3

votes

What happens with the Insulin?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 29, 2011 at 4:04 PM

So I was reading up on an article about how low-gi foods can be misleading because of the insluin that STAYS elevated or traveling around the blood for hours on end doing damage after secretion. Then I wondered, why not tackle this Insulin problem by not just secreting a lot via blood sugar (hence don't eat stuff that releases insulin), but ALSO stop it to STAY in the blood like forever and a day. And that brings me to the question - Where exactly does Insulin go after it's done it's job and what makes it go there? Can't THAT process somehow be triggered earlier somehow so one can get rid of it earlier. Or is the article wrong by stating that Insulin sometimes stays in the blood for hours on end AFTER being secreted.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

This is true but leaves out the most important fact.....insulin in excess will kill you. And that is the point JC is asking about.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on June 13, 2011
at 01:19 PM

Westerners eat a high carb/High fat diet with the fat being PUFAs Indigenous people eat a High carb/relatively low fat low pufa diet.

F6ea948ab43dc51d72509c0989e670fe

(1639)

on June 13, 2011
at 06:57 AM

Well, the lack of emphasis of the U.S. diet on vegetable oil would be my only thought. That inflammation + high insulin levels from carbohydrates + sugar would be bad.

792634a784ec6a636c3137d0903e11b4

(1196)

on May 29, 2011
at 09:12 PM

I looked it up when I had the same question related to insulin produced when you fast and think about food (the Cephalic-Phase Insulin Response). The half life of insulin is really short - like 5 minutes. So the issue is about it being continually produced, rather than hanging around in the body. I think the article is wrong if it suggests that one surge of insulin is a problem.

Ea9559203fa70016dbf22f8be0eb151b

(65)

on May 29, 2011
at 05:05 PM

What is your opinion about this post claiming that elevated insulin may cause damage ? http://www.drjamescarlson.com/content.aspx?idx=53

Ea9559203fa70016dbf22f8be0eb151b

(65)

on May 29, 2011
at 05:04 PM

Sage it is not online sorry, it is published in a health section of an Afrikaans household magazine. They basically state that Low Gi foods might release sugar slowly into the blood, and that insulin might be secreted slowly, but that insulin sometimes stays elevated in blood for a very long time - and my question is about that long time that might be too long - If it's true of course :)

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on May 29, 2011
at 04:48 PM

hi JC, could you provide a link to the article in question?

9f933fedd259b97a5369c3ee5dae3151

(341)

on May 29, 2011
at 04:46 PM

I don't think this is true. Hormones are active compounds, and if they are in the blood longer than they are needed, they keep working anyway. The liver "deactivates" hormones, rendering them inert in the body and ready to be flushed out (we need sulphur to do this). *Making* the hormones is only part of the issue, the body has to clean them out, as well. And insulin levels correspond to other hormonal levels as well, like androgen, which can cause other problems.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on May 29, 2011
at 04:29 PM

Welcome JC.........I think this place will help you.

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2 Answers

1
3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

on June 13, 2011
at 05:59 AM

I can understand the merits of low-carb diets because they seem to reduce the need for insulin. I think low-carbing is essential if your metabolism is deranged or is in the process of becoming deranged. The latter describes most people in the U.S. who consume Neolithic agents such as gluten grains, plant oils, and granulated sugar/fructose.

However, here is the apparent paradox. Those indigenous culture and tribes who subsist on tubers have beautiful metabolism. I mean, their glucose tolerance is so much better than Westerners, who similarly eat a carb-heavy (albeit Neolithic) diet. I'm talking about (1) the highlanders of Papua New Guinea; (2) the Bantu of the Central African Republic; (3) Latin America's cassava-eating tribesmen; and (4) the Kitavans of Polynesia. Stephan Guyenet mentions these tribes in his blog:

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2010/11/glucose-tolerance-in-non-industrial.html

So here's the part that I don't understand, which I hope Dr. Quilt (or anyone who proposes eating 50g of carbs or less) can answer. How is it that a carb-heavy diet can promote such beautiful metabolism? Granted, these indigenous cultures are not eating Neolithic agents. However, if you eat tubers like yams, potatoes, and yuca, insulin will be deployed post-meal and WILL SPIKE to deal with skyrocketing BG, even in those who are healthy. How is it that these peoples can keep their FBG so low? Unlike post-prandial insulin spikes, the fasting blood sugar does indicate the health and state of your metabolism.

Wouldn't the serum insulin level in these people be higher than in the Inuits or San Bushmen (another traditional culture that ate low-carb)? I mean insulin will spike at least 3 times daily in these peoples, compared to slight insulin rises in the Inuits after protein consumption. Btw, Stephan believes that post-prandial insulin spikes do not contribute to obesity (I would go further and conclude that they do not harm metabolism nor contribute to the onset of chronic and degenerative diseases).

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2011/05/clarifications-about-carbohydrate-and.html

So I fully understand the merits of low-carbing. However, it seems that you can stay perfectly healthy by eating a carb-heavy diet, as long as you steer clear of gluten grains, sugar, and other Neolithic agents. There WILL be insulin spikes. But they don't seem to cause any harm as long as you avoid the aforementioned Neolithic items. So what am I missing?

F6ea948ab43dc51d72509c0989e670fe

(1639)

on June 13, 2011
at 06:57 AM

Well, the lack of emphasis of the U.S. diet on vegetable oil would be my only thought. That inflammation + high insulin levels from carbohydrates + sugar would be bad.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on June 13, 2011
at 01:19 PM

Westerners eat a high carb/High fat diet with the fat being PUFAs Indigenous people eat a High carb/relatively low fat low pufa diet.

0
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on May 29, 2011
at 04:39 PM

Insulin doesn't cause damage. Its a anabolic hormone necessary for bodily function. Lack of insulin is what causes problems.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

This is true but leaves out the most important fact.....insulin in excess will kill you. And that is the point JC is asking about.

Ea9559203fa70016dbf22f8be0eb151b

(65)

on May 29, 2011
at 05:05 PM

What is your opinion about this post claiming that elevated insulin may cause damage ? http://www.drjamescarlson.com/content.aspx?idx=53

9f933fedd259b97a5369c3ee5dae3151

(341)

on May 29, 2011
at 04:46 PM

I don't think this is true. Hormones are active compounds, and if they are in the blood longer than they are needed, they keep working anyway. The liver "deactivates" hormones, rendering them inert in the body and ready to be flushed out (we need sulphur to do this). *Making* the hormones is only part of the issue, the body has to clean them out, as well. And insulin levels correspond to other hormonal levels as well, like androgen, which can cause other problems.

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