4

votes

Insulin Index Vs. Glycemic Index

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 05, 2011 at 1:59 AM

Are either useful? Which is more useful?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 05, 2011
at 12:17 PM

Maj, you need to visit Idaho to see industrialized potatoes.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 05, 2011
at 09:57 AM

Travis, what makes you think that rice is better then potato. If nothing else, potato is not industrialized in any way.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:35 AM

Ambi: Yeah, I never see anyone in the paleosphere talk about the insulin:glucagon ratio. It's all important. Eric: Well, appetite generally takes care of it for you. When I eat a big steak, I don't get hungry for 7-8 hours. I don't need to wait that long to not interfere with digestion, but why am I eating before I get hungry anyway? For starch, I get hungry way sooner, but digestion is far more simple. I consider the somewhat common fear of combining fat with starch to be misguided. That fat is being largely shuttled to adipocytes either way.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 05, 2011
at 04:53 AM

Travis... Great insight. How long do you need to wait between eating the diffrent macros? Is it 30 minutes or is it lunch -vs- dinner?

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on October 05, 2011
at 03:27 AM

Excellent points. Just looking at the insulin effect without the glucagon is misleading.

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3 Answers

4
Medium avatar

on October 05, 2011
at 02:39 AM

I think the insulinogenic nature of protein is largely irrelevant since glucagon is released at the same time. As such, lipid oxidation is pretty much unaffected by protein ingestion. If you take a walk fasted or with a steak in your stomach, the amount of fat mobilized and oxidized is probably 95% comparable.

I think the glycemic index actually is relevant because glycogenesis is a fairly slow process, so you'd probably want blood glucose to be elevated as little as possible during glycogen formation. As such, it may in some cases be better to, for example, eat rice instead of white potato, or at least eat fat with the starch. Protein reduces glycemic index, but eating it with starch may then interfere with the digestion of the protein.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on October 05, 2011
at 05:35 AM

Ambi: Yeah, I never see anyone in the paleosphere talk about the insulin:glucagon ratio. It's all important. Eric: Well, appetite generally takes care of it for you. When I eat a big steak, I don't get hungry for 7-8 hours. I don't need to wait that long to not interfere with digestion, but why am I eating before I get hungry anyway? For starch, I get hungry way sooner, but digestion is far more simple. I consider the somewhat common fear of combining fat with starch to be misguided. That fat is being largely shuttled to adipocytes either way.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on October 05, 2011
at 03:27 AM

Excellent points. Just looking at the insulin effect without the glucagon is misleading.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on October 05, 2011
at 04:53 AM

Travis... Great insight. How long do you need to wait between eating the diffrent macros? Is it 30 minutes or is it lunch -vs- dinner?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 05, 2011
at 09:57 AM

Travis, what makes you think that rice is better then potato. If nothing else, potato is not industrialized in any way.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 05, 2011
at 12:17 PM

Maj, you need to visit Idaho to see industrialized potatoes.

3
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on October 05, 2011
at 09:24 AM

I think both are useful to diabetics for glycemic control. If you're asking about for weight control or health in general? Well ... almost all things that decline with age relate to insulin resistance which results in the elevated insulin levels. But it's insulin signaling that's the key. Whatever promotes insulin sensitivity in one's diet is what's important, not whether a food uses more insulin or is absorbed more or less rapidly.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 05, 2011
at 12:12 PM

When I was Type 2, I used glycemic index to select low blood glucose response foods. GI followed the results I got with my blood glucose meter, and the number of foods which the University of Sydney has cataloged is huge. I haven't worked with insulin index but understand that it is correlated with GI (see http://www.ajcn.org/content/66/5/1264.short) . I have read that the two can differ - for instance unsweetened yogurt has low GI, but still provokes an insulinimic response more like milk.

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