3

votes

Is it high insulin or high blood glucose that is potentially damaging to the body?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 23, 2013 at 4:15 PM

I have been on strict paleo for a year now, and occasionally dip into keto. I purchased a blood-glucose monitor about two months ago and my glucose has consistently tests around 80-100 fasting and 100-105 after eating. I am a 24 year-old male with a family history of diabetes (type II) so these numbers are a bit scary for me. I had a blood test done and my C-peptide is 0.7ng/L (clinically low) and my Hemoglobin A1C is 4.8% (low end of normal, but normal). C-peptide is a marker of insulin levels. I believe these results suggest that I have low insulin levels but relatively high blood glucose levels.

Can anyone tlel me what this might mean for my body? What are the effects of low insulin with high blood glucose? Thanks!

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 24, 2013
at 02:46 AM

The question wasn't is insulin damaging, it was is Highinsulin damaging. Otherwise I agree with you mscott.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 23, 2013
at 11:22 PM

I don't believe that insulin is damaging. I think insulin does a *lot* of important things and you get problems when your cells don't respond to it very well. Type 1 diabetics can't make much insulin but still suffer the same increased health risks as the type 2 diabetics.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 23, 2013
at 07:38 PM

+1. of course BOTH are damaging. Make your muscle cells insulin sensitive so you can eat carbohydrates and not need a bunch of insulin to transport them.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 23, 2013
at 07:36 PM

+1. Of course BOTH are damaging. Make your muscle cells insulin sensitive so you can eat carbs require far less insulin to transport them.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 23, 2013
at 07:35 PM

Both .

3f5a1eb23846056fd854b56db8575d59

on April 23, 2013
at 06:44 PM

Well that's a relief that my numbers are normal, I saw low C-peptide and relatively high BG and got worried. I think I will follow your advice and use Akman's post-prandial tracking that he describes above. In addition, that topic you linked to is an excellent summary that explains exactly what I was wondering. Thank you very much!

3f5a1eb23846056fd854b56db8575d59

on April 23, 2013
at 06:37 PM

Wow, thank you VERY much for the advice. I am on keto right now but as soon as I get off, I will try this. You've made me feel much better! For some reason I was under the impression that 80-100 fasting was pre-diabetic.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

best answer

3
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on April 23, 2013
at 06:24 PM

1st, those are great numbers. 2nd, a lot of us here have noticed similar levels. Conventional wisdom says that 100 is pre-diabetic, but that applies to people on a standard American diet.

I have come to realize that our levels of blood sugar before and after meals is what SHOULD be normal, but we are measured against the population of people who are unhealthy. Your post-eating levels are what most people would love to have, and that's a better indicator of pre-diabetes. Your post-prandial (after eating) levels show how well you're handling the sugars in your diet, and a low level means that you're very good at cleaning up the toxic sugar levels in your blood. This is GOOD!

This has been raised here before, so here's another discussion that has some more technical info. http://paleohacks.com/questions/11888/lowcarb-diets-increase-decrease-insulin-resistance-which-one-is-it#axzz2RJOi0FUk

3f5a1eb23846056fd854b56db8575d59

on April 23, 2013
at 06:44 PM

Well that's a relief that my numbers are normal, I saw low C-peptide and relatively high BG and got worried. I think I will follow your advice and use Akman's post-prandial tracking that he describes above. In addition, that topic you linked to is an excellent summary that explains exactly what I was wondering. Thank you very much!

6
61a27a8b7ec2264b1821923b271eaf54

(3175)

on April 23, 2013
at 04:57 PM

80-100 fasting and 105 after eating is perfect! What are you thinking?

Want to do an even better test of your postprandials?

Assuming you can get up around 7am, take a blood glucose reading every 30 minutes until about 10am, then eat a great big baked potato or pile of mashed potatoes, at least 1/2 pounds worth, with no butter or fat or meat of any kind--just potato. Wait 15 minutes and take a glucose reading every 15 minutes for 4 hours.

Record every reading and plot them on a graph in Excel or some graph program. Keep this graph and test again in a few months or if your diet changes to compare as a baseline.

What you should see:

Fasting blood glucose between 80-120, then every half hour, it should go down a few points until you eat. After you eat it will spike a bit at 15 minutes to like 130, and by 60 minutes it will be 150-200. It should then drop every 15 minutes until you are in the 60's or low 70's at 2 hours and then rise to your pre-eating level at the 3 hour point.

This experiment will show you why an FBG at the doctors is kind of meaningless, it will also show you why random post-prandial readings are meaningless--it's the trend that counts.

Let us know what you find!

3f5a1eb23846056fd854b56db8575d59

on April 23, 2013
at 06:37 PM

Wow, thank you VERY much for the advice. I am on keto right now but as soon as I get off, I will try this. You've made me feel much better! For some reason I was under the impression that 80-100 fasting was pre-diabetic.

3
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 23, 2013
at 04:50 PM

Umm, both are damaging to the body... If you have high insulin and low glucose doesn't that like make you pass out/potentially die? Correct me If I'm wrong, I just remember that if you inject insulin you are supposed to do it with carbs so that your blood sugar doesn't drop way too low and you die. However on the other end of the spectrum high blood glucose has the potential to cause glycation damage, glycated proteins can very possibly lead to different degenerative diseases.

Work out and use up that muscle glycogen so your muscle cells demand more glucose so that hopefully you can get a lower blood glucose. I don't actually know what the normal reference range for blood glucose should be to tell you if you need to lower it, but when you exercise your cells produce glut4 and typically become more insulin sensitive, ultimately lowering blood glucose assuming you're consistent.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 23, 2013
at 07:36 PM

+1. Of course BOTH are damaging. Make your muscle cells insulin sensitive so you can eat carbs require far less insulin to transport them.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on April 23, 2013
at 07:38 PM

+1. of course BOTH are damaging. Make your muscle cells insulin sensitive so you can eat carbohydrates and not need a bunch of insulin to transport them.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on April 23, 2013
at 11:22 PM

I don't believe that insulin is damaging. I think insulin does a *lot* of important things and you get problems when your cells don't respond to it very well. Type 1 diabetics can't make much insulin but still suffer the same increased health risks as the type 2 diabetics.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 24, 2013
at 02:46 AM

The question wasn't is insulin damaging, it was is Highinsulin damaging. Otherwise I agree with you mscott.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!