, 2012
at 04:48 PM

Sometimes I make them by just soaking the buckwheat groats, then pouring them into a mixer with some fermented milk, so that the mixture becomes even, and then letting it sour.

It keeps really well in the fridge, and you can just fry yourself some pancakes everyday from it.

Traditional buckwheat pancakes, blinis, are made from buckwheat flour, and traditionally no wheat is used, the recipe is simple, for example like this, this recipe is wheat free- http://glutenfreeday.com/?p=481

153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on June 26, 2012
at 07:37 PM

I'm pretty sure that just mixing buckwheat flour with kefir for example would work out fine, buckwheat holds together pretty well for something without gluten, mixing in an egg would make sure that it stays together during cooking.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 26, 2012
at 05:20 PM

Wonderful looking recipe - I have bookmarked it! I was looking for something really simple for a first trial run, hopefully just buckwheat soaked in water (or kefir) with salt - don't know if it would work, but this blini once looks amazing, if a little complicated to try for breakfast... Your recipe above looks more what I am aiming for initially, thanks!!

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