1

votes

Insulin spike or not?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 20, 2011 at 7:13 PM

Someone over at jackkruse.com asked what constitutes an insulin spike, which I would also like to know. How many points deviation means you have gone passed normal to abnormal. If your fasting bg is 88, you drink a whey protein and it goes up to 105 then declines, that seems normal to me; so what would the numbers look like in a spike that would be of concern?

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on November 02, 2011
at 01:23 AM

I'm not sure how they defined these individuals as "normoglycemic." If their BG levels stay high two or more hours after a meal, doesn't that indicate they *are not* normal? It seems like redefining the question away to me.

69a2a5deb24d5b8d3aae3d9652fac564

(1020)

on November 01, 2011
at 09:48 PM

But the OP is not asking about fasting BG, as he gave the example of drinking a whey protein shake...

Bf76cedd52060b1777ea7a8076e50866

(691)

on November 01, 2011
at 08:29 PM

Here is some of the research on BCAAs and insulin spikes. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21512300

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 01, 2011
at 07:34 PM

I wish whoever gave you -1 had explained it!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 01, 2011
at 07:32 PM

Thanks, Dr., you answered a question of mine.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 01, 2011
at 07:31 PM

Except . . . what do you think about this? [Health Correlator](http://healthcorrelator.blogspot.com/2010/05/blood-glucose-variations-in-normal.html) has an interesting article about this.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 01, 2011
at 06:50 PM

have you tried just eating whole fruits? maybe in combination with pro and fat?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 21, 2011
at 01:07 PM

nice one, Japsican. There is widespread misunderstanding of the difference between acute responses and chronic responses with regards to many of our bodies' hormonal actions. The ongoing discussions involved cortisol release is another example.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 21, 2011
at 12:09 PM

But the spike is prognostic. If your fasting BG is over 89 no matter what you have a metabolic issue with insulin

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 21, 2011
at 12:08 PM

This is spot on advice

20c518f9d33b0d04c7a19b8bb7487695

(195)

on July 20, 2011
at 10:01 PM

Thanks to one and all. I had begun measuring my bg a year ago in order to make sure I don't get T2D. I like doing periodic checking of various foods to see if they are giving me an unusual reaction, but I was not clear about what made for "spike."

B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6

(566)

on July 20, 2011
at 08:17 PM

One measures blood glucose with a meter like One Touch. I bought mine and the local drug store for about $20. (Note, test strips, etc are more expensive, but amazon.com has them fairly cheap). Personally, i think it is worth it to see how one is responding to food and how much improvement (or lack thereof) is occurring.

0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on July 20, 2011
at 07:55 PM

Good question -- and I'd add, at the risk of sounding dumb -- how do folks go about measuring this themselves, and is it something worth doing?

  • 20c518f9d33b0d04c7a19b8bb7487695

    asked by

    (195)
  • Views
    5K
  • Last Activity
    1404D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

6
03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on July 20, 2011
at 07:52 PM

"Insulin spike" is a bit of a misnomer, since it's really your blood sugar that's spiking, because you aren't producing enough insulin to keep up (or are resistant to its effects). Anyway, my understanding is that a healthy, insulin-sensitive person's blood sugar will never go over 120, even after a high-carb binge, and will be back in the normal (70-100) range within two hours. If yours goes over 120, or is still over 100 more than two hours after a meal, there's probably something you could address there.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 21, 2011
at 12:08 PM

This is spot on advice

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on November 02, 2011
at 01:23 AM

I'm not sure how they defined these individuals as "normoglycemic." If their BG levels stay high two or more hours after a meal, doesn't that indicate they *are not* normal? It seems like redefining the question away to me.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 01, 2011
at 07:31 PM

Except . . . what do you think about this? [Health Correlator](http://healthcorrelator.blogspot.com/2010/05/blood-glucose-variations-in-normal.html) has an interesting article about this.

5
69a2a5deb24d5b8d3aae3d9652fac564

(1020)

on July 20, 2011
at 08:33 PM

To add to Aaron's comment about how it's blood sugar that's actually being monitored:

I'd like to add that "Acute insulin spikes" are normal and necessary. In response to sensory stimuli (ie seeing food or smelling food), you secrete insulin to prepare the body for caloric intake.

In response to rising glucose levels (either by carb intake or protein intake thru gluconeogenesis) in the bloodstream, chemoreceptors signal the betacells in the pancreas to secrete insulin.

So, the spike itself is not abnormal, although prolonged and extreme spikes as a result of insulin resistance is indeed abnormal. Your blood sugar doesn't necessarily measure this. It's conceivable that one could have some insulin resistance, take in some glucose, and still have normal blood sugar levels, but only because they body is compensating for the resistance, and doing so by over-secreting and bathing receptor sites with excess insulin.

To test for levels and resistance, you'd want to do draw for insulin levels, c-peptide, insulin tolerance test (ITT), and glucose tolerance test (GTT).

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 21, 2011
at 01:07 PM

nice one, Japsican. There is widespread misunderstanding of the difference between acute responses and chronic responses with regards to many of our bodies' hormonal actions. The ongoing discussions involved cortisol release is another example.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 21, 2011
at 12:09 PM

But the spike is prognostic. If your fasting BG is over 89 no matter what you have a metabolic issue with insulin

69a2a5deb24d5b8d3aae3d9652fac564

(1020)

on November 01, 2011
at 09:48 PM

But the OP is not asking about fasting BG, as he gave the example of drinking a whey protein shake...

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 01, 2011
at 07:32 PM

Thanks, Dr., you answered a question of mine.

2
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on July 20, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Here is a link that explains things in detail: http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/16422495.php

I am a T2 diabetic and anything that spikes me to 120+ and then does not return to my normal level within an hour is a concern, but eating the way I do I do not get spikes anymore and my BG is well within normal ranges.

20c518f9d33b0d04c7a19b8bb7487695

(195)

on July 20, 2011
at 10:01 PM

Thanks to one and all. I had begun measuring my bg a year ago in order to make sure I don't get T2D. I like doing periodic checking of various foods to see if they are giving me an unusual reaction, but I was not clear about what made for "spike."

1
Ba27b59aa877fad44ddc4c50c9ed905a

on July 21, 2011
at 05:30 AM

I'm insulin resistant. A glass of fruit juice sends my glucose levels into a dive...once below 30, which luckily happened in a hospital while getting the hypoglycemia test. My pancreas just doesn't get the ???hey, that's enough insulin??? signal. Fructose is by far the worst trigger. Dextrose (glucose) doesn't seem to affect me nearly as bad.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 01, 2011
at 06:50 PM

have you tried just eating whole fruits? maybe in combination with pro and fat?

0
Bf76cedd52060b1777ea7a8076e50866

on November 01, 2011
at 06:35 PM

Insulin spikes are needed for the finalization of of your body to produce IGF-1 after a growth hormone spike. Insulin spikes are very anabolic, but the timing of them are critical for protein synthesis and the anabolic process. After a workout is the prime window to have an insulin spike and you don't need fructose or dextrose to accomplish it. Taking Branch Chain Amino Acids will cause an insulin spike just by themselves. Protein with BCAAs and some low GI carbs taken after a workout will maximize the insulin spike to produce IGF-1 and deliver amino acids into the muscle.

Bf76cedd52060b1777ea7a8076e50866

(691)

on November 01, 2011
at 08:29 PM

Here is some of the research on BCAAs and insulin spikes. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21512300

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 01, 2011
at 07:34 PM

I wish whoever gave you -1 had explained it!

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!