4

votes

Worth dropping the assumption your steak and eggs are keeping insulin low?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 04, 2013 at 12:51 PM

An insulin index of foods: the insulin demand generated by 1000-kJ portions of common foods: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/66/5/1264.full.pdf

The results of this study confirm and also challenge some of our basic assumptions about the relation between food intake and insulinemia. Within each food group, there was a wide range of insulin responses, despite similarities in nutrient composition. The important Western staples, bread and potato, were among the most insulinogenic foods. Similarly, the highly refined bakery products and snack foods induced substantially more insulin secretion per kilojoule or per gram of food than did the other test foods. In contrast, pasta, oatmeal porridge, and All-Bran cereal produced relatively low insulin responses, despite their high carbohydrate contents. Carbohydrate was quantitatively the major macronutrient for most foods. Thus, it is not surprising that we observed a strong correlation between GSs and ISs (r = 0.70, P < 0.001). However, some protein and fat-rich foods (eggs, beef, fish, lentils, cheese, cake, and doughnuts) induced as much insulin secretion as did some carbohydrate-rich foods (eg, beef was equal to brown rice and fish was equal to grain bread).

Read: Glucagon, Dietary Protein, and Low-Carbohydrate Diets
Read: True or False? Adding Fat to A Carby Meal Lowers Insulin Response

Dd74e6399ae697d8603dc9aa74fbafae

(695)

on May 05, 2013
at 07:13 AM

I doubt that. With the release of insulin during protein consumption, your body releases glucagon as well to prevent your blood sugar from dropping. While sugary food must be consumed in large quantities and in short intervals to maintain a normal blood sugar, you could not possibly do the same with steaks. Also, your body is not as mechanical as we think, the insulin interactions that occur with the consumption of steak are different from that of sugar, as low-carb lead to a good kind of insulin resistance that is necessary when lacking carbs, but the muscle cells does not become resistant.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 04, 2013
at 05:42 PM

This leads to another crucial question: do the things that we (think we) know about evil, fattening, prematurely-aging, metabolic-syndrome-inducing insulin apply to insulin evoked by protein-rich food? Or is that response regulated differently? Will someone who consumes protein-rich, low-carb foods as continuously as SAD eaters consume high-GI carbohydrates be at the same risk of insulin resistance?

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on May 04, 2013
at 02:19 PM

Great thanks, trust Sisson to have a nice summary.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 04, 2013
at 02:17 PM

Yes, protein is very insulinogenic. It is also worth noting that adding pure starch to protein drinks LOWERS the insulin insulin response. It was a study done on whey/casein/egg/cod proteins and measured AUC of insulin responses. I posted it a while back I'll search again.Also, yeah adding fat to a meal will of course increase the insulin response, because it is drastically increasing the reward/palitability value (as well as calories) of the meal. I have been saying this stuff since day 1 and I'm happy people seem to be coming around to it :)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 04, 2013
at 02:14 PM

Yes, protein is very insulinogenic. It is also worth noting that adding pure starch to protein drinks LOWERS the insulin insulin response. It was a study done on whey/casein/egg/cod proteins and measured AUC of insulin responses. I posted it a while back I'll search again.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 04, 2013
at 01:14 PM

Nice find Speck

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1 Answers

6
Dd74e6399ae697d8603dc9aa74fbafae

(695)

on May 04, 2013
at 02:06 PM

Mark Sisson had an article about this last year: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/insulin-index/#axzz2SKf8MqnJ

This sums it up pretty well:

"The insulin helps drive amino acids into the muscle cells where they???re needed. At the heart of this process, one thing is for certain: the body knows what it???s doing.

But there???s another dimension to the protein-insulin issue. When we eat protein-rich food, another chemical is released by the body that actually has a contrary effect to insulin. Protein-rich foods also result in a release of glucagon. (Carb-rich food does not.) Glucagon raises blood sugar levels in part to allow for absorption of amino acids in the liver and their subsequent transformation there to glucose. In our evolution, we developed the capacity to make what we required out of what was available. If dinner was going to be part of a mammoth carcass, then the body could enjoy the protein it needed and use insulin response to store essential amino acids. Simultaneously, it had the glucagon to keep blood sugar stable in the absence of carb-based foods."

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on May 04, 2013
at 02:19 PM

Great thanks, trust Sisson to have a nice summary.

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