6

votes

How much seaweed can we eat without overdosing on Iodine if we do not eat table salt?

Answered on November 10, 2017
Created September 18, 2011 at 6:56 PM

I found some nori and kelp at a local store and I must say YUM. After viewing the nutritional profile I realized that this will help with getting more minerals in my diet. Hopefully even keep the muscle cramps at bay! The only salt we get during the day is from uncured bacon in the morning. Im not sure if that is regular table salt that has iodine in it. Basically how much seaweed can we eat without putting ourselves at risk of overdosing on iodine? I read somewhere no more than 2 weeks at a time without a 2 week break or something and that it is supposed to be a sometimes food not an all the time food. I was thinking that I could add it to my lunch 3x a week so there will be a day in between. Thoughts?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 27, 2012
at 02:38 AM

Yes but the japanese eat high iodine life-long. They are not fluctuating. Immigrants from europe (generally lower iodine), to the US (generally higher, but not extreme like japan) get hyperthyroid disease often enough for it to have its own name as a syndrome and to be a recognised phenomena. So in practice, people should probably stick with in the range of iodine their thyroid has become accostumed to if possible.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 18, 2011
at 07:10 PM

Oh wow thank you! So 3x a week should be ok then=) I am pretty sure I get plenty of selenium with all the eggs I consume. I do not think I am deficient enough for goiter or anything.

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9 Answers

3
Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on September 18, 2011
at 07:30 PM

I have a packet of kelp flakes which come with a prominently displayed warning not to consume in excess of 1 tsp per week. Perhaps the company which produces them is simply being cautious, although the tricky thing about seaweeds is that their mineral and iodine content fluctuates significanly depending on environment and varietal. My advice would be to contact the company directly for nutritional information and then work it out from there.

3
Medium avatar

on September 18, 2011
at 07:00 PM

Excess iodine is readily excreted in a dose-dependent fashion. There are portions of the Japanese population that have massive intakes of iodine with apparently no ill-effects, though I wouldn't really recommend replicating that. Eating a bit of kelp here and there and overshooting slightly with the iodine is perfectly safe. Just make sure you eat enough selenium as well.

One possible problem though is in rapidly ramping up the intake, since your thyroid has become accustomed to your intake and there may be an initial hyperthyroid pulse as a result of a huge dose out of nowhere. This is more pronounced in a severely deficient person with a goiter etc. If you slowly increase dosage, taking it every day should be fine.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 18, 2011
at 07:10 PM

Oh wow thank you! So 3x a week should be ok then=) I am pretty sure I get plenty of selenium with all the eggs I consume. I do not think I am deficient enough for goiter or anything.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 27, 2012
at 02:38 AM

Yes but the japanese eat high iodine life-long. They are not fluctuating. Immigrants from europe (generally lower iodine), to the US (generally higher, but not extreme like japan) get hyperthyroid disease often enough for it to have its own name as a syndrome and to be a recognised phenomena. So in practice, people should probably stick with in the range of iodine their thyroid has become accostumed to if possible.

1
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 27, 2012
at 02:18 AM

I always like to point out other foods with iodine: a couple of eggs (28mcg per egg), a glass of milk/cheese/yogurt (glass of milk is about 70 mcg), some cranberry juice (very high), some fish (100mcg or so per 100 grams), or coconut flesh/cream/milk (very high).

There is a little bit of iodine in everything (usually about 10-30mcg per 100 grams), but those ones I mentioned are all high.

Contrary to popular beleif, iodine is not a rare nutrient, nor is it only high in seafood.

Iodised salt is also pretty excessive one teaspoon has two days rda in it.

So are most seaweeds. Nori would probably be the exception though, if your only having it in gram type amounts (say 1-5 - it has 16mcg iodine per gram of weight which is still very high), it shouldnt be excessive.

If you want to eat seaweed, and you do normally eat the above list of foods, you could always sub one of those out for a couple of grams of seaweed (although, personally id rather have the eggs, dairy, coconut etc!)

Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can be induced by large changes in iodine consumption. The thyroid is a delicate organ. And yes, most people do seem to tolerate larger amounts to some degree, but you dont want to be the person who is suddenly sick because of rapid dietary changes.

If you moderate the seaweed, you should be okay. Although, I have no idea how much seaweed one normally eats in a sitting.

0
C86e8521172980ade23216d2267a4981

on November 10, 2017
at 02:47 PM

Travis how much do people eat. Hosan sea weed mini sheets comes about ten sheets per pack = 4.5gram and they recommend only 2.5 g daily of sheets, so one pack for 2 days comsumption. Though tase wise I could 4 packs as they are very morish. The body does not self regulate so consumption has to monitored, the lady commenting on oil was being very careless in her approach as disregarded the Iodine content. WHen the oil content was a non event and Iodine could be serious. Cheers Mike

0
B391bada23d13a08ceeefbbfb0d1afab

on November 05, 2016
at 05:05 PM

from what I've read, it's harder to overdose on nori vs dulce and other types of seaweed, especially those packed into supplements.

0
1f7faf48a568da4029609a291711547e

on April 22, 2014
at 12:08 PM

Seaweed is higher in iodine. For example, if you read Napiers Seagreen Organic Kelp Capsules (Ascophyllum) analysis which was proven in their research to correct iodine deficiency, there is 350 mcg per 500 mg - that's about half a level teaspoon, a lot higher than the 28 mcg in an egg. Quoting from their article "In cases where seaweed has been linked with thyroid problems, such as the 6 - 12% of Japanese fishermen who have goitre, it has been found that their intakes are 10 - 20 mg/d (10,000 - 20,000 mcg) of iodine (i.e. 14 - 28.5g of Ascophyllum) ~ extremely high levels of intake indeed!" The WHO upper safe limit is 1100 mg per day (about 1 1/2 teaspoon ground Ascophyllum). A lot of the scare about iodine is the effect of potassium iodide from salt which is confused with seaweed (chelated) iodine which is absorbed and excreted at a different and much gentler rate. As we were paleo hunters once and spent the summers at the seaside, I imagine our bodies are well adapted to large amounts of seaweed and fish, although poorly adapted to potassium iodide. As a generalisation, vegetables are great for the human diet and chemicals cause side effects.

0
6fece842bd1bcf5724f458a302a2156e

on October 28, 2012
at 05:44 PM

Would one sheet (5 sheets in total weigh 11g in the packet, made in China) be safe, perhaps every few days?

0
F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on September 26, 2012
at 05:12 PM

You should be more worried about pollutants and heavy metals, especially if you're buying cheap nori that comes from China. A lot of Chinese nori is grown in ocean farms near industrial centers that produce prodigious amounts of heavy metals and other dangerous aquatic pollutants. Mothers and young children should be especially cautious about consuming cheap nori.

I recommend buying higher-quality seaweed from reputable companies. My favorite is SeaSnax, which is produced in South Korea and (as far as I can tell) follows strict guidelines for purity and safety:

http://store.seasnax.com/

0
C8a0d967ae8f25d7e2ae74106f4c0ad2

on September 26, 2012
at 04:43 PM

men 100-150 mg iodine per day; women 150-300 mg per iodine per day. look at the back of the packaging. if the iodine per 1 tablespoon is 330% for the serving then you know you need at least 1/3 of that serving. iodine levels fluctuate per species so some will give more than others. im using 1/4-1/2 teaspoon dolce seaweed(dried, uncooked) per week. and this is damn near safe.

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