8

votes

Shelf Stable Homemade Paleo Canned Goods

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 26, 2012 at 10:16 PM

For Christmas this year, I am going to be putting together little gift boxes full of Paleo treats as a sneaky way to get my friends and family to get on board. I'm planning on making a Paleo ketchup with the tomatoes from my garden, a couple different types of cookies, and dried spices from my garden. I want to make shelf stable marinara, pesto, and jam, also, but I don't know how long they would be shelf stable or what I would have to do to ensure they don't spoil. Does anyone have experience making shelf stable Paleo canned goods? I would love any suggestions!!

20aee218ca5bce816122348144db9792

(122)

on August 01, 2012
at 09:08 AM

How will those things ship, though?

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on July 28, 2012
at 07:09 PM

@Lena, I can honestly say in 35 years of pressure canning that I've never had those issues. Are you, by any chance, at a higher altitude? (2000-3000 ft above sea level?)

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 28, 2012
at 12:25 AM

@Firestorm: I didn't see where the OP had a pressure canner. If one didn't want to buy one, water bath is a safe option. I'm pretty sure most canning-related illness results from careless methods. Done properly, botulism shouldn't result. I get tired of the fear-mongering around food preservation, which mainly serves to prevent people from trying it, and relying on mega-food corporations to handle all our processing.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 28, 2012
at 12:22 AM

@AshleyRoz: Easy enough to google for sources. But thanks for alerting me to this, I didn't even know citric acid was GMO-produced.

F40555b9be81e12c2fc460e6fa7d097c

(692)

on July 27, 2012
at 09:09 PM

I honestly hate my pressure canner. I've followed the directions to a T and the damn things run over and just never seal properly.

2a00b9a42e4cb6e489a0e69d20714576

(3043)

on July 27, 2012
at 04:32 PM

Bubbies makes a great saukeraut (no vinegar) and gluten free to boot!

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on July 27, 2012
at 01:39 PM

Yes, you CAN water-bath can them, but even with the addition of acid, you still increase the risk of contamination. There are a not-insignificant number of cases of botulism every year from home-canned tomatoes that were not pressure-canned. And if you have a pressure canner already, to can everything else, and it takes less time and less work, it makes good sense just to use the safer method, don't you think?

20aee218ca5bce816122348144db9792

(122)

on July 27, 2012
at 01:29 PM

Surely there are organic lemons available near you?

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 27, 2012
at 01:11 PM

Check out http://www.nourishingtreasures.com/index.php/2012/07/03/sauerkraut-survivor-final-report/ for all the Sauerkraut info you need!

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on July 27, 2012
at 12:07 PM

Where do you find non-gmo citric acid?

20aee218ca5bce816122348144db9792

(122)

on July 27, 2012
at 01:37 AM

Lactofermented like sauerkraut? I've always wanted to try eating and making that. Any suggestions?

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 26, 2012
at 11:23 PM

You do not need a pressure canner for tomatoes. I've canned them myself with just a hot water bath method. You just need to add some acid in the form of citric acid, lemon juice, or vinegar, and there's nothing wrong with that--they taste fine. I prefer citric acid because it adds no flavor. However, you are right about everything else.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on July 26, 2012
at 11:07 PM

ah! ok, sorry, i thought it was called preserving food.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on July 26, 2012
at 11:06 PM

Preserving foods in glass is not called canning

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on July 26, 2012
at 11:05 PM

@Alvaro - even though they call it canning, when it is done at home jars are used. I do a lot of canning myself.

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on July 26, 2012
at 11:03 PM

Um... I can foods all the time! It means that I'll have foods from my garden available all winter long, and canning has a LONG history with humans, though early 'canning' used to be fat-immersed foods that were then wrapped and smoked (to reduce rancidity). These days, a pressure canner allows for glass-jar canning of just about anything you can imagine, including meats!

Medium avatar

(3213)

on July 26, 2012
at 10:59 PM

Doesn't deserve a downvote though

Medium avatar

(3213)

on July 26, 2012
at 10:59 PM

The words Paleo and canned, shouldn't be in the same sentence. And how do you plan on canning food, do you own a canning factory?

A31b063c5866c08aa9968a8f2f1e9949

(1721)

on July 26, 2012
at 10:58 PM

Don't understand the downvote either... sorry I can't help you, but it's an interesting question. Looking forward to seeing the answers.

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on July 26, 2012
at 10:57 PM

I have no idea why you got downvoted. I would upvote you for this question, but I've just run out votes.

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4 Answers

5
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 27, 2012
at 12:53 AM

I would stay away from canning pesto or anything with oil, due to the high botulism risk. Also, properly lactofermented foods will stay good for a while.

20aee218ca5bce816122348144db9792

(122)

on July 27, 2012
at 01:37 AM

Lactofermented like sauerkraut? I've always wanted to try eating and making that. Any suggestions?

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 27, 2012
at 01:11 PM

Check out http://www.nourishingtreasures.com/index.php/2012/07/03/sauerkraut-survivor-final-report/ for all the Sauerkraut info you need!

2a00b9a42e4cb6e489a0e69d20714576

(3043)

on July 27, 2012
at 04:32 PM

Bubbies makes a great saukeraut (no vinegar) and gluten free to boot!

2
Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on July 27, 2012
at 03:55 AM

I support you in learning to can food, it's a great hobby and way to preserve the harvest. I have been on both the giving and recieving end of various homemade canned goods, and I know from experience that these often go unused. Whether its because the item is an unfamiliar food, lacks a bright shiny label when you go in the cupboard to make dinner, or even the fact that some people are suspicious of home canned goods and fear food poisoning (esp botulism) they tend to sit around until they really are to old to be good anymore. Yes, there are exceptions to this, my mother in law loves my pickled beets and I enjoy my sister in law's salsas, but in my experience any kind of food gift- jerky, nuts, cookies etc will be consumed and enjoyed- whereas canned goods tend to sit around. My mom is actually scared of home canned food, and sadly she is not alone in this. Canning is fun and creative but it also involves a big expenditure of time, energy and an up front investment in equipment. Not to be a Debbie downer, just what I've noticed over time. If you do make things to share with others, it's important to clearly lable them with all the ingredients. I once opened a jar or relish I got in a local canned good swap to find it was syrupy sweet and full of my enemy, the only vegtable I will not eat, green peppers. Labels will help make canned goods less mysterious and up the probability that they get eaten. I highly reccomend getting the Ball Blue Book and taking a class from your local co-operative extension when getting started. Good luck!

2
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on July 26, 2012
at 11:11 PM

To can low-acid foods, including tomatoes, you will need to invest in a pressure canner. Personally, I like the canners at Lehman's Non-Electric. They're amazingly high quality and even though they seem expensive, they'll last you DECADES!

For canning high-acid foods (many fruits, etc.), you can use a water-bath canner, but in my experience, it's a waste of time if you have a pressure canner. Everything cans better in a pressure canner, and the process is shortened substantially using a pressure canner, so I just use mine for EVERYTHING!

Then, you'll need canning jars. Quart jars work well for broth, meats, and marinara sauce, etc. Pint jars are nice for things like ketchup, as are half-pint/jelly jars. You can pick them up in a LOT of places.

You'll also need a good "canning bible". I strongly recommend the "Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving"; "Homestead Blessings: The Art of Canning"; "The Home Preserving Bible"; and several sections of "Nourishing Traditions".

There are some other tools that are really helpful -- a good ladle, wooden spoons, "bubbling spatulas", a good cooking thermometer and candy thermometer, good hot-pads, a cooling rack... but you'll learn about THOSE in the canning books.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on July 27, 2012
at 12:07 PM

Where do you find non-gmo citric acid?

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 28, 2012
at 12:22 AM

@AshleyRoz: Easy enough to google for sources. But thanks for alerting me to this, I didn't even know citric acid was GMO-produced.

F40555b9be81e12c2fc460e6fa7d097c

(692)

on July 27, 2012
at 09:09 PM

I honestly hate my pressure canner. I've followed the directions to a T and the damn things run over and just never seal properly.

20aee218ca5bce816122348144db9792

(122)

on July 27, 2012
at 01:29 PM

Surely there are organic lemons available near you?

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 26, 2012
at 11:23 PM

You do not need a pressure canner for tomatoes. I've canned them myself with just a hot water bath method. You just need to add some acid in the form of citric acid, lemon juice, or vinegar, and there's nothing wrong with that--they taste fine. I prefer citric acid because it adds no flavor. However, you are right about everything else.

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on July 27, 2012
at 01:39 PM

Yes, you CAN water-bath can them, but even with the addition of acid, you still increase the risk of contamination. There are a not-insignificant number of cases of botulism every year from home-canned tomatoes that were not pressure-canned. And if you have a pressure canner already, to can everything else, and it takes less time and less work, it makes good sense just to use the safer method, don't you think?

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on July 28, 2012
at 07:09 PM

@Lena, I can honestly say in 35 years of pressure canning that I've never had those issues. Are you, by any chance, at a higher altitude? (2000-3000 ft above sea level?)

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 28, 2012
at 12:25 AM

@Firestorm: I didn't see where the OP had a pressure canner. If one didn't want to buy one, water bath is a safe option. I'm pretty sure most canning-related illness results from careless methods. Done properly, botulism shouldn't result. I get tired of the fear-mongering around food preservation, which mainly serves to prevent people from trying it, and relying on mega-food corporations to handle all our processing.

0
0408fb6c082971b0559503b77eb9483c

on July 27, 2012
at 08:18 PM

There are other methods than canning, it would be worth perusing a copy of

Preserving Food without Freezing or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, and Lactic Fermentation

we use certain types of preserving presented in the book quite often.

Additionally, we use a lot of drying.

We do can a fair amount, but generally limit the high sugar canning segments. We try to balance the amount that is canned as we have a certain amount of "rawism" in our peculiar paleo variant!

20aee218ca5bce816122348144db9792

(122)

on August 01, 2012
at 09:08 AM

How will those things ship, though?

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