3

votes

is eating oysters paleo/favorable/healthy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 10, 2011 at 2:51 PM

i just moved to san francisco and there is an abundance of fresh oysters. are they healthy? how frequently can i eat them?

1daf80d74054f22505794c370d6a1aee

(0)

on January 25, 2012
at 01:18 AM

Tried them as you suggested (rolled in coconut flour and pan-fried) - with a drizzle of fresh lemon = perfect!! Simple and so delicious! Thanks!

95c2219003f2a74c5f5a74feac603172

(100)

on February 11, 2011
at 09:20 PM

That sounds like a positively decadent recipe. YUM!

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 11, 2011
at 06:55 PM

I am about to perish with envy!

Medium avatar

(12379)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:38 PM

ya - raw is great also! I think the smaller oysters (like the kumamotos or kusshis) are excellent raw and the larger oysters (like the fanny bay's) are yummier cooked - but thats just my personal opinion. I think if you've got lots of oysters to work with the more recipes the better!

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:34 PM

I eat them both raw and cooked. Different flavor/texture each way. In fact, your post inspired me to order a half dozen kumamotos on the half shell to go with my sashimi at my favorite sushi bar last night! :)

37730f18e028cdda4d4386e31d3d30f3

(88)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:49 AM

cynarin, raw or cooked?

37730f18e028cdda4d4386e31d3d30f3

(88)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:49 AM

ricehck, thanks for the feedback, but is it ok to eat it raw?

37730f18e028cdda4d4386e31d3d30f3

(88)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:49 AM

bree, thanks for the feedback, but is it ok to eat it raw?

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on February 10, 2011
at 05:45 PM

I would slurp oysters every day if I could!

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on February 10, 2011
at 05:00 PM

OK, Bree...that just sounds too yummy! I'm adding that to my paleo recipe list right now!!

  • 37730f18e028cdda4d4386e31d3d30f3

    asked by

    (88)
  • Views
    6.4K
  • Last Activity
    1279D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

best answer

4
Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

on February 10, 2011
at 04:20 PM

I'd imagine oysters would be on Grok's menu, for sure! They're easy prey to catch/gather, very tasty, and have very high levels of iodine and zinc.

If I had my way, I'd be eating 1-2 dozen daily with a touch of freshly grated horseradish (go tubers!) and a dash of Crystal hot sauce (go New Orleans!). Unfortunately, the cost of fresh oysters places them in the "occasional indulgence" category. :)

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:34 PM

I eat them both raw and cooked. Different flavor/texture each way. In fact, your post inspired me to order a half dozen kumamotos on the half shell to go with my sashimi at my favorite sushi bar last night! :)

37730f18e028cdda4d4386e31d3d30f3

(88)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:49 AM

ricehck, thanks for the feedback, but is it ok to eat it raw?

6
Medium avatar

(12379)

on February 10, 2011
at 04:52 PM

Mmmmm lucky you! I would definitely throw them into your diet at least once a week or more. I recently cooked oysters dipped in eggs and rolled in coconut flour and pan fried in a hot pan with coconut oil then served with a roasted beet and fresh horseradish salad - YUMMY!!!

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on February 10, 2011
at 05:00 PM

OK, Bree...that just sounds too yummy! I'm adding that to my paleo recipe list right now!!

37730f18e028cdda4d4386e31d3d30f3

(88)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:49 AM

bree, thanks for the feedback, but is it ok to eat it raw?

95c2219003f2a74c5f5a74feac603172

(100)

on February 11, 2011
at 09:20 PM

That sounds like a positively decadent recipe. YUM!

Medium avatar

(12379)

on February 11, 2011
at 03:38 PM

ya - raw is great also! I think the smaller oysters (like the kumamotos or kusshis) are excellent raw and the larger oysters (like the fanny bay's) are yummier cooked - but thats just my personal opinion. I think if you've got lots of oysters to work with the more recipes the better!

1daf80d74054f22505794c370d6a1aee

(0)

on January 25, 2012
at 01:18 AM

Tried them as you suggested (rolled in coconut flour and pan-fried) - with a drizzle of fresh lemon = perfect!! Simple and so delicious! Thanks!

3
Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on February 10, 2011
at 05:20 PM

oysters are the greatest- all bivalves are my friend! we have an abundance of fresh clams and muscles (but especially clams) where i am, and they were a staple of the indigenous tribes here for thousands of years. B12, zinc, iron! go for it, and enjoy- they are my FAVORITE.

2
Fe6e37f8d4c49de1ecbc926c8900cd54

on February 10, 2011
at 04:19 PM

I can't think of a reason that oysters wouldn't be paleo/healthy. Also, they're an awesome source of B12--something a lot of people have trouble getting enough of. Enjoy the bounty!

1
E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on February 11, 2011
at 03:57 AM

There were a lot of reasons that our ancestors tended to live near water when they could, and not just for the water itself, and stable, easy to catch bivalves were very likely one of those many reasons. They are good sources of proteins and trace minerals. I don't eat the raw ones, but many do, and there are old "rules" about how to do so which you can find on the web if you're into that. I prefer them cooked, and generally, they are only unsafe if the shells don't open during cooking. The way I understand it, because of the way their muscles are structured (the organism's muscles have to expand and contract to open or close the shells) and how they open and close the shells, if they don't open upon cooking, they've been dead for too long to eat.

0
5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on February 11, 2011
at 06:56 AM

The only down-side might be what was in the water they were raised in. They're filter-feeders so they can get whatever's in the water. According to Seafood Watch, farmed oysters account for 95 percent of the world’s total oyster consumption. However, unlike fish farming, oysters don't seem to require a feed input like soy and fishmeal and other "by-products" - they get what they need from the sea water. You're probably good to go if you trust the source.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!