5

votes

Is Alzheimer's disease really diabetes of the brain?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 11, 2011 at 8:06 PM

I am not generally a fan of Dr Oz. But my wife watches all the time and recorded a 12 min piece on Alzheimer's.

Dr Oz had a medical researcher from Rhode Island Hospital Dr. Suzanne de la Monte and current surgeon general of the US as guests.
Evidently Dr de la Monte works at both Brown Univ and Rhode Island Hospital. She has several NIH studies published. http://bms.brown.edu/gastroenterology/Faculty/delamonte.html

Dr Delamonte has found that chemical preservatives we eat get past the blood brain barrier and cause neurodegeneration. She says the worst chemical is nitrosomines that are ingested or are made in our bodies that have the ability to enter the brain to cause the degeneration.

She also says that the brain makes its own insulin and when the toxic chemicals enter the brain, it makes the brain become insulin resistant. Evidently the brain needs insulin to function and if it is not there the brain starts to atrophy allowing the amyloid plaque to form in the brain.

Foods that can cause this process to happen.

First: Smoked processed meats to include luncheon meats and bacon. We all know that conventionally cured bacon is done with sodium nitrites. Evidently those nitrites turn into the dreaded nitrosomines she talks about.

Second: Processed cheeses. I presume cheeses like american cheese and cheez whiz and the like.

Third: Beer seems to have these chemical preservatives but it is not listed on the label.

Fourth: All the white products to include sugar and flour.

Also stated, obesity leads to diabetes in the body which leads to alzheimer's since there is more alzheimer's in diabetics.

Here is the link to the first of three segments with the other links to second and third segments on the same page. http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/alzheimers-breakthrough-pt-1

The one offending food that I consume is the ordinary supermarket bacon. I guess no more until I can find some uncured pork belly.

One question I have is: How does the brain make it's own insulin? It would seem that we have insulin in our blood from our pancreas that perhaps a small portion makes it past the blood brain barrier to enter the brain...enough that is needed. Perhaps the nitrosomines are able to attack the blood brain barrier little by little to get into the brain and destroy the insulin that is already there.

Dr. K Can you give any insite into this?

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on July 11, 2011
at 06:54 PM

To answer the posts question. YES.

427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 12, 2011
at 03:10 PM

My mum also has LBD. Two things that significantly increase her Mini Mental State Exam score are 1) A Ketogenic Diet and 2) 5,000iu/day of Vitamin D3. See http://nigeepoo.blogspot.com/2009/03/look-after-your-brain.html

427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 12, 2011
at 03:09 PM

My mum also has LBD. Two things that significantly increase her Mini Mental State Exam score are 1) A Ketogenic Diet and 2) 5,000iu/day of Vitamin D3. See [Look after your brain][1] [1]: http://nigeepoo.blogspot.com/2009/03/look-after-your-brain.html

427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 12, 2011
at 03:07 PM

My mum also has LBD. Two things that significantly increase her Mini Mental State Exam score are 1) A Ketogenic Diet and 2) 5,000iu/day of Vitamin D3. See http://nigeepoo.blogspot.com/2009/03/look-after-your-brain.html "Look after your brain"

427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 12, 2011
at 03:05 PM

My mum also has LBD. Two things that significantly increase her Mini Mental State Exam score are 1) A Ketogenic Diet and 2) 5,000iu/day of Vitamin D3. See Look after your brain.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on April 12, 2011
at 01:09 AM

If Dr de la Monte only has only part of the story, can you enlighten us on the rest of the story?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on April 12, 2011
at 12:48 AM

They only have part of the story.....don't believe a heart surgeon or general surgeon know a lot about a brain disease. Leave that to the real experts

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 12, 2011
at 12:24 AM

Ha ha - I feel your pain. As someone who has eaten bacon for breakfast for the past several years, my reaction was 'oh, fuuuuh-uh fat free granola!'.

0c0c5c65612425e497b7231c21516943

(1354)

on April 11, 2011
at 09:53 PM

I just googled alzheimer's and type 3 diabetes. It was in articles as early as 2005. I am sure that metabolic syndrome plays a big role in it.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on April 11, 2011
at 08:46 PM

ive heard of Alzheimer disease referred to as "Type III Diabetes". very interesting...

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7 Answers

3
427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 13, 2011
at 08:01 AM

The brain has Glu-T1 glucose transporters which work independently of insulin. If these begin to fail for whatever reason, the brain becomes starved of glucose. In 2006, I had an insulin stress test (to test my pituitary gland). During the test, my serum glucose fell to 1.5mmol/L (27mg/dL). I was told after the test had finished that I became confused, although I was unaware of this. My pituitary gland failed the test, by the way.

A ketogenic diet provides the brain with a second fuel option, D-3-Hydroxybutyrate. D-3-Hydroxybutyrate provides 5kcals/g, so it's a "higher-octane" fuel than glucose. Not all brain cells can run on it, though. Dendritic brain cells are too narrow to accomodate mitochondria, so they have to use glycolytic processes to generate ATP. See http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogspot.com/2011/01/alzheimers-mild-cognitive-impairment.html

3
9f304139f11b229ee56cf3d92b8c6c80

on April 11, 2011
at 10:43 PM

Nutrition and Alzheimer's Disease: The detrimental role of a high carbohydrate diet.

This is a recent paper that will shed some light on the role of insulin and the brain. My mother has Lewy Body Disease , which is the granddaddy when it comes to dementia. Since her diagnosis I have done my fair share of research, mostly Alzheimer's, as that is where most of the research dollars and time is spent.

427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 12, 2011
at 03:05 PM

My mum also has LBD. Two things that significantly increase her Mini Mental State Exam score are 1) A Ketogenic Diet and 2) 5,000iu/day of Vitamin D3. See Look after your brain.

427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 12, 2011
at 03:09 PM

My mum also has LBD. Two things that significantly increase her Mini Mental State Exam score are 1) A Ketogenic Diet and 2) 5,000iu/day of Vitamin D3. See [Look after your brain][1] [1]: http://nigeepoo.blogspot.com/2009/03/look-after-your-brain.html

427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 12, 2011
at 03:07 PM

My mum also has LBD. Two things that significantly increase her Mini Mental State Exam score are 1) A Ketogenic Diet and 2) 5,000iu/day of Vitamin D3. See http://nigeepoo.blogspot.com/2009/03/look-after-your-brain.html "Look after your brain"

427016b70156ae53719ccaec6d68aec0

on April 12, 2011
at 03:10 PM

My mum also has LBD. Two things that significantly increase her Mini Mental State Exam score are 1) A Ketogenic Diet and 2) 5,000iu/day of Vitamin D3. See http://nigeepoo.blogspot.com/2009/03/look-after-your-brain.html

1
Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 11, 2011
at 10:41 PM

I won't give up cured and smoked meats and you can't make me! :::thrashing about:::

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on April 12, 2011
at 12:24 AM

Ha ha - I feel your pain. As someone who has eaten bacon for breakfast for the past several years, my reaction was 'oh, fuuuuh-uh fat free granola!'.

0
Bedfe63df97356ee7a3ed61b58f8a218

on April 19, 2011
at 11:27 PM

The 2005 article is reporting on Suzanne M. de la Monte's findings way back then. See a sample below. So, they are just now reporting something on the Dr. Oz show that did come out 6 years ago.

30 November, 2005 18:42 GMT

Could Alzheimer's be a form of diabetes? That's the tantalizing suggestion from a new study that finds insulin production in the brain declines as Alzheimer's disease advances. "Insulin disappears early and dramatically in Alzheimer's disease," senior researcher Suzanne M. de la Monte, a neuropathologist at Rhode Island Hospital and a professor of pathology at Brown University Medical School, said in a prepared statement.

"And many of the unexplained features of Alzheimer's, such as cell death and tangles in the brain, appear to be linked to abnormalities in insulin signaling. This demonstrates that the disease is most likely a neuroendocrine disorder, or another type of diabetes," she added.

The discovery that the brain produces insulin at all is a recent one, and de la Monte's group also found that brain insulin produced by patients with Alzheimer's disease tends to fall below normal levels.

Now her group has discovered that brain levels of insulin and its related cellular receptors fall precipitously during the early stages of Alzheimer's. Insulin levels continue to drop progressively as the disease becomes more severe -- adding to evidence that Alzheimer's might be a new form of diabetes, she said.

In addition, the Brown University team found that low levels of acetylcholine -- a hallmark of Alzheimer's -- are directly linked to this loss of insulin and insulin-like growth factor function in the brain.

The report appears in the November issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

0
0c0c5c65612425e497b7231c21516943

(1354)

on April 11, 2011
at 09:46 PM

I have heard Robb Wolf talk about it as a glucose problem. I know that Jimmy Moore had a guest on one time and they called it type 3 Diabetes. The brain is made up of fat and if people aren't eating fat but are eating high carbs. I believe it!

0c0c5c65612425e497b7231c21516943

(1354)

on April 11, 2011
at 09:53 PM

I just googled alzheimer's and type 3 diabetes. It was in articles as early as 2005. I am sure that metabolic syndrome plays a big role in it.

0
9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

on April 11, 2011
at 09:19 PM

My grandfather died from Alzheimer's complications and he was thin as a rail. Raised on meat and potatoes, but in the end I guess they were using margarine a lot. My grandmother would bake all sorts of amazing confections, but couldn't eat any because she was diabetic.

I wouldn't take it as truth just because it was on Oprah. Actually especially not if it was on Oprah.

0
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 11, 2011
at 08:56 PM

Oz of course was not the first person to say this. He couldn't think his way thru data if his life depended on it. I first read about it from Jenny at diabetesupdate 101 who reports of new research about diabetes. She really knows her way around a report and does a great job as she doesn't just repeat the standard line. A low carb but not a fan of many things like Paleo, I still respect her knowleadge. Calling alzheimer's type III or diabetes of the Brain is still an early call but the evidence is clerar that something is going on. What you call it is still up in the air. Personally I don't see type I and type II as the same disease.

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