0

votes

cup measurement

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 23, 2012 at 7:01 AM

HI,

wHEN IT SAYS "1 CUP" WHAT IS THIS IN GRAMS?

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on August 23, 2012
at 05:58 PM

...and maybe we just solved the whole American obesity epidemic just there. You've been adding too many ingredients to your food people. When do I pick up my Nobel prize?

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on August 23, 2012
at 05:22 PM

It's close enough for most liquids and this is what we used when measuring volume in the pharmacy. Not necessary to be exact.

E7e57f3e3a156df4072ca85d463f8ed3

(358)

on August 23, 2012
at 04:51 PM

This only works for water, which has a density of 1.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 23, 2012
at 12:24 PM

borofergie, a cup is a standard measure. It's the volume that is equivalent to 1/2 lb of water. Everyone in the US has a cup measure in their home. Almost no one has a scale.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on August 23, 2012
at 11:02 AM

you're comparing volume (cups) to weight (grams). like apples to oranges.

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on August 23, 2012
at 10:40 AM

This is why I converted all my recipes to grams. It makes life much easier.

7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on August 23, 2012
at 08:19 AM

The American cup is a consistent measure. You can buy sets of 'cups' for baking. You can get plain stainless steel ones but I got these for christmas - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fred-Cup-Measuring-Matroyshkas-Cups/dp/B002L162FS/ref=pd_sim_kh_1

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on August 23, 2012
at 08:18 AM

So how'd you know about the wheat thing then? All sounds very suspicious to me.

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6 Answers

4
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 23, 2012
at 08:07 AM

As borofergie said, the answer to this actually depends on what you are measuring. For example:

  • 1 cup of water is 236 grams.

  • 1 cup of wheat flour (ewww) is about 130 grams.

  • 1 cup of butter (yum!) is 227 grams.

  • 1 cup of mercury (y'know, for all those recipes that call for mercury) is about 3200 grams.

So it varies. What will be filling your cup?

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on August 23, 2012
at 08:18 AM

So how'd you know about the wheat thing then? All sounds very suspicious to me.

2
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on August 23, 2012
at 08:02 AM

Depends on what is in the cup. 1 cup of feathers weighs a little less than a cup of uranium.

By the power of google: http://allrecipes.com/howto/cup-to-gram-conversions/

Why do American recipes do that? A cup is a measure of volume, not of weight, and not even a consistent one at that. I have big cups and small cups in my house. I'm thinking of buying y'all a set of kitchen scales for Christmas.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 23, 2012
at 12:24 PM

borofergie, a cup is a standard measure. It's the volume that is equivalent to 1/2 lb of water. Everyone in the US has a cup measure in their home. Almost no one has a scale.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on August 23, 2012
at 05:58 PM

...and maybe we just solved the whole American obesity epidemic just there. You've been adding too many ingredients to your food people. When do I pick up my Nobel prize?

7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on August 23, 2012
at 08:19 AM

The American cup is a consistent measure. You can buy sets of 'cups' for baking. You can get plain stainless steel ones but I got these for christmas - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fred-Cup-Measuring-Matroyshkas-Cups/dp/B002L162FS/ref=pd_sim_kh_1

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 23, 2012
at 12:22 PM

a cup is a measure of the liquid volume that would contain 1/2 pound of water (approx 236g water). Density of liquid would change how much weight would fit into the same volume. Also with non-liquids the use of a cup becomes silly.

American recipes use this because it has become a standard measure and ever household has one of these
.

A scale, on the other hand, very few people actually have (which I have never understood).

0
C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on August 23, 2012
at 03:37 PM

This reminds me of...

If a rooster was to lay an egg on top of a roof. Which direction will the egg fall?

0
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on August 23, 2012
at 01:07 PM

Weight (grams) is different than volume (cups). But here are some useful conversions:

1 teaspoon = 5 ml

1 cup = 240 ml

1 oz = 30 gm (in weight)

1 lb = 454 gm (in weight)

If you know how many teaspoons are in a tablespoon are in a cup, and so on, then if you have a calculator you can figure out any other calculations you need.

E7e57f3e3a156df4072ca85d463f8ed3

(358)

on August 23, 2012
at 04:51 PM

This only works for water, which has a density of 1.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on August 23, 2012
at 05:22 PM

It's close enough for most liquids and this is what we used when measuring volume in the pharmacy. Not necessary to be exact.

0
45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on August 23, 2012
at 12:49 PM

I love my scale and use it a lot, but, yes, I grew up in the US using cups. And as everyone has said, it depends on what you're weighing.

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