5

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Fruit&Fructose - Extreme Appetite stimulant?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 12, 2010 at 5:40 PM

Several bloggers have writting about fructose and its effect on leptin possibly leading in great quantaties to leptin resistance. Logically people should reduce their intake of fructose to a minimum preferably to fruit with low sugar content like berries. I followed this approach but since Dr. Harris wrote that during weight loss it might be best to completly eliminate it I did so. I went over a month without any fruit and ate once a day until yesterday where I went for about 100-150g of berries with heavy cream during my meal. All month it was easy to control my hunger completly fasting if I wanted to or I would drink some coffee with cream but today after the berries I have a rageing hunger to the point that I drank about 200ml of cream which still didn't help. This is supposed to be a personal anecdote because I feel there is not enough focus on this to underline how some people may react to even small quantaties of fruit. I don't have this problem at all with vegetables like pickles or onions which I do eat daily. I am also sure that this can't be anything else since I prepare my meals for a couple of days in a row so the previous ones this week where identical to yesterdays.

Please share your expierences with fruit no matter if you expierenced something similar or not because it seems odd to me that such a small amount of fructose can result in such a dramatic effect. I can't imagine how I would feel after a spoon of HFCS right now... Obviously this effect seems to be exceptionally strong in my case but I would like to find out how others feel about it.

Florian

P.S.: I am from Germany so unfortunatly my english isn't perfect, please excuse any odd formulations or mistakes. I posted the same topic on PaNu but just to reach another audience I am also posting it here.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 18, 2010
at 02:20 AM

Florian, just try getting me to write back in German and see how bad it gets. ;-)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 10:48 PM

What do you mean by artificial quantaties? Drinking juice instead of eating fruit?

1fe018d8c39e60e1c93fda9883758d22

(195)

on March 12, 2010
at 09:40 PM

Yes I am familiar with Dr. Lustigs position but he does not oppose fruit consumption just the artifical quantaties introduced in today's society. Nevertheless I don't want to imply that everybody should stop consuming fruit just that people shouldn't assume that today frankenfruits are equal to other carbohydrates. The macronutrient carbohydrate is not a uniform group.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 09:32 PM

Here is the video link http://herculodge.typepad.com/herculodge/2010/02/the-truth-about-sugar-the-bitter-truth.html

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9 Answers

4
Be4b60059db3511771303de1613ecb67

(1137)

on March 12, 2010
at 07:56 PM

Eating more than 1/2 cup of berries at a time makes me crave more sugar/carbs, but not protein or fat. Fruit stalls my weight loss.

2
1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on August 19, 2010
at 06:05 AM

Ever since I was young, I've been a compulsive fruit eater. I used to think that I was somehow allergic to grapes, since I would always get a belly-ache - it wasn't until years later that I realised that scoffing an entire bag of grapes would give anyone a belly-ache! I could never stop at one handful.

Now, I seem to have an addiction-breaking point - if I haven't had much in the way of fruit & veg carbs, the slightest amount will set me off in a frenzy, but if I then have a lot of carbs, the cravings disappear. I guess it makes since in terms of biology - that the body wants its fill of sugar if it appears, but if the source is plentiful, the urgency is unnecessary... This obviously has little to do with the cravings that come from blood glucose fluctuations, though. I used to think that's all "mouth hunger" etc was about, but now I know my body and the science better, I see that it's not all so simple.

2
5cc9908801b79ff820bbc1eb7ac01b8f

on March 12, 2010
at 05:55 PM

If I have just fruit, I don't get the appetite stimulating effect. However, if I have concentrated fruit, as in fruit juice or sorbet or smoothie, even just a little, then I definitely feel voraciously hungry for carbs. Good question, Florian!

1
24868bf5aa2c49e269392765932d9dc4

(510)

on August 19, 2010
at 11:47 AM

When I was a child, I used to always have a sandwich and a piece of fruit for my lunch at school. I learned early on to eat the fruit FIRST, otherwise I would feel ravenous. I am now a 45-year-old adult who has struggled with eating disorders (anorexia and binge eating) since my teen years--and I am still trying to figure out how fruit fits in the mix! I think it increases my hunger dramatically--this probably sounds strange, but somehow, I can feel more satisfied with a smaller amount of something that is more intensely sweet than fruit than with a huge quantity of fruit. I don't know if that makes sense or not. I have recently tried adding some fruit back into my diet--but I don't think it is working for me. I didn't really miss it when I didn't have it (how can you really miss something that causes you problems?) but tried it because others urged me to do so--sometimes we know our bodies better than "others."

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 19, 2010
at 08:57 AM

that just seems natural: humans are genetically wired to consume large quantities of available carbs which will be swiftly converted to stored energy (=fat) which can be used lately; on the other hand, fruit want you to consume them in order to transfer their seeds to another location

0
8287c6ddae0d78eae0a09fdd5999617c

(2581)

on August 20, 2010
at 06:33 AM

I actually find fruit to be satiating.

On the other hand I find refined sugar products like candy, cookies and donuts, to be quite addictive. I think it might just be that we're conditioned to have attachments to that kind of junk food.

I am more likely to think that if the cause of the binge is physical, it's not what you're putting in that causing you to be voracious, but what you're NOT putting in. A lack of fiber or protein. A vitamin and mineral deficiency.

I don't think sugar is the reason behind binges, because people don't just binge on sugar. There are also high-fat foods that people binge on. Someone's problem food may be high in fat, or high in sugar.

I think it really is about eating whole foods instead of processed food most of the time. But just because they're whole foods doesn't mean you can't binge on them. There is still a need for self-control, diet doesn't automatically solve food addiction issues.

0
95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on August 19, 2010
at 08:39 PM

Certain carbs make me ravenous. Some fruit does this, some doesn't -- I mostly eat berries (I live near an organic berry farm, hard to resist this time of year), and they don't cause trouble. Starches are much worse, though -- something like white rice is brutal. One of my sons had an addiction to a particular brand of wheat crackers for awhile -- he could (and did) eat scary quantities in a sitting. I always understood it to be an insulin-related effect, but I may be misremembering Taubes.

0
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on March 12, 2010
at 11:25 PM

Fruit or fruit juice alone doesn't bother me, but if I cheat with any sugary gluten product (sucrose is 50% fructose), like cake or cookies, I'll have serious carb cravings for several hours. Everyone's metabolism is slightly different, and there are psychological overlays on your physiology.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 09:31 PM

I imagine you have either listened to or read work by Robert Lustig MD. There is a video available, but this written article explains his position on fructose. http://www.ucsf.edu/science-cafe/articles/obesity-and-metabolic-syndrome-driven-by-fructose-sugar-diet/

Possibly some people are more sensitive to fructose than others for some reason.

I myself can have a handful of fresh raspberries from our garden without becoming ravenous.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 09:32 PM

Here is the video link http://herculodge.typepad.com/herculodge/2010/02/the-truth-about-sugar-the-bitter-truth.html

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 12, 2010
at 10:48 PM

What do you mean by artificial quantaties? Drinking juice instead of eating fruit?

1fe018d8c39e60e1c93fda9883758d22

(195)

on March 12, 2010
at 09:40 PM

Yes I am familiar with Dr. Lustigs position but he does not oppose fruit consumption just the artifical quantaties introduced in today's society. Nevertheless I don't want to imply that everybody should stop consuming fruit just that people shouldn't assume that today frankenfruits are equal to other carbohydrates. The macronutrient carbohydrate is not a uniform group.

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