1

votes

Running while IFing without breakfast afterwards?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 31, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Here's the thing. I like working out in the morning. However, I don't have a lot of time with my work schedule to do a full hour class. I like to take classes, so I do those in the evenings right now (TRX, Kettlebells, drills). I normally IF and then workout around 5:30 pm. Then I eat afterwards. I've been eating lunch lately, but want to cut that out.

I want to start running a short 2 miles in the morning because I've discovered that light cardio in the morning makes me feel SO good. I also like eating later in the evenings, so I don't want to end my eating window too early in the evening.

If I wake up, run 2-3 miles, DON'T eat until after my 5:30 pm workout...how will this affect my muscle mass? I will have coffee with cream and tea so I won't be in a completely fasted state before my 5:30 strength training-based workouts.

Goals: energy to focus at work (I get this from cardio) retain/build muscle mass

I'm 5'4", about 108 lbs and primal if that helps at all. I want the benefits of IF AND the energy of working out in the morning...but because of my work schedule, can't commit to something longer in the morning.

Ed0cb30f40daff568778b776b2a5a81d

(943)

on January 01, 2013
at 01:13 PM

Thanks a lot for sharing your thoughts and the link. I have been through the IF running 5 times/week and it sucks the life out of you in the long run. I also hope that I'll be able to recover but it has really surprised me how long it takes.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on January 01, 2013
at 01:39 AM

I agree. That would be pretty dumb.

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on January 01, 2013
at 01:26 AM

But the OP is talking about fasting for the rest of the day and then doing weight training and only then breaking the fast in the evening. From my personal experience, I think this would be too stressful, unless they have absolutely everything else dialed in and have close to zero stress from other sources. I think the OP would do better to have a meal around noon so that his/her eating window is not so compressed.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:30 PM

Speed is relative - 10 min/mile is quite high intensity for me...

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7 Answers

1
19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 01, 2013
at 06:31 AM

Losing muscle mass might be the least of your concerns when you consider this might burn-out your adrenal glands (adrenal fatigue). My guess is you'll be lean and ripped, but then get symptoms of adrenal fatigue. I hope if that happens you'll have the common sense to stop.

I love, love, love fasting and working out in a fasted state, but I think that's just too much. Everyday? Not just a walk, but a run, and then only eat late in the evening? That sounds like chronic stress to me to be honest.

Paleo made my adrenal fatigue a lot better but I still struggle with it a bit. I don't know if it will ever completely recover to be honest. It's not something I would wish on anyone.

http://robbwolf.com/2012/04/09/real-deal-adrenal-fatigue/

...Plus you do 2 workouts per day, how can you eat enough calories for that in such a limited eating window? You'd need 3500 calories or so? Will you eat two big dinners, one at 6pm and one at 10pm?

How do you plan to let your body/adrenals rest? When you're at work you're not exactly resting; even if you're sitting your body is still "on alert" from being in a work environment.

Wake up, work out, work, work out, cook, clean up, that sounds like it would be too taxing on your body on a fasted state. Would 8 hours of sleep be enough? For part of those sleeping hours you'll be digesting your two dinners.

(Anyway, a happy new year to you)

Ed0cb30f40daff568778b776b2a5a81d

(943)

on January 01, 2013
at 01:13 PM

Thanks a lot for sharing your thoughts and the link. I have been through the IF running 5 times/week and it sucks the life out of you in the long run. I also hope that I'll be able to recover but it has really surprised me how long it takes.

1
D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on December 31, 2012
at 07:06 PM

If you are doing serious cardio that would normally require someone to consume a small amount of carbs or protein after the workout then you are probably not helping your mass if you fast four 10 hours after that period.

I would recommend that depending on intensity you might want to incorporate BCAA's after the workout. Something like 10 grams an hour until you break your fast. Coffee and cream is not going to cut it if you're trying to preserve muscle into a fast AFTER a cardio session.

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on December 31, 2012
at 07:04 PM

Honestly, I think doing this (running several miles in the morning, not eating, lifting in the evening, and then only eating after that) will eventually burn you out. You will certainly waste muscle, unless you're eating HUGE amounts of protein OR huge amounts of starch (carbs are very protein sparing, actually), and your workouts will not be as intense (your motivation, strength, and stamina will all decline), thereby limiting your results.

When you have an intense workout and fast schedule, I think it's important to also eat from all the macronutrients, otherwise you'll be doing your body a huge disservice with the cortisol stress response. If you are keeping your workout schedule, I'd suggest eating a lighter lunch and then a reasonable dinner.

EDIT: I also workout 2x per day most days, and find I need 2 MEALS and a protein shake concoction to maintain weight.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on December 31, 2012
at 06:58 PM

I don't think its a great idea to go fasted post workout on a regular basis. Occasionally is fine.

How hard are you running? If you are going slow, say 10 min/mile or slower, then you are probably fine.

If you are going fast, you may want to drink a protein shake or eat a banana or something.

IF is not on/off switch. a small snack reduces the benefits, but does not eliminate it.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on December 31, 2012
at 11:30 PM

Speed is relative - 10 min/mile is quite high intensity for me...

0
138be7a21edcd70c350bdebfd05948db

on January 01, 2013
at 04:28 AM

Don't do it! I was stupid and did IF for 6-8 hours after running in the morning. I felt great until later in the day. After a few weeks I couldn't recover from running and my legs felt like lead. I repeated this routine until my body gave out. Don't try IFing more than a few hours and after running. It isn't worth it.

0
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on January 01, 2013
at 12:27 AM

I did all my running fasted - up to 13 miles on an empty stomach (and <25g of carb a day). If I eat anything post run, it didn't have any carbs in it. I have legs like tree trunks. Aint no muscle wastage here.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on January 01, 2013
at 01:39 AM

I agree. That would be pretty dumb.

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on January 01, 2013
at 01:26 AM

But the OP is talking about fasting for the rest of the day and then doing weight training and only then breaking the fast in the evening. From my personal experience, I think this would be too stressful, unless they have absolutely everything else dialed in and have close to zero stress from other sources. I think the OP would do better to have a meal around noon so that his/her eating window is not so compressed.

0
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on December 31, 2012
at 10:58 PM

You'll be fine long as your eating enough to hit your daily goals in your evening meals. I might add a couple of spoonfuls of coconut oil through your day to enhance your energy and focus at work.

Seriously, light cardio (I'm assuming light cardio to be < 75% of your max hr) in the morning is not going to evoke any sort of muscle wasting through the day. 2-3 miles a day is just fine. Long as you get your food sometime after your more intense evening session you will retain or gain (if you eat enough) lean mass.

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