3

votes

Where do you get your k2?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 17, 2012 at 5:33 PM

For every increase of 10 micrograms in the amount of vitamin K2 consumed daily, the risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD) drops by 9 percent. This somewhat stunning statistic was noted as a result of a recent cohort study from the Netherlands evaluating the dietary vitamin K intakes of 16,057 post-menopausal women and their association with the incidence of CHD.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19179058

And

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11180916

Begin Edit

I also just found an article on k2 (mk-4) increasing testosterone significantly in rats. This could be pertinent in that testosterone influences skeletal developments. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21914161

End Edit

From the studies I found on google typing "d3 k2 bone mass" I find a bunch of studies all showing a 5-10% increase in BMD in <12 months (mostly in postmenopausal women) from combined d3 k2 consumption, being the most significant of the different methods they try.

Weston Price talked about k2 being some sort of activator before k2 was actually discovered and I believe he recommended high vitamin butter from rapidly growing green grass for this (in addition to his cod liver oil). He claimed this combination would be most effective because of the fat soluble vitamins working together (A,D and K2[though he called k2 activator X]). If elderly women can increase their bone mass at such an old age then I'd bet my bottom dollar it would help someone before their full bone mass has been developed (30 in men I think?).

Anyways my question stands, where do you get your vitamin k2 (not k1, there is a HUGE difference)? I've heard that goose liver and hard cheese are the best source for the mk-4 version of k2 and that natto is the best for the mk-7 version of k2, but I can't seem to find many sources that cite the k2 content of food much help and suggestions are appreciated.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 08, 2014
at 10:09 PM

I'd be happy to see some of those K2 and CHD studies. Clinical trials only though, please. Thanks.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:35 PM

Thank you, I ended up using Thorne drops, not these, but the ones that are exclusively k2 mk4 at 1mg per drop. This is the best option for me since I don't have access to high quality grass fed dairy/ caviar/ Blue Ice.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:34 PM

I ended up using Thorne drops, not these, but the ones that are exclusively k2 mk4 at 1mg per drop. Ty, this ended up being the best option for me since I don't have access to high quality grass fed dairy/ caviar/ Blue Ice.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 21, 2012
at 12:44 PM

I wish I had access to a farm like that, that sounds awesome!

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 21, 2012
at 12:43 PM

@Matt, There are numerous studies showing inverse correlations between k2 and cardiovascular heart disease and those same studies show 0 correlation between k1 intake and CHD. K1 is definitively a substandard form of k2 and I'd be happy to discuss any pertinent studies with you.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 19, 2012
at 05:13 PM

@Michelle, we're poor converters because the need is low (or the RDA is artificially low). K1, beta carotene and ALA can be converted to other forms, it's just simply not a 1-to-1 conversion. That doesn't mean they are substandard sources of nutrients.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on November 18, 2012
at 07:55 AM

Probably the list on Wikipedia, if I recall!

D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

(2029)

on November 18, 2012
at 05:32 AM

The K in leafy greens is K1, not K2. Like in the cases of Beta Carotene into Retinol and AHA into DHA, we need an external source to make the conversion for us because our bodies are really poor converters.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 17, 2012
at 08:09 PM

only has approximately 4% as much*

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 17, 2012
at 08:04 PM

Do you have any sources for the k2 content of chicken liver? The only one I can find is one the Weston Price site and it says that chicken liver only has only approximately 4% as much k2 as goose liver paste. I'm really curious about this since this seems to be the only source I've been able to find anywhere. http://www.westonaprice.org/fat-soluble-activators/x-factor-is-vitamin-k2#foods

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10 Answers

best answer

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:35 PM

Thank you, I ended up using Thorne drops, not these, but the ones that are exclusively k2 mk4 at 1mg per drop. This is the best option for me since I don't have access to high quality grass fed dairy/ caviar/ Blue Ice.

best answer

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:34 PM

I ended up using Thorne drops, not these, but the ones that are exclusively k2 mk4 at 1mg per drop. Ty, this ended up being the best option for me since I don't have access to high quality grass fed dairy/ caviar/ Blue Ice.

5
F26fbc92b18f4689769d6f8746ea40f7

(334)

on November 17, 2012
at 06:26 PM

Grass-fed butter!! It helps to live in New Zealand, where grass-fed products are the rule, not the exception :)!

4
D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

on November 18, 2012
at 05:48 AM

Grass fed butter and cheese, occasional local raw milk, cream, and kefir from grass fed Jersey cows (my dairy is also implementing a hydroponic system to provide fresh grass to their cows year-round. Nifty).

Ridiculous amounts of pastured egg yolks.

Liver (grass fed lamb and conventional chicken).

I have read that the body is especially good at storing and using as little K-2 you consume as efficiently as possible, so daily, large doses of K-2 may not be entirely necessary. But don't quote me on that. From the studies you cited, increased dosage may suggest a therapeutic benefit. But also note that 10 mcg is not that much if you don't avoid dairy and keep K-2 in mind when choosing the quality of your food.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 21, 2012
at 12:44 PM

I wish I had access to a farm like that, that sounds awesome!

2
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on November 17, 2012
at 05:40 PM

Chicken liver p??t?? and Gouda cheese are my sources. I eat both 3-4 x a week.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 17, 2012
at 08:09 PM

only has approximately 4% as much*

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on November 18, 2012
at 07:55 AM

Probably the list on Wikipedia, if I recall!

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 17, 2012
at 08:04 PM

Do you have any sources for the k2 content of chicken liver? The only one I can find is one the Weston Price site and it says that chicken liver only has only approximately 4% as much k2 as goose liver paste. I'm really curious about this since this seems to be the only source I've been able to find anywhere. http://www.westonaprice.org/fat-soluble-activators/x-factor-is-vitamin-k2#foods

0
4ea71b4625cb5df5b7b7a62c1560b2e1

(0)

on January 08, 2014
at 04:13 PM

Why don't you make your own natto using whatever you and the natto bacteria prefer? I buy navy beans by the 25 pound bag to make my natto, as well as making some garbanzo natto to make humus. While goose liver patte is a good source of K-2, having about 1/4 as much K-2 as natto, other livers are far, far, far lower in their K-2 content. Details on making natto at: http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nattosupport/info

/Jon

0
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on November 19, 2012
at 03:41 PM

From fish roe, lamb liver, tongues, lamb kidneys, and bone marrow. I have no idea how much i am getting. Its tough to find K2 data on real food ;)

0
531b053b68e92ac509fc1544f88dc103

(1205)

on November 19, 2012
at 01:54 PM

Because I have very low and stubborn HDL, I don't mess around trying and hoping to get K2 from food. I take Swanson's 100mcg vitamin K2: http://www.swansonvitamins.com/swanson-ultra-high-potency-natural-vitamin-k-2-menaquinone-7-from-natto-100-mcg-30-sgels

0
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on November 18, 2012
at 02:39 AM

I eat a big portion of leafy greens almost every day, usually kale or chard. Kale is the real staple because it is cheap and available year round. I wonder if grass-fed butter really has the full nutrition profile year round, it wouldn't seem so.

D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

(2029)

on November 18, 2012
at 05:32 AM

The K in leafy greens is K1, not K2. Like in the cases of Beta Carotene into Retinol and AHA into DHA, we need an external source to make the conversion for us because our bodies are really poor converters.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on November 19, 2012
at 05:13 PM

@Michelle, we're poor converters because the need is low (or the RDA is artificially low). K1, beta carotene and ALA can be converted to other forms, it's just simply not a 1-to-1 conversion. That doesn't mean they are substandard sources of nutrients.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on November 21, 2012
at 12:43 PM

@Matt, There are numerous studies showing inverse correlations between k2 and cardiovascular heart disease and those same studies show 0 correlation between k1 intake and CHD. K1 is definitively a substandard form of k2 and I'd be happy to discuss any pertinent studies with you.

0
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on November 18, 2012
at 12:30 AM

Cultured grass-fed butter. I also eat raw milk cheese every day, and I take the Green Pastures fermented cod liver oil + butter oil caps.

Before I started taking the Green Pastures caps, I did try the Thorne drops, but for some reason they made my skin papery and dry, which is the opposite of what they ought to do (at least as I understand it).

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