23

votes

Why is Ghrelin not as Talked about as Much as Leptin? Or is it?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 20, 2011 at 9:22 PM

Leptophiles please help me out here. By now we are all keenly aware that Leptin is a bad mama jamma. She is the hormone that tells our hypothalami that we are full. She is secreted by fat cells. An overabundance of this lady annoys our brains and makes them ignore her constant nagging. This is bad because even though she is nagging and annoying she is telling our brains something very important - "Stop your eating already! You're getting fat!"

Leptin is also inflammatory - she'll screw a lot of things up in too high a dose for too long a time. But then here comes Ghrelin (not Gremlin although I wish it was called this because that was an awesome movie). Ghrelin as we know is the make you hungry guy. He makes us uncomfortable, but despite the discomfort, good things are happening - things like autophagy and reduced inflammation. I have heard that Ghrelin is the yin to Leptin's yang. When one is high the other is low.

I have also read that it is reduced autophagy in the brain caused by caloric excess that causes hypothalami inflammation, increased set point and accelerated obesity. I think that I read that it is hypothalami inflammation which is one of the major causes of leptin resistance.

So, given this, wouldn't the best thing to do when someone is "Leptin resistant" be to just to go hungry for a bit? I know it's easier said than done, but wouldn't the increased Ghrelin cause the chronically elevated Leptin to shup up for a bit? Wouldn't a little fasting or a reduced eating window (a la fasting) combined with reducing sugars and processed carbs eventually reduce brain inflammation and "reset" the Leptin switches?

*Since we are all so up on Leptin these days *8why don't we also hear more about Ghrelin? Is it not equally important? Since it is the anti inflammatory hormone shouldn't we be focusing on how to best live with it for longer periods of time? *

Maybe some focused non-eating time is just as important as the Paleo foods we choose to eat?

I dunno. I'm just trying to decomplicate the highly complicated Leptin shenanigans, but WAIT! Look up there - whammo! Shit just got complicated again. Dang it all - sorry.

But that's me - I am a simpleton. Any input into my above complicated question would be great. Thanks.

Sincerely,

Little Miss Can't Be Wrong

http://www.jbc.org/content/286/37/32324.short

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 24, 2011
at 03:20 AM

@mem, as a (I hope) former yo-yo I can confirm the pattern you described. In the past when I lost weight the more I lost the hungrier I got until I reached a point where I exploded. The "binge" lasted long enough to regain all weight lost plus ... Anyhow, something is different this time. I'm getting less hungry rather than more; I'm getting no reaction to SAD foods instead of overwhelmingly strong ones. I don't know what's happening but it's definitely a place I've never been.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on October 21, 2011
at 07:07 PM

fascinating, thanks!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 21, 2011
at 04:37 PM

I still think there may be a mitochondrial dysfunction occurring that undermines programmed cell death in unnecessary adipocytes. I would of course be leaning toward a missing nutrient like manganese, but who knows.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 21, 2011
at 05:50 AM

@Meredith - I am.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 21, 2011
at 04:47 AM

(con't) is at least often useless if not downright dangerous to consider taking the freely offered advice of the many that don't get it. I consider myself to be fortunate to have and use the tools that I do as I exercise about 1/2 as much as research shows the vast majority of successful maintainers do on the National Weight Loss Registry. However, when I exercise is crucial, as is the combination of types, and the fact that is is daily, 99.9% of the time. There are other factors, and other ways to make it less of a challenge, but NOT if you are post obese and at an *optimum* weight.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 21, 2011
at 04:38 AM

@TRavis: I am 10 years out post obese. If the magic is coming, it hasn't arrived yet. What makes it works is lots and lots of tools. Research, in fact, says just the opposite of what you seem to be implying...that the push-back metabolically gets WORSE with every year passing of being post obese. I don't "live there" in my head. But give that a mere 3% of all losers keep it off, and the majority not only regain but load on more, what do you think? Those who make it learn tools and use them and in my opinion, become a "committee of ONE," meaning that so few ppl understand this but us, that it

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 21, 2011
at 04:33 AM

(con't) important for us. As well, there are other "tricks of the trade." One I use is just the right amount and timing of coffee intake. If I take in just the right amount, but not too much, it successfully cuts hunger, so that, for instance, I can successfully IF. Manipulating exercise in relation to eating is another biggie.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 21, 2011
at 04:29 AM

@Meredith: Yes, the hunger of a formerly obese person will be greater than those of the same size who are not post obese. I hesitae to say this, as so far, I have not seen here that it can be"heard." One way of dealing with this is to manipulate macros so that the protein/fat intake is appreciably higher...leads to greater and longer lasting satiety. Conversely, the opposite occurs for many of us with appreciable carb levels. Satiety is not just about feeling "full" at a meal. It is about being able not to feel hungry too soon and too often. So, learning how to manipulate intake can be very

499f188c87c6980742b9ba98caa6f563

(683)

on October 21, 2011
at 03:00 AM

Underneath his hypothalamus Chuck Norris HAS ANOTHER FIST!

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on October 21, 2011
at 01:48 AM

http://pharmrev.aspetjournals.org/content/61/4/430.full review to look at

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 21, 2011
at 01:34 AM

@ben 1.21 jigawatts - of course.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 21, 2011
at 01:25 AM

How many biophotons are inside a ghrelin again?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:47 AM

Yes.....we can learn to control autophagy. This is why it hasmits own levee. How to control it is one of the resets goals.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:42 AM

Thanks Mal! So I wonder- since we can become resistant to MANY hormones can we become resistant to Ghrelin??? I have been on BOTH sides of the weight thing. I do NOT think that Ana is good in any way - BUT I have read that Ana peeps have fewer cancers and other degenerative disease. ALSO Anas have little appetite despite HIGH ghrelin.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:35 AM

It takes several years to be able to pull off autophagy? If people fast too soon they can have heart failure? Am I understanding this right? I am all about "looking stuff up" and since I am a stay at home mom and not a Dr. I have A LOT of time - just not a lot of brain power.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:31 AM

And there is alot more to it too......

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:22 AM

plus, a little further, ghrelin is related to the level of obestatin, which in part controls ghrelin release

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:17 AM

anorexics have increased basal grehlin that normalizes after weight gain, same with leptin and neruopeptide Y

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:06 AM

The leptin rx makes you a supreme master of autophagy after several years. It corrects sleep huge. And considering the human heart fails with autographic failure 100% of the time and its the number one cause of death in both sexes......you might want to learn a bit more about it

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:01 AM

I have not got to the incretins. But i have mentioned them here and there

83d6a06c93bb3490dbca339cbbb63385

(526)

on October 20, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Me, too. Now I feel better. Thanks.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on October 20, 2011
at 11:23 PM

Interestingly RE adipocyte hyperplasia, it has been observed that some people who regain weight after liposuction remain lean at the site of surgery but carry fat elsewhere in highly unusual ways, like round the shoulder area.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 11:01 PM

@Matthew - are you on facebook?

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:42 PM

Also, isn't ghrelin elevated in people who have lost considerable amounts of weight? Also their leptin levels are lower than someone of the same weight simply because they have lost a lot of fat mass? Does this make formerly obese people more hungry than others of their same size? What can be done about this I wonder?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:41 PM

If an obese person fasts, they will still have high leptin since it reflects how much body fat they have and if it causes an increase in ghrelin, they will become even hungrier. Quilt's aim is to make that leptin which is circulating in excess actually get recognized by the hypothalamus, which would decrease appetite in general.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:41 PM

I should have mentioned that I have been fasting (I am not looking for weight loss, just the purported benefits of autophagy and simplifying my life a bit) and here are two interesting things I have noticed: First when I do eat I am like super satiated for hours after - and this is not with any more food than I was eating before. Second - since I am pretty hongry when it's time to eat I find simpler foods to be pretty goddamn tasty!

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:26 PM

Ghrelin is lower in the obese - leptin is elevated. Anorexics have huge ghrelin levels and very low leptin. When one is high the other low, yes? I'm not saying it's signalling gone wrong - I don't even know what they hell that means. I'm just saying that there is an imbalance. Maybe fasting is one simple tool to bring things back into balance for those who have high leptin and low ghrelin. ????

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:20 PM

How sure are you guys that it's permanent? How many years has it been since you've been obese?

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:14 PM

mem is correct. There is no going back for us. I appreciate the nod to adipocyte hyperplasia as this is an issue NO ONE seems to want to talk about or even acknowledge. It is a BITCH! I did have some lipo done but there is no suction machine on this planet strong enough to make up for the extra fat cells I have t carry with me for forever.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:10 PM

I must have been a Hadza in a former life. Seriously I am always hungry and I get a little sick and tired of all the promises of eating to satiety and never being hungry on paleo. NOT my experience at all. And yes I'm a genetic fat freak but these blanket statements that you will never be hungry on paleo (or that you should not be or your doing it wrong) really stick in my craw. But yeah, promises like this sells books.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Ah, there will be no "going back" to a default # of fat cells for the post-obese. Those fat cells are there to stay...

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:50 PM

It's true; the Hadza report very often being hungry but almost never starving.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:49 PM

Happy Now: I always thought that it was a totally stupid and dangerous procedure but have communicated with a formerly obese woman who swore that 1) taking leptin injections and finally 2) having liposuction were the only things that worked for her. Liposuction in a never-obese, flabby person is stupid because the fat cells will regrow to their former level eventually. Perhaps this means that they will decrease to their former level as well...I don't know.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:48 PM

Happy Now: I always thought that it was a totally stupid and dangerous procedure but have communicated with a formerly obese woman who swore that 1) taking leptin injections and finally 2) having liposuction was the only thing that worked for her. Liposuction in a never-obese, flabby person is stupid because the fat cells will regrow to their former level eventually. Perhaps this means that they will decrease to their former level as well...I don't know.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:46 PM

The short (sarcastic) answer is that ghrelin doesn't make The Quilt feel all warm and tingly in his special places the way that leptin does.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:45 PM

Ah man, does this mean I should stop giving people a hard time when they are contemplating lipo? Are they just speeding up the process by evicting a big batch of fat cells.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:45 PM

Ah mah, does this mean I should stop giving people a hard time when they are contemplating lipo? Are they just speeding up the process by evicting a big batch of fat cells.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:43 PM

Post weight-loss Hypoleptinemia. It is a very interesting issue that is not talked about much.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:34 PM

Tis the Ghremlins in your tummy that gives you the munchies.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:33 PM

In the end doesn't Leptin turn off hunger? I'm trying to keep it simple because like in Chess, when I get too many moves ahead I got lost.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:31 PM

Leptin sounds like lectin which is the devil. Also, ghrelin sounds like gremlin - and we all know that Gizmo REFUSED FOOD after midnight - so it was his fasting that kept him from turning EVIL!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:30 PM

Leptin doesn't say we're full, it says the fat cells are not empty.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:25 PM

You've overlooked the most obvious reason. Leptin sounds like Lipton, which is good, and Ghrelin sounds like Gremlin, which is bad.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:23 PM

As far as I know, Leptin only exists because Chuck Norris allows it to.

  • 0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

    asked by

    (16131)
  • Views
    4K
  • Last Activity
    1282D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

8
Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:43 PM

Well I'll take a chance on the downvotes and say that it's because satiation sells diet books.

But hunger was probably something that paleos experienced far more often than satiation.

83d6a06c93bb3490dbca339cbbb63385

(526)

on October 20, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Me, too. Now I feel better. Thanks.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:10 PM

I must have been a Hadza in a former life. Seriously I am always hungry and I get a little sick and tired of all the promises of eating to satiety and never being hungry on paleo. NOT my experience at all. And yes I'm a genetic fat freak but these blanket statements that you will never be hungry on paleo (or that you should not be or your doing it wrong) really stick in my craw. But yeah, promises like this sells books.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:50 PM

It's true; the Hadza report very often being hungry but almost never starving.

5
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:03 AM

Ghrelin has its own circadian rythmn that is very disordered in eating disorders. That is a mamoth discussion that is coming.

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:22 AM

plus, a little further, ghrelin is related to the level of obestatin, which in part controls ghrelin release

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:31 AM

And there is alot more to it too......

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:17 AM

anorexics have increased basal grehlin that normalizes after weight gain, same with leptin and neruopeptide Y

5
Medium avatar

on October 20, 2011
at 09:39 PM

I think the actual issue at hand for the formerly obese is adipocyte hyperplasia (an increase in fat cell number that occurs when they can't get larger). I believe that when you are post-obese, but have several times as many fat cells as the never-obese, each fat cell is filled to a lesser extent than your never-obese counterpart. Therefore, your fat cells are, as a whole, secreting less leptin than a never-obese person who has the same total storage of triglycerides in their adipocytes. I don't think that leptin secretion is linear, but rather starts above a certain threshold of storage.

I've been searching for a way to accelerate adipocyte apoptosis in the post-obese, but it's looking like they just need to wait it out and stay lean by whatever means necessary until they go back down to a default number of adipocytes. This is assuming that the body doesn't maintain the "high water point" forever.

There isn't a lot of research on this, so it's kind of tough.

Edit: Oh, and to actually answer your question, plasma ghrelin levels are actually lower in the obese than the non-obese, so it doesn't appear that the signalling has gone haywire.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Ah, there will be no "going back" to a default # of fat cells for the post-obese. Those fat cells are there to stay...

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:45 PM

Ah man, does this mean I should stop giving people a hard time when they are contemplating lipo? Are they just speeding up the process by evicting a big batch of fat cells.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:49 PM

Happy Now: I always thought that it was a totally stupid and dangerous procedure but have communicated with a formerly obese woman who swore that 1) taking leptin injections and finally 2) having liposuction were the only things that worked for her. Liposuction in a never-obese, flabby person is stupid because the fat cells will regrow to their former level eventually. Perhaps this means that they will decrease to their former level as well...I don't know.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:48 PM

Happy Now: I always thought that it was a totally stupid and dangerous procedure but have communicated with a formerly obese woman who swore that 1) taking leptin injections and finally 2) having liposuction was the only thing that worked for her. Liposuction in a never-obese, flabby person is stupid because the fat cells will regrow to their former level eventually. Perhaps this means that they will decrease to their former level as well...I don't know.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 21, 2011
at 04:38 AM

@TRavis: I am 10 years out post obese. If the magic is coming, it hasn't arrived yet. What makes it works is lots and lots of tools. Research, in fact, says just the opposite of what you seem to be implying...that the push-back metabolically gets WORSE with every year passing of being post obese. I don't "live there" in my head. But give that a mere 3% of all losers keep it off, and the majority not only regain but load on more, what do you think? Those who make it learn tools and use them and in my opinion, become a "committee of ONE," meaning that so few ppl understand this but us, that it

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:20 PM

How sure are you guys that it's permanent? How many years has it been since you've been obese?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:43 PM

Post weight-loss Hypoleptinemia. It is a very interesting issue that is not talked about much.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:42 PM

Also, isn't ghrelin elevated in people who have lost considerable amounts of weight? Also their leptin levels are lower than someone of the same weight simply because they have lost a lot of fat mass? Does this make formerly obese people more hungry than others of their same size? What can be done about this I wonder?

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 21, 2011
at 04:33 AM

(con't) important for us. As well, there are other "tricks of the trade." One I use is just the right amount and timing of coffee intake. If I take in just the right amount, but not too much, it successfully cuts hunger, so that, for instance, I can successfully IF. Manipulating exercise in relation to eating is another biggie.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:26 PM

Ghrelin is lower in the obese - leptin is elevated. Anorexics have huge ghrelin levels and very low leptin. When one is high the other low, yes? I'm not saying it's signalling gone wrong - I don't even know what they hell that means. I'm just saying that there is an imbalance. Maybe fasting is one simple tool to bring things back into balance for those who have high leptin and low ghrelin. ????

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 21, 2011
at 04:37 PM

I still think there may be a mitochondrial dysfunction occurring that undermines programmed cell death in unnecessary adipocytes. I would of course be leaning toward a missing nutrient like manganese, but who knows.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:41 PM

If an obese person fasts, they will still have high leptin since it reflects how much body fat they have and if it causes an increase in ghrelin, they will become even hungrier. Quilt's aim is to make that leptin which is circulating in excess actually get recognized by the hypothalamus, which would decrease appetite in general.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:45 PM

Ah mah, does this mean I should stop giving people a hard time when they are contemplating lipo? Are they just speeding up the process by evicting a big batch of fat cells.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on October 20, 2011
at 11:23 PM

Interestingly RE adipocyte hyperplasia, it has been observed that some people who regain weight after liposuction remain lean at the site of surgery but carry fat elsewhere in highly unusual ways, like round the shoulder area.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:14 PM

mem is correct. There is no going back for us. I appreciate the nod to adipocyte hyperplasia as this is an issue NO ONE seems to want to talk about or even acknowledge. It is a BITCH! I did have some lipo done but there is no suction machine on this planet strong enough to make up for the extra fat cells I have t carry with me for forever.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 21, 2011
at 04:29 AM

@Meredith: Yes, the hunger of a formerly obese person will be greater than those of the same size who are not post obese. I hesitae to say this, as so far, I have not seen here that it can be"heard." One way of dealing with this is to manipulate macros so that the protein/fat intake is appreciably higher...leads to greater and longer lasting satiety. Conversely, the opposite occurs for many of us with appreciable carb levels. Satiety is not just about feeling "full" at a meal. It is about being able not to feel hungry too soon and too often. So, learning how to manipulate intake can be very

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 21, 2011
at 04:47 AM

(con't) is at least often useless if not downright dangerous to consider taking the freely offered advice of the many that don't get it. I consider myself to be fortunate to have and use the tools that I do as I exercise about 1/2 as much as research shows the vast majority of successful maintainers do on the National Weight Loss Registry. However, when I exercise is crucial, as is the combination of types, and the fact that is is daily, 99.9% of the time. There are other factors, and other ways to make it less of a challenge, but NOT if you are post obese and at an *optimum* weight.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 24, 2011
at 03:20 AM

@mem, as a (I hope) former yo-yo I can confirm the pattern you described. In the past when I lost weight the more I lost the hungrier I got until I reached a point where I exploded. The "binge" lasted long enough to regain all weight lost plus ... Anyhow, something is different this time. I'm getting less hungry rather than more; I'm getting no reaction to SAD foods instead of overwhelmingly strong ones. I don't know what's happening but it's definitely a place I've never been.

2
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 24, 2011
at 03:03 AM

Great question! While there is definitely a leptin-grehlin-NPY signaling loop, I don't think it is accurate to say that grehlin and leptin are yin/yang in the same way as insulin and glucagon are. I plan to expand on this answer but here are a few studies to add some confusion:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12609743 This review considers grehlin to be a peripheral orexigen and NPY to be a central orexigen. They also contrast the below authors' suggestion about leptin and grehlin, saying "Recent results documenting that increased leptin expression in the hypothalamus suppressed grehlin-induced appetite and peripheral leptin decreased grehlin release from the stomach support our hypothesis that leptin may be a key in enforcing this restraint"

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18187517

This showed that the timing of grehlin peaks is related to habitual meal timing patterns, and may rise in anticipation of eating rather than eliciting feeding. Sounds like semantics, but the authors make a strong case for the primary role of grehlin to actually be in preparing the gut for processing the incoming food, not initiating meals. "hunger appears to increase prior to changes in grehlin concentrations." and that leptin does not regulate grehlin but rather plas a greater role in long term energy balance instead of a response to individual meals.

2
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on October 20, 2011
at 09:37 PM

It makes sense to me that Intermittent Fasting could decrease Leptin resistance, since insulin resistance and leptin resistance seem to go hand-in-hand and IR is improved with IF. Johnny over at LeanSaloon agrees with me here.

I know Dr. K wants folks to be leptin-sensitive before doing IF, but anecdotal hearsay (from the MDA forum) indicates that IF has worked just fine for some folks who appeared to be leptin-resistant, initially.

Of course, the general "newbie" recommendation is to eat Primal/Paleo for 6 weeks or so prior to trying IF, so perhaps all these folks had already become leptin sensitive (like me), prior to trying IF.

I learned to relax (from Johnny at LeanSaloon) when the Ghrelin "gremlins" kicked in and don't freak out when I get the hungries during a fast. Just because we are hungry doesn't mean we "need" to eat--within reason of course!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:06 AM

The leptin rx makes you a supreme master of autophagy after several years. It corrects sleep huge. And considering the human heart fails with autographic failure 100% of the time and its the number one cause of death in both sexes......you might want to learn a bit more about it

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:35 AM

It takes several years to be able to pull off autophagy? If people fast too soon they can have heart failure? Am I understanding this right? I am all about "looking stuff up" and since I am a stay at home mom and not a Dr. I have A LOT of time - just not a lot of brain power.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:47 AM

Yes.....we can learn to control autophagy. This is why it hasmits own levee. How to control it is one of the resets goals.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 20, 2011
at 10:41 PM

I should have mentioned that I have been fasting (I am not looking for weight loss, just the purported benefits of autophagy and simplifying my life a bit) and here are two interesting things I have noticed: First when I do eat I am like super satiated for hours after - and this is not with any more food than I was eating before. Second - since I am pretty hongry when it's time to eat I find simpler foods to be pretty goddamn tasty!

1
1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:27 AM

"Constitutionally thin subjects displayed intermediate 24-h plasma ghrelin and leptin levels, significantly different from controls and AN patients, whereas GH and cortisol were not modified. Ghrelin was negatively correlated with BMI, leptin, and T3 in controls, constitutionally thin subjects, and AN patients, whereas no correlation was found between GH and ghrelin or between cortisol and ghrelin. Ghrelin and BMI or T3 were still correlated after renutrition, suggesting that ghrelin is also a good nutritional indicator. Basal and GHRH-stimulated GH release were significantly increased in AN patients only. In conclusion, ghrelin is increased in AN and constitutionally thin subjects who display very low BMI but different eating behaviors, suggesting that not only is ghrelin dependent on body fat mass, but it is also influenced by nutritional status. Even though endogenous ghrelin is not strictly correlated with basal GH secretion, it may be involved in the magnitude of GHRH-induced GH release in AN patients. "

good study http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/88/1/109.short

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 21, 2011
at 12:42 AM

Thanks Mal! So I wonder- since we can become resistant to MANY hormones can we become resistant to Ghrelin??? I have been on BOTH sides of the weight thing. I do NOT think that Ana is good in any way - BUT I have read that Ana peeps have fewer cancers and other degenerative disease. ALSO Anas have little appetite despite HIGH ghrelin.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on October 21, 2011
at 07:07 PM

fascinating, thanks!

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on October 21, 2011
at 01:48 AM

http://pharmrev.aspetjournals.org/content/61/4/430.full review to look at

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!