2

votes

cast iron skillet? enamel coated?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 20, 2012 at 3:55 AM

i'm looking into getting a skillet....i only getting one so I am willing to spend more to get one that's good quality....i found this one on amazon: Lodge Enameled Cast-Iron 11-Inch Skillet....i know its not top of the line, but from my understanding enameled means you don't have to season it? any advice and recommendations would be much appreciated...my main concern is iron leaching into my food....thanks

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 20, 2012
at 07:15 PM

I agree re: acidic foods. I use the enameled one for soups with tomatoes, for instance. I don't like cooking acidic food in a seasoned cast iron skillet because it causes the seasoning to deteriorate.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 20, 2012
at 07:12 PM

Be careful: I purchased a beautiful Lodge enameled dutch oven, and chose the brand because it was made in the USA. So imagine my disappointment when the package arrived, and it was made in China. Lodge apparently licenses some of their stuff overseas, and does not necessarily disclose this, at least not on Amazon, etc.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 20, 2012
at 07:10 PM

"Lodge enameled cast iron skillet" is not pre-seasoned, or seasoned. It's enameled. You can tell, on account of it's called "enameled" in the name. I know--I are a genius!

785efa3950951957e65fa17efb25b078

(452)

on August 20, 2012
at 02:39 PM

Yeah, seasoning is something you build up over time.

A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

(2053)

on August 20, 2012
at 01:33 PM

Alex - This is an awesome idea. I love my Lodge, but I think I will love it more after I give it your treatment. Thanks for posting this.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 20, 2012
at 01:09 PM

I use porcelained steel for sauteeing. There is sticking and discoloration, but the pans clean easily with soaking. The nice thing about porcelain is the smoothness. Your grinding of the Lodge's rough cast surface gets the same effect.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 20, 2012
at 11:41 AM

and don't confuse pre-seasoned as seasoned. Pre-seasoned pans are almost never done right -- even with a good brand like lodge. Season it yourself, it's easy! http://www.southernplate.com/2009/02/how-to-season-a-cast-iron-skillet.html

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8 Answers

4
Cf416725f639ffd1bb90764792ce7b8a

(2799)

on August 20, 2012
at 04:15 AM

Don't confuse enameled and pre-seasoned.

http://www.lodgemfg.com/Seasoned.asp

And you can always get the old school lodge cheap at walmart and season it yourself.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 20, 2012
at 11:41 AM

and don't confuse pre-seasoned as seasoned. Pre-seasoned pans are almost never done right -- even with a good brand like lodge. Season it yourself, it's easy! http://www.southernplate.com/2009/02/how-to-season-a-cast-iron-skillet.html

785efa3950951957e65fa17efb25b078

(452)

on August 20, 2012
at 02:39 PM

Yeah, seasoning is something you build up over time.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 20, 2012
at 07:10 PM

"Lodge enameled cast iron skillet" is not pre-seasoned, or seasoned. It's enameled. You can tell, on account of it's called "enameled" in the name. I know--I are a genius!

3
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on August 20, 2012
at 12:01 PM

My experience with enamel cookware is that food sticks to it like crazy. To me, the biggest benefit of cast iron is that it is non-stick when seasoned properly, and it makes zero sense to me that they'd take a cast iron skillet and coat it with something that is the exact opposite of non-stick. Enamel is fine for soups and stews, but for frying and sauteing, it's terrible.

As for Lodge pans, my peeve with them is the pebbled texture. Classic cast iron skillets were machined smooth. Recently, I used an angle grinder with flap disks and an orbital sander to polish one of my Lodge pans as smooth as glass. I then used the flax oil seasoning method, and I am absolutely delighted with it.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on August 20, 2012
at 01:09 PM

I use porcelained steel for sauteeing. There is sticking and discoloration, but the pans clean easily with soaking. The nice thing about porcelain is the smoothness. Your grinding of the Lodge's rough cast surface gets the same effect.

A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

(2053)

on August 20, 2012
at 01:33 PM

Alex - This is an awesome idea. I love my Lodge, but I think I will love it more after I give it your treatment. Thanks for posting this.

2
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11048)

on August 20, 2012
at 01:26 PM

I use both cast iron and enameled. I have a big cast iron skillet (Lodge) and two Dutch oven (one is Lodge). Unless camping, I only use the Dutch oven for things like coq au vin of if feeding a large group. I use the skillet almost daily and, once properly seasoned, the texture Alex refers to disappears.

I use the enameled Dutch oven for roasting birds, beef roasts or short ribs, and pork roasts. Clean up is easy and it cooks evenly.

1
3899bf80f345c760036a7fcc490fd727

on August 20, 2012
at 06:54 AM

A trip to your thrift store may net a very nice cast iron skillet for a couple bucks. I see them all the time at our local store. Peoople donate them, not knowing what a treasure they really are. Sometimes the seasoning is already done, and they need only a little touch up. Sometimes they need a little TLC, but for a tenth of the price, I can afford a little elbow grease.

1
9a783f1b60e2936f07f1f38fc62c11e4

on August 20, 2012
at 04:21 AM

Lodge is a great brand, and made in the USA. I've heard it is wise to avoid Made in China "cast iron" because there can be lots of other metals and bad stuff in them. I'm not an expert but I don't think you should worry too much about the iron leeching-- you certainly won't be anemic but unless you're taking other iron supplements I don't think using cast iron will put you over into excessive amounts.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 20, 2012
at 07:12 PM

Be careful: I purchased a beautiful Lodge enameled dutch oven, and chose the brand because it was made in the USA. So imagine my disappointment when the package arrived, and it was made in China. Lodge apparently licenses some of their stuff overseas, and does not necessarily disclose this, at least not on Amazon, etc.

0
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on August 20, 2012
at 06:30 PM

If I were to recommend anything, go with this:

https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/product1_new.asp?menu=logic&idProduct=4044

Basically, the shallow skillet doubles as a lid and gives you a dutch oven. Properly seasoned (like people above have said) it never causes me any problems, and my wife and I use it often, in a myriad of combinations. It's especially good for meats, I find, including in stews or curries.

Best of luck!

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 20, 2012
at 11:53 AM

I agree. I have switched to Lodge because I think their products are very good, and a great value. I have four a 12" skillet, a grill pan, a pizza pan (which I use to saute veggies on my grill), and an enameled Dutch oven. I use these four pans about 95% of the time I am cooking.

Enameled is not about season vs non-season. Enameled pans are usually beneficial if you are cooking things that have high acidity. I got my dutch oven enameled because I like the flexibility.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on August 20, 2012
at 07:15 PM

I agree re: acidic foods. I use the enameled one for soups with tomatoes, for instance. I don't like cooking acidic food in a seasoned cast iron skillet because it causes the seasoning to deteriorate.

0
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on August 20, 2012
at 10:17 AM

I don't have experience with enamel cookware, but you can get a Lodge 12" skillet with lid for around 45 bucks that your great-great-great-great-grandkids will fight over. Mine handles about 90% of my cooking.

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