5

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Food before and after fasting?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 21, 2010 at 2:35 PM

I'm getting more into IF, and yesterday I went the longest ever (from ~9pm to 4pm the following day). I'd like to know specifically if there are any recommendations for food types (e.g protein, fat, veggies, etc.) to eat directly before and after a fast? Personally I am trying to lose weight. Thanks!

72a1e3ccf044c2fe1f994e10927e18a8

(183)

on July 30, 2010
at 05:09 AM

I agree, also your body will replenish the glycogen from protein sources... if you are eating low carb then your liver will do this faster and with more preference than a normal person. Also fructose has a lower GI so depends what fruits your eating....

6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on July 22, 2010
at 03:52 PM

What the study shows is that making your first post-workout meal a carb-heavy one is unnecessary for glycogen replenishment. You'll get there anyway in 24 hours. The liver is quite good at making glucose without any carb loading if you've been eating paleo for a while. Its just one of the reasons the first post-workout meal should be light on the carbs. It should also be light on the fat. Four hours after the post-workout meal? Eat whatever you want.

E91c7030cac0156b339c878afb5a9517

(225)

on July 22, 2010
at 03:23 PM

Cromulent, that's true but the rate of glycogen replenishment is irrelevant i think. We're not talking a whole lot of carbs, just within a SAD diet meal. a couple of fruits and yam is less than 90 g carb.

D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423

(821)

on July 22, 2010
at 02:07 PM

I agree, but since some people are ravenously hungry, you need to tell them to go easy.

6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on July 22, 2010
at 12:53 PM

See my edited comment. "It was concluded that, following glycogen depletion through intense intermittent exercise, complete recovery to preexercise values may be accomplished within 24 h; and that within this time period, the rate of resynthesis cannot be accelerated by a higher than normal carbohydrate intake."

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 22, 2010
at 04:36 AM

Just eat like you normally do, like the fast never happened, no more and no less.

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 22, 2010
at 04:34 AM

Or even necessary.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 22, 2010
at 03:01 AM

If you have significant glycogen to replenish, eating carbohydrates will certainly result in higher replenishment rates vs not.

6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on July 21, 2010
at 07:07 PM

Glycogen replenishment is not sped up in this fashion.

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7 Answers

best answer

1
E91c7030cac0156b339c878afb5a9517

(225)

on July 21, 2010
at 03:18 PM

Pre-fast i eat lots of protein with fibrous veggies with some fat. Post-fast i eat mixed meal with fruits. This is the time to eat fruits and more carby vegetables or tubers. All the carbs go to replenish your glycogen after the fast. I eat until i'm full and satisfied.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 22, 2010
at 03:01 AM

If you have significant glycogen to replenish, eating carbohydrates will certainly result in higher replenishment rates vs not.

6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on July 21, 2010
at 07:07 PM

Glycogen replenishment is not sped up in this fashion.

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 22, 2010
at 04:34 AM

Or even necessary.

E91c7030cac0156b339c878afb5a9517

(225)

on July 22, 2010
at 03:23 PM

Cromulent, that's true but the rate of glycogen replenishment is irrelevant i think. We're not talking a whole lot of carbs, just within a SAD diet meal. a couple of fruits and yam is less than 90 g carb.

6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on July 22, 2010
at 12:53 PM

See my edited comment. "It was concluded that, following glycogen depletion through intense intermittent exercise, complete recovery to preexercise values may be accomplished within 24 h; and that within this time period, the rate of resynthesis cannot be accelerated by a higher than normal carbohydrate intake."

72a1e3ccf044c2fe1f994e10927e18a8

(183)

on July 30, 2010
at 05:09 AM

I agree, also your body will replenish the glycogen from protein sources... if you are eating low carb then your liver will do this faster and with more preference than a normal person. Also fructose has a lower GI so depends what fruits your eating....

6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on July 22, 2010
at 03:52 PM

What the study shows is that making your first post-workout meal a carb-heavy one is unnecessary for glycogen replenishment. You'll get there anyway in 24 hours. The liver is quite good at making glucose without any carb loading if you've been eating paleo for a while. Its just one of the reasons the first post-workout meal should be light on the carbs. It should also be light on the fat. Four hours after the post-workout meal? Eat whatever you want.

best answer

2
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on July 22, 2010
at 04:21 AM

I found that for me works best protein with hearty addition of fat. For example my last time was a piece of cooked beef with 3 fried eggs (in beef fat). I finished with beef meatballs and again 3 fried eggs with coconut oil. I found that it makes my stomach ease nice and slowly into a fast, without any sudden hunger, and also ends with energy and building material without sudden load of carbs/sugar which would (I think) a shock to the system.

2
Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on July 21, 2010
at 04:40 PM

Eating a large meal of protein and fat, without much carbohydrate, will help to avoid hunger pangs during the fast, in my experience. The carbohydrate stimulates a larger insulin release than does the protein/fat, so it can result in lower blood sugar, stimulating hunger.

1
6f0efd477208f51d145bea6d7272256e

(627)

on July 21, 2010
at 07:06 PM

This experiment concludes that supplementing with additional carbohydrate does NOT increase glycogen resynthesis after high intensity, intermittent exercise. Within 24 hours all subjects restored their glycogen to its pre-exercise level. There was no difference between those consuming 2500 calories of carbohydrate in addition to the regular meals and those who ate normally.

SUTTON. Muscle glycogen repletion after high-intensity intermittent exercise. J. Appl. Physiol.: Respirat. Environ. Exercise Physiol. 42(2): 129-132, 1977.

Six normal subjects were studied after exhaustive, high-intensity intermittent exercise on a cycle ergometer. Subjects PC and CW (Table 1) were highly trained oarsmen, whereas the others, though active in daily training programs were not felt to reflect the same level of fitness. Work loads estimated for each subject approximately 140% of their maximal aerobic power. Subjects attempted to pedal for 1-min intervals with 3-min rest periods between, and continued until 30 s of exercise could no longer be maintained. Venous blood was sampled for lactate and glucose analysis. Muscle biopsies were extracted from the quadriceps before and immediately after exercise and at 2-, 5, 12-, and 24-h intervals thereafter for total glycogen analysis. Three subjects consumed a mixed controlled diet (approx. 3,100 kcal) during the 24 h after exercise, and three consumed the same diet plus an additional 2,50O/kcal carbohydrate. Following exercise, glycogen concentration had dropped to a mean value of approximately 28% of its preexercise value. After 2h, it had recovered to 39%, at 5h to 53%, at 12 h to 67%, and at 24 h to 102% of its pre-exercise value, with no difference in resynthesis rate between the two groups. It was concluded that, following glycogen depletion through intense intermittent exercise, complete recovery to preexercise values may be accomplished within 24 h; and that within this time period, the rate of resynthesis cannot be accelerated by a higher than normal carbohydrate intake.

0
Ac9425a387b78cb37a01972fe848bddb

(655)

on July 29, 2010
at 09:09 PM

So drinking a few glasses of wine after a 24 hour fast wouldn't be the smartest thing to do, I assume? =p

0
1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on July 21, 2010
at 03:39 PM

I've never worried about a particular choice of food before or after fasting, except perhaps including quite a bit of meat beforehand. I've never noticed a difference of any kind on varied post fast foods. The one exception to that is if I eat nuts on their own. My stomach is not happy if I eat more than a few nuts on their own post fast. I wouldn't worry too much, experiment a little and see how you feel.

0
D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423

(821)

on July 21, 2010
at 03:13 PM

I like to start with a small amount of light fruit, and then work my way up to heavier things.

I think it's good not to gorge before or after a fast, but to ease in and out.

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on July 22, 2010
at 04:36 AM

Just eat like you normally do, like the fast never happened, no more and no less.

D339c39d94d65460e28128174845f423

(821)

on July 22, 2010
at 02:07 PM

I agree, but since some people are ravenously hungry, you need to tell them to go easy.

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