0

votes

Why is insulin the bad guy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 22, 2012 at 4:49 AM

Insulin is a vitally important hormone in your body. I know because as a type 1 diabetic, I frequently know what it's like to have too much or not enough. It is the hormone that pushes fuel into the cells and makes you grow. Do you consider insulin evil? Instead of talking about insulin spikes, should we be talking about glucose spikes?

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on October 09, 2012
at 05:01 AM

Interesting. Explain more, please.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 23, 2012
at 11:28 PM

Foreveryoung: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diabetes-and-alzheimers/AZ00050

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 22, 2012
at 10:25 PM

I read that tid bit in the PHD ....I'm gonna look up their source right now...in their book they state "Insulin resistance in the brain has negative effects. IN rats, high insulin diets reduce synaptic connections and impair learning. Insulin resistance in the prain promotes amyloid aggregation and Alzheimer's disease" They list these as citations: http://pmid.us/18651634 and http://pmid.us/19026743 , the latter being associated with the Alzheimer's claim.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 22, 2012
at 10:12 PM

I agree with JayJay. THe benefits of adding carbs into a post workout meal is most likely simply the increased glycogen storage and the protein-sparing (anti-catabolic) affect of carbs...not the insulin spike.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 22, 2012
at 10:11 PM

(I learned that this is a protective mechanism for when carbs/food was in shortage, so our brains could still get their needed energy (glucose and/or ketones) to operate and save our lives).

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 22, 2012
at 10:10 PM

Could you provide evidence that insulin resistance in the brain is associated with alzheimers? That strikes me as unlikely, since our brain cells are the only cells in our body that do not require insulin.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 22, 2012
at 06:17 PM

protein gives you plenty insulin to mobilize itself into your cells without any need for sugar.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 22, 2012
at 06:17 PM

silly though IMO....protein gives you plenty insulin mobilize itself into your cells without any need for sugar.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 22, 2012
at 07:44 AM

what jamie said, and I read that insulin primary function wasn't meant to regulate blood sugar it was meant to be used in times of famine or something like that. I still believe we don't need carbs. I just think since Leptin, the master hormone, of all other hormones and is a fat sensor, NOT a glucose sensor, plus Fat is also more satiating, and a more stable burning fuel.

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5 Answers

2
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 22, 2012
at 06:23 PM

Since its already been pointed out that insulin isn't "evil" since no endogenous hormone could be good or evil really, the point is excessive insulin is associated with aging, suppressing antimicrobial peptides, and hardening of the arteries, and insulin resistance in the brain is associated with alzheimers to name a few things.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 22, 2012
at 10:10 PM

Could you provide evidence that insulin resistance in the brain is associated with alzheimers? That strikes me as unlikely, since our brain cells are the only cells in our body that do not require insulin.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 22, 2012
at 10:25 PM

I read that tid bit in the PHD ....I'm gonna look up their source right now...in their book they state "Insulin resistance in the brain has negative effects. IN rats, high insulin diets reduce synaptic connections and impair learning. Insulin resistance in the prain promotes amyloid aggregation and Alzheimer's disease" They list these as citations: http://pmid.us/18651634 and http://pmid.us/19026743 , the latter being associated with the Alzheimer's claim.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 22, 2012
at 10:11 PM

(I learned that this is a protective mechanism for when carbs/food was in shortage, so our brains could still get their needed energy (glucose and/or ketones) to operate and save our lives).

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 23, 2012
at 11:28 PM

Foreveryoung: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diabetes-and-alzheimers/AZ00050

2
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on September 22, 2012
at 09:31 AM

It's seems a bit silly to personify any hormone as "good" or "evil" (although testosterone has made me do some pretty bad things over the years).

The problem is that your metabolism never evolved to deal with the kind of blood glucose spikes that a diet comprising of mainly neolithic refined carbohydrates promotes. Too much blood glucose leads to too much insulin, and too much energy being pushed into your cells, eventually causing insulin resistance and T2 diabetes in people like me. As you say, the problem is refined carbohydrates, not insulin.

For T1 guys like you, with a badly crocked pancreas, you'd be dead without injected insulin, so I can understand that your relationship with it is different than mine.

1
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 22, 2012
at 07:05 AM

Too much insulin, and you become insulin insensitive. Insulin also causes hunger. I agree, the effects of carbs themselves are also involved in harmful effects, like glycation, body fat and lipid alterations.

I dont think any natural body compound is evil. Or any macro/micro. Its just that your body has upper limits of tolerance.

0
C60cd8de76ce21b7d09c8e54586f41db

on October 08, 2012
at 05:03 PM

Insulin is more of an inhibitor than a storage hormone. During the 60s and 70s was the 'black age of endocrinology' where this idea that insulin is a fat storage hormone came about. Its wrong though. Diabetics don't need insulin to store glucose, they need insulin to prevent the liver from flooding their blood with glucose after they just eat a bunch of glucose.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on October 09, 2012
at 05:01 AM

Interesting. Explain more, please.

0
9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on September 22, 2012
at 08:59 AM

I purposefully eat sugars (usually in the form of honey) after lifting to spike insulin and promote growth. This is a big part of LeanGains and many other lifting-related diets.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 22, 2012
at 06:17 PM

protein gives you plenty insulin to mobilize itself into your cells without any need for sugar.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 22, 2012
at 10:12 PM

I agree with JayJay. THe benefits of adding carbs into a post workout meal is most likely simply the increased glycogen storage and the protein-sparing (anti-catabolic) affect of carbs...not the insulin spike.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 22, 2012
at 06:17 PM

silly though IMO....protein gives you plenty insulin mobilize itself into your cells without any need for sugar.

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