0

votes

Iodine deficiency

Answered on October 27, 2013
Created October 25, 2013 at 9:05 AM

My thyroid is not working properly due to hormonal imbalances. The values are still within reference values but I used to be towards the higher end and not like now. I'm not eating much salt and the salt I do eat is not iodinesed, but from the sea. Women tend to get iodine deficiency more often than men as well. Is there some kind of tool where I can put my food consumption in to see what the micros are? Iodine is not very good to overdose but I suspect I might have a little bit to less of it.

Medium avatar

(0)

on October 26, 2013
at 08:50 PM

Take a 5-7 km run 2-3 times a week with my dog. 1-2 HIIT sessions and weightlifting 2-3 times a week. I'm quite an active person. I dont consider my self to work out that much and if I'm tired or busy with something else I skip work out.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 26, 2013
at 08:30 PM

Yes probably, I was also curious after I saw your comment and was surprised by this difference. I have the feeling though that iodide is a bit more natural than iodate when it comes to choosing the optimal source.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 26, 2013
at 07:21 PM

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 26, 2013
at 06:15 PM

Take everything you read from Weston Price Foundation with a grain of salt. You'll find few modern studies there. That article talks about things like "Atomidine" and "Nascent iodine", utter BS really.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 26, 2013
at 06:09 PM

If somebody reports health problems on paleo the odds are high its because of hypothyroidism and not eating enough carbs. While I agree with the second part of your statement, I don't think the paleo diet is a good diet for somebody with thyroid problems.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 26, 2013
at 05:53 PM

I think enough have been hurt to justify a critical discussion of these issues and inform newcomers about the caveats of this diet.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 26, 2013
at 05:36 PM

True causes? You're the one going around warning of low carb diets inducing hypothyroidism, that is not cause of the epidemic levels of hypothyroidism in the population.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 26, 2013
at 05:31 PM

Exceptions do not prove the rule. The handful of LC'ers who end up doing some sort of damage, are dwarfed by the LC'ers who cure their metabolic derangement. Paleo dieters who induce hypothyroidism by diet are again dwarfed by other diet induced hypothyroidism cases. It's all perspective, and your posts lack it.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 26, 2013
at 02:59 PM

And you sure like downvoting things not on the basis of its validity but just because they don't fit into your own preconceived ideas of health. Pretty immature for somebody who is on this site here for so long. Given all the reports of people failing on paleo that arrive here every week, I'd expect you to have a more rational and liberal view on these issues.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:14 PM

You sure like jamming every 'square' problem into the 'round' diet-induced-hypothyroidism hole.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 26, 2013
at 03:28 AM

worth doing a 'convert to comment' on this one supergirl, so you you can direct your thanks to the correct person

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:59 AM

You yourself said to eat a pro-thyroid diet. I do believe this would include a source of iodine. The number 1 source of iodine is organic seaweed. Seaweed it uuuuup!

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:54 AM

Yeah, this was an interesting discussion.

Iodine -> sodium/iodide X inverse(intracellular iodine saturation) - goitrogenic binding x NIS gene expression -> TSH (+ feedback to NIS gene expression) -> T3 + T4 -> feedback to TSH

You can't have thyroid function without that very first ingredient that kicks off the whole thing. But, given gene expression and intracellular saturation, it can get messed up.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:47 AM

And I dont think you do her much good by just recommending to "Seaweed it up". But you guys don't seem to be interested in the true causes of thyroid problems, so go ahead... I won't be post more here.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:43 AM

What I want to convey is that thyroid health is far more complex than just downing some Lugols. I had the impression that the author of this topic equalized thyroid problems with iodine deficiency. It's not that simple.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:34 AM

I have to agree with Matt on this one. That particular study isn't relevant to this discussion. (That article you linked shows that if you give 1/48th of the dose of iodine that people in Japan eat as normal everyday life to sick people with symptoms characterized as both hypo and hyper, that a portion of those patients will still be hypo or hyper or no change at all.)

"Adequate iodine intake--the good far outweighs the bad."

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:30 AM

Hashimoto's is the major cause of hypothyroidism, so if you talk about hypothyroidism, you're talking about hashimoto.

It's interesting that you're consistently downvoting my posts. Am I conveying an inconvenient truth?

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:09 AM

Interesting fact about Europe. I got my information from an article I can't locate that stated the U.S. used iodide in the 50's to counter goiter in the Midwest. Wikipedia says that "In everyday life, iodide is most commonly encountered as a component of iodized salt, which many governments mandate." So, I assumed that the U.S. is still using iodide.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:01 AM

Hashimoto's thyroiditis is not normal thyroid function. You cannot generalize from a disease state.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on October 25, 2013
at 10:59 PM

What? Here in the formerly known Goiter Belt we respectfully disagree. Midwestern soils have no iodine, and low zinc and selenium.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 25, 2013
at 10:23 PM

1) Please show me the evidence for that.

2) One that supports optimal cellular respiration by supplying adequate energy and nutrients and avoids anti-metabolic factors.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 25, 2013
at 10:17 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9703374 You'll find more by googling.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 10:14 PM

Iodine is required for thyroid function, so you just can't say it suppresses it. The issue is how much you're eating and how your symporters deal with it. Too much is bad, too little is bad, you go hypo or hyper either way. If you want to stop TSH synth, just eat a bunch as your body will downregulate and take in less iodide across the substrate (which determines the amount of enzymatic action as a ratelimiting factor.) It's complex with genetic and env factors that play out. Eating more can make your body use less. T3 / T4 are produced by TSH stim.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:51 PM

In Europe salt is fortified with potassium iodate and not iodide. Iodate is still 97% stable after 8 months of storage.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:49 PM

That's wrong. Salt is fortified with iodate and not iodine. Iodate is still 97% stable after 8 months of storage.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:36 PM

It's a pretty cool looking gas.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:25 PM

I meant it like I said it. In countries were iodized salt was introduced the incidence of hypothyroidism increased.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:24 PM

potassium bromate (a bromine & potassium based powder) is used in some countries around the world in the bread making processing (& banned in others).

not that most here eat bread now, but may have done in the past.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:02 PM

This would be the one you want to read -- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20172475

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 08:40 PM

Iodide uptake into thyroid cell is the rate-limiting factor in hormone synth. In susceptible individuals the sodium-iodide symporter fails to shut down, the intracellular concentration of iodide remains high and chronic hypothyroidism ensues. To complicate matters, iodine excess may also cause hyperthyroidism. So, either way. (wolff-chaikoff effect.) http://i.imgur.com/XGJeKqX.png

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 06:45 PM

Oh, it's paleo fa sho! Best if you avoid the Chinese seaweeds and go straight for the good USDA Organic ones. (I find they taste less 'fishy' too.)

Medium avatar

(0)

on October 25, 2013
at 10:37 AM

@paleot thanks for the advice, I love seaweed, just din't know if it was paleo :)

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:50 AM

Seaweed it up! But not too much. You can easily grab 90mcg or so from a single sheet of nori which is a little under the daily requirement. Throw a few sheets down with some cod and it might be too much and suppress thyroid function. Interestingly in Japan, they eat a TON of iodine (like 10mg+ everyday.) I don't know how they pull it off (maybe the soy / goitrogens tone it down?)

There's a cheap test you can do with an iodine patch on your skin. That could be interesting to check. Or the more expensive / accurate Iodine Loading test.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:17 AM

i don't know of such a tool, hopefully someone will come up with something. the nutrition DB's i have seen don't seem to report/measure iodine.

other than getting sufficient (what ever that is) iodine, you should also minimise/avoid the other competing halogens; fluorine, chlorine and bromine, as these will displace iodine in the body (or something like that).

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (0)
  • Views
    5.3K
  • Last Activity
    1697D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

9 Answers

0
Medium avatar

on October 26, 2013
at 06:29 PM

I dont eat low carb, or well i eat perhaps 75-100 gr carbs a day. But the reason is my pco it makes me insulin resistant so I need to balance it out. When insulin works better I can add more potatoes in my diet. But currently it's spiking my insulin. I would never have tried paleo unless I had those problems. But now that I've tried and i feel better I will probably stick to it. Mastering hormonal problems takes a while so I will try this till the end of this year and see what the test results say.

Medium avatar

(0)

on October 26, 2013
at 08:50 PM

Take a 5-7 km run 2-3 times a week with my dog. 1-2 HIIT sessions and weightlifting 2-3 times a week. I'm quite an active person. I dont consider my self to work out that much and if I'm tired or busy with something else I skip work out.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 26, 2013
at 07:21 PM

0
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:38 PM

The link below is the only food/nutrition database that i have seen that actually includes the iodide/iodine content of foods. It's Finnish wed site.

Finnish Food Composition Database

So @Supergirl you can search your foods to check there iodine content, a bit manual i know, but usefull all the same

0
00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:33 PM

The problem with any artificially iodized salt is that the iodine is very volatile and will sublime/evaporate in about 30 days from any salt exposed to the air.

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:51 PM

In Europe salt is fortified with potassium iodate and not iodide. Iodate is still 97% stable after 8 months of storage.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:36 PM

It's a pretty cool looking gas.

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:09 AM

Interesting fact about Europe. I got my information from an article I can't locate that stated the U.S. used iodide in the 50's to counter goiter in the Midwest. Wikipedia says that "In everyday life, iodide is most commonly encountered as a component of iodized salt, which many governments mandate." So, I assumed that the U.S. is still using iodide.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:01 PM

Also, you can find iodized sea salt these days...

0
Medium avatar

on October 25, 2013
at 08:31 PM

@Bukowski

Think you've mixed it up with HYPERthyroidism, that's caused by too much iodine. But HYPOthyroidism is caused by a deficit. It wasn't very common 20 years ago since almost all salt was iodinated then, but now it's becoming more and more common again.

"Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are one of the biggest worldwide public health problem of today. Their effect is hidden and profoundly affects the quality of human life. Iodine deficiency occurs when the soil is poor in iodine, causing a low concentration in food products and insufficient iodine intake in the population. When iodine requirements are not met, the thyroid may no longer be able to synthesize sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3074887/

Medium avatar

(15)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:25 PM

I meant it like I said it. In countries were iodized salt was introduced the incidence of hypothyroidism increased.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 08:40 PM

Iodide uptake into thyroid cell is the rate-limiting factor in hormone synth. In susceptible individuals the sodium-iodide symporter fails to shut down, the intracellular concentration of iodide remains high and chronic hypothyroidism ensues. To complicate matters, iodine excess may also cause hyperthyroidism. So, either way. (wolff-chaikoff effect.) http://i.imgur.com/XGJeKqX.png

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:02 PM

This would be the one you want to read -- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20172475

0
Medium avatar

on October 25, 2013
at 08:17 PM

Iodine deficiency does only cause hypothyroidism in very extreme deficiency states. That is practically impossible on US soil (which is rich in iodine). Iodine excess, in contrast, is a common cause of hypothyroidism.

If you have thyroid problems, you're better of either trying a pro-thyroid diet (that is not the paleo diet unfortunately) or directly go and experiment with NDT, cynoplus and cynomel.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 26, 2013
at 12:14 PM

You sure like jamming every 'square' problem into the 'round' diet-induced-hypothyroidism hole.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on October 25, 2013
at 10:59 PM

What? Here in the formerly known Goiter Belt we respectfully disagree. Midwestern soils have no iodine, and low zinc and selenium.

0
Medium avatar

on October 25, 2013
at 08:15 PM

Thanks for the reply, very helpful!

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 26, 2013
at 03:28 AM

worth doing a 'convert to comment' on this one supergirl, so you you can direct your thanks to the correct person

0
7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on October 25, 2013
at 02:48 PM

video link from your link.(couldnt fit in comments)

seems interesting, i may try this.

http://www.utopiasilver.com/iodinetranscript.htm

Iodine Patch Test I’m now going to demonstrate how you can test yourself for whether you have enough iodine in your body or not, it’s called the “iodine patch test” … you simply take a bottle of Lugol’s iodine, or another form of iodine, put some of it on your skin … let it absorb into your skin … in the area of about one-inch square is sufficient, of course, we let it dry, we can see the reddish-brown color of the iodine.

How to interpret the results of the test are: if all of this color is absorbed through your skin into the body in less then eight hours, you have a very severe deficiency of iodine in your body; eight to sixteen hours, you have a moderate deficiency; sixteen to twenty-four hours, you have a slight to moderate deficiency. Only if it takes twenty-four hours or more for this to slowly fade away, does it indicate that you have enough iodine in your body, …which, according to Dr. Guy Abraham, is 1500 milligrams total quantity of iodine in a full-saturated iodine patient.

This is a simple way, and although it is easy to do, it apparently correlates very well with the much more scientific, medical, and technical way of testing for iodine, which is to take a loading dose and check a 24-hour urine [sample] to see how much of it you’ve dumped out of your body, …the rest of it, presumably, having been absorbed into your tissues. This is an easy way … you can do this test every one to two weeks, as you’re trying to do your loading on the Lugol’s iodine, as outlined by Dr. Guy Abraham, M.D..

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on October 25, 2013
at 10:43 AM

There is a simple test you can perform. Get some Lugol's Solution and paint a square with it on your skin, some part that's not normally visible, say a 3" square and wait for it to dry before putting on clothes.

If it takes a very long time to vanish - more than a day, you don't need any more iodine. If it goes away in less than a day, you need more. The quicker it goes away, the more you need.

There is some controversy over this test's effectiveness, this article explains more:

http://www.westonaprice.org/metabolic-disorders/the-great-iodine-debate

Lugol's Solution is a Iodine and Potassium Iodide solution, you can add a few drops of it in water and drink it. I usually have a teaspoon of seasalt in water for adrenal support with about a teaspoon of tamarind paste (which is known to chelate fluoride). I add a few drops of Lugols to this a few times a week.

You can use this site to see what nutrients are in food, including iodine levels:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/

however, note that what was tested is going to differ from what you ate depending on soil content, etc.

The big problem is that if we're low on iodine, things like chlorine and bromides, flame retardants in mattresses, couches, and carpeting, are readily absorbed into the thyroid and cause many problems. Worse, with disasters such as Fukushima, radioactive iodine was released into the environment. Luckily, those isotopes have a short half-life (~8 days), so that's no longer much of a worry. If you hear any news of such a disaster, and you happen to be near it, immediately dose yourself with as much iodine as possible to protect your thyroid...

Unfortunately, iodine and Lugol's solution is expensive because in the 1980s or 1990s, there was some sort of idiotic backlash against iodine and large containers of it were pulled off the market, and now it's available in only tiny amounts. Another possibility is to get iodoral tablets and convert them into Lugol's. Couldn't find the right instructions but there's some pointers here: http://tinyurl.com/iodine-instructions

Edit: Warning: one thing I forgot to add to this: be sure to balance the iodine out with some selenium. You don't necessarily want to take them together. I take iodine in the morning, and when I do, the same night, or afternoon, I take a chelated selenium source. Iodine and selenium must be taken together and must be balanced out: http://chriskresser.com/selenium-the-missing-link-for-treating-hypothyroidism

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 25, 2013
at 09:24 PM

potassium bromate (a bromine & potassium based powder) is used in some countries around the world in the bread making processing (& banned in others).

not that most here eat bread now, but may have done in the past.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 26, 2013
at 06:15 PM

Take everything you read from Weston Price Foundation with a grain of salt. You'll find few modern studies there. That article talks about things like "Atomidine" and "Nascent iodine", utter BS really.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!