1

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paleo brain vs enteric nervous system : one meal a day

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 07, 2012 at 3:06 PM

What is a proper time for one meal a day scheme? If paleo brain is not coupled to enteric nervous system(ENS) strongly, brain at night can rest and consolidate short term memory from hippocampus while ENS is kept busy directing digestion. What are scientific studies coupling between brain and enteric nervous system?

Two possible scenarios:

Scenario 1: night eating activates ENS and if there is strong coupling between brain and ENS, then 
 paleo brain cannot rest due to destructive interference.
Scenario 2: ENS and paleo brain are like multiprocessors, operating independantly.  Human body
 can function optimally from active paleo brain at day time and from active ENS in night time.
 due to low coupling between brain and ENS.

Questions: I would like to know scientific studies of connection between ENS and brain to optimize time of meals. Evolutionary conjecture is helpful but scientific understanding of neural connections directly would help to design meal time.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 29, 2012
at 01:19 AM

Incorrect. You can sleep on an empty stomach provided your parasympathetic system has been activated - such as post-orgasm.

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on June 16, 2012
at 10:06 PM

No need to be rude about it just because you're hiding behind the veil of anonymity. Please keep your dialogue respectful, as we're all here for the same basic purpose: to figure out how to optimize our health and broaden the N.

A6e2b231f69366ce825476c5a6dcfff6

(1967)

on March 07, 2012
at 11:23 PM

I think your over analyzing. Self experiment and see how you feel.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 07, 2012
at 04:05 PM

I believe you forgot scenarios 3-500 that have not yet been hypothesised . The best you can hope for is a logical debate based on "evolutionary conjecture" since this subject is far from complete understanding. Sounds like most bodily processes eh?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 07, 2012
at 04:04 PM

I believe you forgot scenarios 3-50 that have not yet been discovered. The best you can hope for is a logical debate based on "evolutionary conjecture" since this subject is far from complete understanding. Sounds like most bodily processes eh?

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6 Answers

best answer

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 29, 2012
at 01:08 AM

It would depend on the meal composition:

high protein > longer satiety period / lower serotonin release - better earlier part of day

high carb > lower satiety period / higher serotonin release - better closer to sleep

It would also depend on the background of activity and state of mind, i.e. sedentary vs active (low cortisol vs high cortisol)

Also bear in mind that there is an interface between food and the enteric nervous system - the type of gut bacterial network (enterotype) that also will influence how food is perceived.

0
7f8bc7ce5c34aae50408d31812c839b0

(2698)

on June 16, 2012
at 09:59 PM

Have no idea but I eat my one meal that has protein and carbs as dinner around 6pm. Any thing else I have during the day is fat only. Seems I have more stable energy throughout the day that way.

I sleep like a baby most nights.

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 08, 2012
at 02:40 AM

I can't cite research; this is strictly n=1.

I don't schedule my meal but I almost always eat between 2 and 4, with my meal taking at least an hour. I start with whole fruit, have a leafy salad and then the main course.

In the morning I'm not hungry but I enjoy sipping coffee with cream and honey .

Finishing my meal by 4 helps ensure my stomach is empty by bedtime and I sleep better that way.

0
Medium avatar

(2301)

on March 07, 2012
at 07:49 PM

If I think I read this correctly... I started sleeping biphasically when I stopped eating after 5/6 oclock. If that helps.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 07, 2012
at 07:47 PM

What is wrong with you?

-1
88bb9eb6f19e42cbccde8adf6debab75

on March 08, 2012
at 06:13 AM

This was a simple question, if you can't understand it something is wrong with you(to the other posters) to op: The brain is active during sleep and most people cannot infact sleep on an empty stomach. so I would go with that with a starting point.

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on June 16, 2012
at 10:06 PM

No need to be rude about it just because you're hiding behind the veil of anonymity. Please keep your dialogue respectful, as we're all here for the same basic purpose: to figure out how to optimize our health and broaden the N.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 29, 2012
at 01:19 AM

Incorrect. You can sleep on an empty stomach provided your parasympathetic system has been activated - such as post-orgasm.

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