4

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Gastroparesis and Paleo diet

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 16, 2011 at 4:44 AM

I have moderate Gastroparesis (6 yrs. no cure in sight) meaning I have to eat 6 small meals day avoiding fat, fiber and sugar. On top of it I cannot tolerate much dairy, only plain Greek yogurt and no red meat at all. I am interested in eating Paleo because I used to love and still do love eating fresh local produce...only I get very ill from it. Also there are 1 or 2 days a week I cannot tolerate any solid foods. I do well with liquids, does Paleo work with juicing? It seems a lot of soluble fiber is lost I'm it, which is good for me. But will I still get the nutrients? And is almond milk ok? I would like to have an option for a smoothie type drink. I would appreciate anyone with insight into how Paleo and low residue/ low fiber/gastroparesis diets work together and recipes. Thanks!

11eb5da2d07d1ade9f37c649b7df781f

(0)

on March 11, 2014
at 03:23 AM

Hi Kari 1, Can you tell me how you're doing now with your Lyme treatments and gastroparesis? I have exactly the same thing and it's a nightmare trying to find something to help. Any advice is appreciated!

11eb5da2d07d1ade9f37c649b7df781f

(0)

on March 11, 2014
at 03:22 AM

namaste1122@gmail.com

Medium avatar

on November 19, 2011
at 07:17 AM

Thanks for your insight. I assumed that since vagus nerve stimulation has been shown to help with depression and some other things it could help with gastroparesis. After doing some more research I think you're right in that it only helps with nausea and not actually stimulating the vagus nerve to increase gastric motility. The wikipedia page says a new product is coming out in 2012 that stimulates the vagus nerve without needing to be implanted, what do you make of that? I don't know if it's possible to help digestive problems with this, I'm just thinking in theory maybe it could help.

Medium avatar

on November 16, 2011
at 07:31 PM

If money isn't a problem for you, you can actually have a vagal nerve stimulator implanted in you that stimulates the vagus nerve and allows it to regain its function http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vagus_nerve_stimulation. A properly functioning vagus nerve is a key to digestion since it controls stomach emptying, influences the immune system, and controls excess inflammation. Without it, the lines of communication between your brain and gut are cut and everything goes haywire.

Medium avatar

on November 16, 2011
at 07:21 PM

Well that explains it. I read that certain infections can cause damage to the vagus nerve, which then leads to gastroparesis. Fermented foods are very healthy, tasty, and easy to digest. They're made by just taking whatever food you wanna eat, say veggies, adding good bacteria to it (what they call a starter culture or kefir grains) and letting them grow, or ferment. It's an acquired taste but over time you'll get used to it and most people love it. Some examples are kimchi, sauerkraut, cocunut kefir, etc.

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8 Answers

3
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on November 16, 2011
at 05:23 AM

I only had idiopathic gastroparesis for about a year. I stopped following the conventional recs pretty quickly and started a paleo diet high in fat. But every case of gastroparesis is different. What worked for me is a zero carb diet of mainly raw ground meat and fish and I slowly added in other foods. I ate lots of acid (kombucha or ACV) when I felt indigestion because my gastroparesis had coincided with a serious bout of salmonella after taking a lot of acid-suppressing GERD medication. Slowly I added in normal foods one at a time, starting with fruit smoothies (with NO fat, I found fat + fruit slowed emptying down) and lacto-fermented veggies. Now my doc tells me I don't have it anymore, which is great.

I think if I had known at the time, I would have drank a lot of bone broths.

But if you can't get solid food to work, you probably need to stick with the foods your doctor prescribed because you aren't going to get complete nutrition from things like juice or almond milk. Or ask your doctor if their is a supplement you can take to make a broth + juice + nut milk diet complete.

WAPF has an article about it too http://www.westonaprice.org/ask-the-doctor/gastroparesis

2
67fa7ea8a3bc7220bc328462f21cdae6

on November 19, 2011
at 04:00 AM

A common misconception, the vagus nerve stimulator (Enterra) does NOT restore the signal nor restore gastric motility; it blocks a portion of the pathway with electrical noise to block some of the nausea signal from reaching the brain. A similar device has been clinically studied to TRY to restore some gastric waves, however is limited to mere days due to the abundance of battery power needed. That device has an external battery pack, if that gives you an idea. It is a high energy-low frequency method and has been limited to this day by lack of increase in battery technology. How do I know all this? I have the Enterra neurostimulator for gastroparesis and have studied all available methods extensively, as well as being treated by one of the best GP docs in the country for this condition.

Medium avatar

on November 19, 2011
at 07:17 AM

Thanks for your insight. I assumed that since vagus nerve stimulation has been shown to help with depression and some other things it could help with gastroparesis. After doing some more research I think you're right in that it only helps with nausea and not actually stimulating the vagus nerve to increase gastric motility. The wikipedia page says a new product is coming out in 2012 that stimulates the vagus nerve without needing to be implanted, what do you make of that? I don't know if it's possible to help digestive problems with this, I'm just thinking in theory maybe it could help.

2
Medium avatar

on November 16, 2011
at 06:04 AM

I've had similar problems as you've described. Have you tried eating significant amounts of fermented foods? You may have bacterial dysbiosis so getting a steady source of good bacteria will help with that if you do. As this paper states, there's some overlap between SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth) and gastroparesis. I believe the SIBO may indirectly cause gastroparesis, and here's why: gastroparesis can be caused by having a malfunctioning vagus nerve, which controls stomach emptying and connects the brain to the gut. I recently found out that if you have chronic inflammation from the gut (caused by SIBO) it travels to the brain and can disrupt the brain's signal to the vagus nerve, causing it to be underactive. This will affect the rate at which the stomach empties. As for a smoothie type drink, the perfect thing is kefir. I drink goat's milk kefir or coconut milk kefir, both taste great and are very easy to digest while providing lots of nutrients and good bacteria. This podcast may give you insight into problems with the gut-brain axis and how to treat it when it's messed up http://chriskresser.com/the-healthy-skeptic-podcast-episode-9.

1
44a3c38c71df57431390c5ce49de5339

(115)

on November 16, 2011
at 01:05 PM

I have GP also. After years of experimenting, I eat a high fat meat (zero carb diet) with occasional (cooked) vegs or fruits when tolerated. Eating meat with the SAD high carb diet was my worst nightmare. After years of suffering with GP, I tried the opposite approach. With zero carb, high fat, all the GP symptoms completely disappeared.

1
20728624e1e13817fbac4e2e5249fb3a

on November 16, 2011
at 05:15 AM

I have gastroparesis as well and recently was diagnosed with Lyme disease - I see both an amazing integrative doctor and naturopath and am feeling confident that once I've cleared the lyme, my digestion will come back online.

Here is an article with more details: http://www.practicalgastro.com/pdf/April06/SherrArticle.pdf

11eb5da2d07d1ade9f37c649b7df781f

(0)

on March 11, 2014
at 03:22 AM

namaste1122@gmail.com

11eb5da2d07d1ade9f37c649b7df781f

(0)

on March 11, 2014
at 03:23 AM

Hi Kari 1, Can you tell me how you're doing now with your Lyme treatments and gastroparesis? I have exactly the same thing and it's a nightmare trying to find something to help. Any advice is appreciated!

0
11eb5da2d07d1ade9f37c649b7df781f

on March 11, 2014
at 03:22 AM

Hi Kari 1, Can you tell me how you're doing now with your Lyme treatments and gastroparesis? I have exactly the same thing and it's a nightmare trying to find something to help. Any advice is appreciated!

0
2c3e77c518204ecb2dff606d48c2d170

(30)

on November 16, 2011
at 06:11 PM

Thanks for the information I will look into the kefir - that might be a nice change from the greek yogurt all the time. As for the cause - my vagus nearve does not function due to a serious bout with Giardia that seriously distrupted by GI tract about 6 years ago (I didn't eat anything but chicken broth and saltines for 3 months while on major antibiotics). I will keep up with the chicken and veggie broth. What are fermented foods? sounds scary - I tried Kombucha, but I couldn't handle the taste! I will also try the coconut milk / water I have heard a lot of people around the gym talk about it like it is liquid gold.

Medium avatar

on November 16, 2011
at 07:21 PM

Well that explains it. I read that certain infections can cause damage to the vagus nerve, which then leads to gastroparesis. Fermented foods are very healthy, tasty, and easy to digest. They're made by just taking whatever food you wanna eat, say veggies, adding good bacteria to it (what they call a starter culture or kefir grains) and letting them grow, or ferment. It's an acquired taste but over time you'll get used to it and most people love it. Some examples are kimchi, sauerkraut, cocunut kefir, etc.

Medium avatar

on November 16, 2011
at 07:31 PM

If money isn't a problem for you, you can actually have a vagal nerve stimulator implanted in you that stimulates the vagus nerve and allows it to regain its function http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vagus_nerve_stimulation. A properly functioning vagus nerve is a key to digestion since it controls stomach emptying, influences the immune system, and controls excess inflammation. Without it, the lines of communication between your brain and gut are cut and everything goes haywire.

0
B1274098b96c7da91b325c585ebdd038

on November 16, 2011
at 05:52 AM

Twinlab Betaine Hcl with Pepsin. I am a total believer of this over the counter med after having also been diagnosed gastroparesis trying to live with meats fats in my diet. Best of luck to you.

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